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Ly^' 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY, 



GC 

3 1833 01856 2592 977.2 

IN2YE, 
1922 






t 



YEAR BOOK 



State of Indiana 



FOR THE YEAR 

1922 



Compiled and Published under the Direction of 

WARREN T. McCRAY 

Governor 

by 

THE LEGISLATIVE REFERENCE BUREAU 

CHARLES'KETTLEBOROUGH. Director 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

YVM. B BIJRFORD, CONTRACTOR FOR STATE PRINTING AND BINDING 

1928 



INTRODUCTION 




The Indiana Year Book was provided for and established by an act 
approved February 24, 1917, and is compiled, published and distributed 
under the direction of the Governor by the Legislative Reference Bureau. 
The Year Book is designed to present in a concise and compact form the 
essential parts of the annual official reports of all of the state offices, 
boards, commissions, departments, bureaus and institutions, except the 
educational, benevolent and correctional institutions, whose official reports 
are issued separately, together with selected information, data and statis- 
tics concerning the State of Indiana, its people, resources, government, 
crops and economic and social conditions. Aside from the institutional 
reports and special departmental bulletins of a technical or scientific 
character, no official reports or statistical or other state manuals except 
those herein contained are published. The first volume of the Year Book 
was issued in 1918; the present volume, which is the sixth of the series, 
covers the fiscal year ending September 30, 1922. Each office, board, com- 
mission, bureau or department maintained wholly or partly by state 
funds is required to submit a report to the Governor not later than De- 
cember 1st, setting forth the duties, functions, personnel, expenditures, 
income and the character and extent of the achievements and activities 
of the department during the fiscal year last preceding. These reports 
are then edited and standardized for publication by the Legislative Refer- 
ence Bureau. As the Year Book is designed as a manual of the state 
government, it is hoped that copies may be made available to public offi- 
cials, newspapers, libraries, schools, colleges and citizens of the state gen- 
erally. As 10,000 copies of the 1922 Year Book have been issued, per- 
sons who are interested may obtain copies free of charge by applying in 
person or by mail to the Legislative Reference Bureau, Room 335, State 
House, Indianapolis. 

WARREN T. McCRAY, 
Governor of the State of Indiana. 



in 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/yearbookofstateo00indi_1 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Introduction iii 

Secretary of State 3 

Certificate of Title Department 5 

Securities Commission 10 

Primary Election Returns 11 

Abstract of Vote 49 

Auditor of State 103 

Treasurer of State. 137 

State Board of Accounts , 146 

Board of Certified Accountants 151 

Industrial Board 153 

Compensation Department 154 

Factory and Building Inspection 158 

Boiler Department 159 

Department of Mines and Mining 160 

Department of Women and Children 187 

Free Employment Service ^ 214 

Department of Banking 220 

Building and Loan Department 233 

Loan and Credit Department 252 

State Board of Health 257 

Laboratory of Hygiene 262 

Department of Weights and Measures 283 

Water and Sewage Department 289 

Department of Oil Inspection 301 

Division of Infant and Child Hygiene ; 303 

Division of Public Health Nursing 332 

Tuberculosis Division 348 

Division of Venereal Diseases 356 

Housing Division * 359 

Vital Statistics 364 

State Fire Marshal 401 

Public Library Commission 415 

State Library 466 

Indiana Law Library 474 

Indiana Historical Commission 476 

Department of Conservation 483 

Division of Geology 490 

Division of Entomology 508 

Division* of Forestry 522 

Division of Lands and Waters 532 

Division of Fish and Game 540 

Division of Engineering 579 

v 



Page 

Public Service Commission 601 

Board of Medical Registration and Examination 682 

Board of Examination and Registration of Nurses 690 

Board of Dental Examiners , 707 

Board of Pharmacy 709 

Board of Registration and Examination in Optometry 712 

Board of Embalmers 713 

Board of Registration for Engineers and Land Surveyors 715 

Board of Agriculture 720 

Corn Growers' Association 728 

Co-operative Crop Reporting Service 733 

Live Stock Sanitary Board 781 

Clerk of Supreme and Appellate Courts 787 

Superintendent of Public Buildings and Property 788 

State Probation Officer 789 

Board of Pardons 794 

Adjutant General 796 

Board of Public Printing 824 

Board of Election Commissioners 827 

Indiana University 828 

Purdue University 837 

Indiana State Normal School 851 

Department of Public Instruction. . .• 862 

Division of Teacher Training 864 

Division of Licensing Teachers 871 

Division of Elementary and High School Inspection 877 

Division of Vocational Education 886 

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation 902 

Division of School Attendance 904 

State Teachers' Retirement Fund 940 

State Highway Commission 944 

Division of Audit 947 

Division of Construction 961 

Testing Department 995 

Division of Maintenance 1008 

Division of Equipment 1024 

Board of State Charities 1031 

State Institutions 1043 

Attorney-General 1060 

Department of Insurance 1067 

Board of Tax Commissioners 1076 

Inheritance Tax Department 1173 

State Officers, Beards and Commissions 1180 

Congressional Delegation 1194 

County Officers 1194 

Mortgages 1210 

Deeds 1216 

Administration of Justice 1219 

Marriage and Divorce 1222 



ANNUAL REPORTS 

OF 

State Officers, Departments, 

Bureaus, Boards and 

Commissions 

FOR THE 

Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 1922 



REPORT OF SECRETARY OF STATE 



OFFICERS AND ASSISTANTS 

ED JACKSON, Secretary of State. 

P. H. WOLFARD, Deputy Secretary of State. 

FRANK DENIUS, Assistant Deputy Secretary of State. 

ELIZABETH D. MASON, Stenographer. 

FLOSSIE COLLINS LAFKIN, Cashier. 

Under the provisions of the Constitution of 1851, a Secretary of 
State is elected by the voters of the state for a term of two years. The 
term of office of the present incumbent expires on November 27, 1924. 

The duties enjoined upon the Secretary of State by the Constitu- 
tion and statutes includes the publication and sale of the Acts of the 
General Assembly; the filing and recording of all certificates and docu- 
ments relating to private corporations; the issuing of commissions to 
elective and appointive officers ; issuing licenses to operate private de- 
tective agencies and licensing of tankage plants. 

Added to the foregoing duties are the licensing of motor vehicles 
and registration of titles to same and also the licensing of the sale of 
stocks and securities. Owing, to the numerous duties imposed upon the 
Secretary of State, his office has become one of the largest administra- 
tive departments of the state government. 

The receipts in fees from the corporation department for the year 
ending September 30, 1922, are as follows: 

Domestic Corporation Fees $193,721 00 

Foreign Corporation Fees 68,826 46 

Miscellaneous Certificates 166 50 

Notary Public Commissions 5,360 00 

Official Commissions 107 60 

Warrants on Requisitions . 267 00 

Trade Marks , 221 00 

Fertilizer Licenses 78 00 

Certified Copies ' 1,871 00 

Annual Reports, Domestic 4,215 00 

Annual Reports, Foreign 842 00 

Sale of Court Reports 5,026 50 

Sale of Acts of Legislature : 105 75 

Miscellaneous Fees 1,349 61 



Total Fees Collected $282,157 82 

The following table represents the appropriations made by the legis- 
lature for the expenses of the office, exclusive of the securities and motor 
vehicle departments, for the last fiscal year, and the amounts expended 
from said appropriations: 

(3) 



4 Year Book 

Appropriation 

Salary Secretary of State $6,500 00 

Salary Deputy Secretary of State 3,000 00 

Salary Assistant Deputy 2,000 00 

Salary Stenographer 1,200 00 

Salary Cashier 1,500 00 

Office Expenses 750 00 

Distribution Public Documents 250 00 

Distribution Court Reports 250 00 

Special Recording 600 00 

Totals $16,050 00 



Expense 


Balance 


$6,500 00 




3,000 00 




2,000 00 




1,200 00 




1,500 00 




633 30 


$116 70 


250 00 




200 00 


50 00 


350 00 


250 00 


$15,633 30 


$416 70 



AUTOMOBILE DEPARTMENT 

ROAD FUND 

H. D. McCLELLAND, Manager. 

FRANK A. RICHARDS, Assistant Manager. 

JOHN W. PARRETT, Auditor. 

R. R. SINGLETON, Chief Clerk. 

INEZ FLECK, Cashier. 

IVA LEONARD, Assistant Cashier. 

ROSA O'NEAL, Mail Cashier. 

LUELLA GRAHAM, Branch Cashier. 

MILDRED HOOKER, Branch Cashier. 

M. W. PERSHING, Clerk. 

WILLIAM PEIRCE, Clerk. 

A. E. HAWKINS, Shipping Clerk. 

CLYDE L. HURST, Delivery Clerk. 

RAY H. THOMPSON, Delivery Clerk. 

JOSEPH BROYLES, Clerk. 

ANNA WEAVER, File Clerk. 

MARY L. LESLEY, Trouble Clerk. 

NORMA JOLLIFFE, Stenographer. 

NONA T. PARRETT, Notary Public. 

MARY NEWELL, Clerk. 

FANNIE STEVENSON, Clerk. 

LOIS TRITTIPO, P. B. X. Operator. 

JESSIE KENNEDY, Typist. 



Secretary op State 5 

CERTIFICATE OF TITLE DEPARTMENT 

AUTO THEFT FUND 

ROBERT HUMES, Chief of Police. 
L. CUNNINGHAM, Chief Clerk. 
LILLIAN BERKLEY, Branch Cashier. 
INEZ WORDEN, Stenographer. 
JANE L AWT ON, Stenographer. 
DORIS CASLER, Stenographer. 
HELEN HARDIN, Number Clerk. 
EFFIE McGREW, File Clerk. 
GEORGIA BRANAMAN, File Clerk. 
ELLA CAMPBELL, File Clerk. 
LORAN HICKMAN, File Clerk. 
DAVID WILKINSON, File Clerk. 
WILLIAM E. JONES, Clerk. 
R. W. BOSART, Clerk. 
PHOEBE BONNER, Clerk. 
HELEN NEFF, File Clerk. 
LOLA RONK, Typist. 
JENNIE OBTOVER, Typist. 
LELA WACHSTETTER, Typist. 
MILDRED SIMPSON, Typist. 
ALICE WIRT, Typist. 
AGNES JOHANNIS, Typist. 
LOIS ROSEBAUM, Stenographer. 
GERTRUDE HULSMAN, Typist. 
PEARL CRUTCHFIELD, Typist. 
SHIRLEY CRONE, Typist. 
DELLA FOX, Clerk. 
RAY JACKSON, Clerk. 
RICHARD NASH, Janitor. 

REGISTRATION OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

Every person who is the owner of a motor vehicle is required to 
register with the Secretary of State by making application on blanks 
furnished for that purpose, giving his name, postoffice and street or 
rural address and the county in which he lives. He must give the name 
of his motor vehicle, year in which it was made, model, engine number, 
serial number, number of cylinders, size of bore, horse power, and the 
number of his certificate of title. He is then required to sign the appli- 
cation and have his signature acknowledged by a notary public or other 
officer authorized to administer oaths. A certificate is given the owner 
as evidence of ownership of the license, and the same is to be displayed 
in a metal container to be furnished by the Secretary of State for fee 
of fifty cents. The container must be attached in the driver's compart- 
ment of the motor vehicle, or carried in the tool box or other receptacle 
in a motorcycle. Upon payment of the proper fee, metal license plates 
are furnished the owner, which must be displayed on both the front 



6 Year Book 

and the rear of motor vehicle. All licenses expire on the 31st day of 
December and must be renewed annually. 

License numbers preceded by the letter "M" are issued to manu- 
facturers and dealers and are to be used on all cars used for demon- 
strating and testing purposes only. Service cars and motor vehicles 
used by individuals for personal use require the regular license plates. 

Licenses are issued for motorcycles in the same manner, the appli- 
cant giving a description of the motorcycle on proper blanks furnished 
for that purpose. However, only one license plate is issued for each 
motorcycle and the number is preceded by the letter "X." 

Chauffeurs' licenses are issued upon receipt of proper application 
accompanied by two photographs of the applicant. The application must 
also be signed by two disinterested persons, certifying as to the good 
character of the applicant. 

Licenses may be transferred from one car to another when owned 
by the same person, but under no circumstances are they transferable 
from one owner to another. 

In case a license plate is lost, stolen, mutilated or destroyed, a 
duplicate may be secured by making application on proper blank. Fee 
$1.00. 

Rebates will be granted on licenses for the unearned portion of the 
fee, when the motor vehicle has been disposed of and the owner does 
not desire to have the plates transferred to another car, provided the 
license plates are returned to the Secretary of State marked "for rebate" 
and accompanied by properly executed application for rebate. 

Two file systems are maintained for the convenience of the public, 
one being numerical according to numbers of licenses issued, and the 
other alphabetically arranged by counties. 

The 1919 General Assembly amended Section 6 of the 1913 Motor 
Vehicle Law, thereby providing a separate classification for trucks and 
trailers. Application for trucks and delivery car licenses should be 
made on a distinctive form for that purpose, and the fees are applied 
according to the carrying capacity of the truck or delivery car. Trailer 
licenses are secured by application on a distinctive form and the fees 
are based on the carrying capacity of the trailer. No truck or trailer 
of more than seven and one-half tons capacity is permitted on the high- 
ways of the state. 

The legislature also passed an act creating a State Highway Com- 
mission, providing for the construction, reconstruction, maintenance, re- 
pair and control of public highways. This act also provides that the 
net revenue derived from license fees shall, on and after January 1, 
1920, be turned over to the State Highway Fund to be used for road 
construction and repairs. 

The following table gives the schedule of annual registration and 
license fees applicable to motor vehicles according to horsepower and 
tonnage capacity, agreebly to an act of the General Assembly of 1921: 

PASSENGER CARS 

Electrics (other than trucks) . $5 00 

Less than 25-horsepower 5 00 

25-horsepower and less than 40-horsepower 8 00 



Secretary of State 7 

40-horsepower and less than 50-horsepower 20 00 

50-horsepower or more 30 00 

TRUCKS 

Less than one ton capacity $6 00 

1 ton capacity and less than 2 tons 15 00 

2 tons capacity and less than Sy 2 tons 25 00 

sy 2 tons capacity and less than 5 tons 50 00 

5 tons capacity and not exceeding 7% tons 75 00 

No truck of more than 7% tons capacity will be permitted on the highways of 
the state. 

TRAILERS 

Less than one ton capacity. $3- 00 

1 ton capacity and less than 2 tons 6 00 

2 tons capacity and less than 5 tons 10 00 

5 tons capacity and not exceeding 7% tons 20 00 

No trailer of more than 7% tons capacity will be permitted on the highways of 
the state. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Manufacturers' and dealers' licenses $25 00 

Additional duplicate dealer's license plates, per set 1 00 

Mortorcycle license 2 00 

Chauffeur's license 2 00 

Duplicate lost, stolen or mutilated license plates 1 00 

The above fees apply to all applications except for duplicate license 
plates, made prior to August 1st of each year. After August 1st the 
license fee is one-half the above rates. 



AUTOMOBILE LICENSE DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 

Statement of Eeceipts and Disbursements of the Road Fund Fiscal 
Year from October 1, 1921, to September 30, 1922. 

RECEIPTS 

Passenger cars ; $2,168,160 50 

Trucks 637,102 50 

Dealers' licenses 40,831 50 

Motorcycle licenses , 12,173 00 

Chauffeurs' licenses 29,627 00 

Trailer licenses 8,386 50 

Duplicate license plates 15,368 00 

Transfers 61,708 00 

*Notary fees 9,711 00 

Interest 47,909 46 

Gross receipts $3,030,977 46 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Fixed Charges 

Tags and badges $72,763 42 

Rebates 25,418 30 

$98,181 72 

*Notary fees, previously turned into the General Fund, were made a part of the 
Road Fund by Act of 1921 General Assembly. 



8 Year Book 

Current Expenses 

Salaries $40,633 65 

Postage 17,105 37 

Printing and supplies 8,231 47 

Office fixtures 460 50 

Office expense 12,084 45 

78,515 44 

Total disbursements $176,697 16 

TOTAL RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS AND DISTRIBUTION 

Automobile License Department — 1914 to 1922 

Year Receipts Disbursements Distribution 

1914 $432,301 57 $51,201 56 $381,104 02 

1915 598,113 72 51,640 00 546,473 72 

1916 825,847 18 69,149 57 756,697 61 

1917 1,109,113 26 68,756 95 1,040,356 31 

1918 1,307,134 31 86,301 87 1,220,832 44 

1919 1,568,657 44 107,214 27 1,461,443 17 

1920 2,029,103 00 110,046 08 *1,919,798 67 

1921 f 2,379,170 16 fl30,259 17 f2,305,545 46 

1922 $3,030,977 46 $176,697 16 $2,854,280 30 

*Period from January 1 to September 30, 1920. 

fFiscal year from October 1, 1920, to September 30, 1921. 

$Fiscal year from October 1, 1921, to September 30, 1922. 

NUMBER OF LICENSES ISSUED 

1914 to 1922 

Year Automobiles Trucks Dealers Motorcycles Chauffeurs Trailers 

1914 66,410 511 10,403 2,769 

1915 96,615 727 11,225 3,099 

1916 139,117 997 11,217 4,362 

1917 192,195 1,121 10,315 5,063 

1918 227,160 990 9,112 4,642 

1919 277,255 1,192 8,895 6,410 

1920 294,338 31,654 1,537 8,664 9,382 

1921 357,025 43,317 1,569 7,524 11,360 1,851 

*1922 404,062 55,327 1,696 7,269 15,768 2,412 

*Number issued at end of fiscal year, September 30, 1922. 

CERTIFICATE OF TITLE DEPARTMENT 

The General Assembly of 1921 enacted a law providing that no cer- 
tificate of registration of any motor vehicle or license plates shall be 
issued by the Secretary of State, unless the applicant be granted an 
official Certificate of Title for such motor vehicle. Application for cer- 
tificate of title shall be on blank form provided for that purpose, and 
shall be acknowledged before a notary public or other officer empowered 
to administer oaths, and shall contain a full description of the motor 
vehicle and of any liens or encumbrances upon said motor vehicle. The 
Secretary of State -shall use reasonable diligence in ascertaining whether 
or not the facts stated in said application for certificate of title are 
true, and if satisfied that the applicant is the lawful owner or is other- 
wise entitled to have same registered in his name, he shall thereupon 



Secretary of State 9 

issue an appropriate certificate of title. Said certificate of title shall 
contain the name and address of the applicant and a full description 
of the motor vehicle together with a statement of any liens or encum- 
brances which the application may show to be thereon. Space is pro- 
vided on the reverse side of the certificate of title for assignment of 
the motor vehicle when the same is sold or traded. The fee for such 
certificate of title is fifty cents. The certificate of title is valid so long 
as the motor vehicle is owned by the person whose name appears on 
such certificate. When the motor vehicle is disposed of, the holder of 
certificate of title shall assign same to the purchaser of the motor vehicle, 
and the purchaser shall make a new application for certificate of title 
and forward same to the automobile department with the assigned title. 
The fee for such transfer of title is fifty cents. The fees collected from 
the issuing of certificates of title are used for the administration of the 
act and the recovery of stolen automobiles and the apprehension of 
thieves. 

The following receipts and disbursements have been made from the 
Certificate of Title Department for the six months period from June 
1st to September 30, 1921: 

Receipts $365,973 75 

Disbursements 108,444 73 

Balance on hand September 30, 1921 $257,529 02 

Receipts fiscal year October 1, 1921, to September 30, 1922 $181,351 78 

Disbursements fiscal year October 1, 1921, to September 30, 1922.. 119,878 00 

61,473 78 



Balance on hand September 30, 1922 $319,002 80 

MOTOR VEHICLE POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Section 6 of the Certificate of Title Act provides that the Secretary 
of State, with the approval of the Governor, is authorized to appoint 
necessary deputies, in addition to the present officers of the law, to carry 
out the provisions of the certificate of title act, who shall have power 
to investigate and follow up any auto theft matters or other violations 
of the said act, and shall have all authority of peace officers relative to 
the provisions of the certificate of title act. They also are required to 
assist in ascertaining whether the owners and operators of motor vehicles 
are carrying the license tags which they are by law required to carry. 

The state motor vehicle police number seventeen members, who are 
salaried as provided by the certificate of title act. Thirty additional 
members of the state motor vehicle police department are attached to 
municipal police departments and do not draw salaries from the state. 

Under the operation of the state motor vehicle police for the period 
from July 15, 1921, until September 30, 1922, 225 motor vehicles have 
been recovered and returned to the owners in this state. One hundred 
twenty-five persons have been arrested by the state motor vehicle police 
and practically all pleaded guilty to the charge of vehicle taking. 



10 Year Book 

REPORT OF THE INDIANA SECURITIES COMMISSION 

THE COMMISSION 

ED JACKSON, Secretary of State. 
ORA DAVIES, Treasurer of State. 
U. S. LESH, Attorney General. 

THE ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENT 

MAURICE L. MENDENHALL, Administrator. 
HERMAN B. GRAY, Assistant Administrator. 
HERBERT J. MILLIES, Auditor. 
JENNIE V. LAMB, License Clerk. 
MARGARET FERGUSON, Stenographer. 

The Indiana Securities Commission has been in existence approxi- 
mately two years. If the flotation of fraudulent securities in the State 
of Indiana has decreased, if confidence in securities as investments has 
increased, if legitimate business has benefited, then the enactment of 
the Indiana Securities Law by the special session of the legislature of 
1920 will stand as a landmark in the industrial, commercial and financial 
development of the state. 

The readers of this report are invited to determine this question 
for themselves by comparing the conditions of today with those existing 
prior to the enactment of this law. 

The Indiana law is not perfect. There will be, however, an earnest 
effort made to remedy certain defects in existing legislation at the 1923 
session of the legislature. These defects are very slight and only actual 
experience in administration of the law have made them apparent. 

SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR YEAR ENDING SEP- 
TEMBER 30, 1922 
Receipts — 

Filing fees $36,435 54 

Disbursements — 

Payroll $11,205 00 

Legal proceedings 

Equipment, office 

Printing 

Postage 

Stationery, supplies, etc 

Examinations 

Miscellaneous 

Balance October 1, 1922 



152 


90 


748 


80 


906 


31 


352 


00 


175 


78 


814 


58 


473 


46 


21,606 


71 



$36,435 54 $36,435 54 

LICENSES 

Issuers' licenses granted 301 ; rejected 53 

Dealers' licenses granted 137 ; rejected 3 

Salesmen's licenses granted 1,027 ; rejected 3 

Agents' licenses granted 446 ; rejected 10 

Total amount of issues authorized $101,275,508 00 

Total amount of issues rejected 8,867,000 00 

Number of issuers' applications received 350 

Number of dealers' applications received 145 

Number of companies claiming exemption 290 

Number of geological, auditors, examinations, etc., were made 40 

Number of official meetings held 48 



Secretary of State 



11 



PRIMARY ELECTION RETURNS, MAY 2, 1922 

United States Senators. 



Counties 



Adams 

Allen 

Bartholomew. 

Benton 

Blackford 



Boone. . 
Brown. . 
Carroll. 
Cass . . . 
Clark.. 



Clay 

Clinton. . . 
Crawford . 



Dearborn . 



Decatur . . 
Dekalb... 
Delaware . 
Dubois . . . 
Elkhart. . . 



Fayette. . 
Floyd 
Fountain . 
Franklin. 
Fulton . . 



Gibson . . . 

Grant 

Greene . . . 
Hamilton. 
Hancock. . 



Harrison — 
Hendricks. . . 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington . 



Jackson. . 
Jasper. . . 

Jay 

Jefferson. 



Johnson . . 

Knox 

Kosciusko . 



Lake. 



Laporte . . 
Lawrence . 



Marion. . 
Marshall. 



Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery. 
Morgan 



Newton 
Noble.. 
Ohio... 
Orange . 
Owen . . 



492 
1,845 
2,025 
1,161 
1,122 

2,212 
278 
1,332] 
2,531 
1,765 

1,521 
2,166 

618 
2,202 

763 

2,258 
1,594 
4,982 
311 
3,620 

1,785 
1,468 
1,826 
794 
1,418 



3,871 
2,768 
3,705 

1,282 

1,756 
2,856 
2.940 
3,907 
1,967 

1,100 
1,605 
1,878 
1,733 
1,375 

1,711 
1,954 
2,582 
1,422 
12,261 

2,278 
2,629 
5,166 
21,457 
1,280 

1,022 
1,995 
2,473 
2,222 
2,211 

1,109 
1,190 
HT299 
1,729 
1,054 



,P4 

m - 



647 
2,952 
1,855 
1,466 

553 

972 
97 

739 
2,044 
■ 595 

1,874 
1,367 
756 
1,585 
1,103 

1,341 

1,523 

3,982 

443 

1,848 

1,385 
1,228 
1,523 
490 
1,274 

1,759 
4,138 
1,946 
2,369 
593 

1,185 
1,840 
3,444 
3,983 
2,071 



1,899 

972 

2,760 

1,267 

1,163 
2,410 
3,388 
1,678 
9,276 

3,130 
1,942 
2,352 
24,690 
1,197 

623 
1,155 
1,708 
2,252 
1,177 

995 
1,852 

264 
1,520 

926 



o 



111 

353 
132 
74 
130 

76 
100 

63 
285 
516 



111 

120 
183 



77 
138 

67 
503 
119 

24 
145 

82 

244 

97 



267 
21 
111 

152 
93 
29 
92 

203 

241 
40 

116 
80 

77 

110 

262 
21 
25 

123 

281 
15 
234 
163 
112 

138 
172 
93 
90 

56 

42 
86 
45 
45 



s a 



222 
1,777 

237 
51 
84 

165 

118 
101 
919 
524 

711 
112 
172 
226 
237 

137 
761 
189 
747 
223 

82 



231 



256 
98 
392 

72 
284 

185 
93 
60 
126 
353 

337 
41 
274 
122 
119 

323 

778 
136 
36 
108 



pq 



191 
728 
314 
51 
164 

147 
104 
104 
789 
529 

280 
163 
120 
190 
211 

119 

256 
112 
410 

475 

58 

505 

99 

262 
277 

227 
,494 
314 

87 
278 

321 
34 
45 
132 
321 

261 
52 

206 
89 

104 

283 
461 
340 
47 
253 



735 


714 


180 


93 


761 


445 


3,990 


480 


226 


533 


133 


145 


354 


356 


276 


151 


123 


156 


145 


121 


59 


63 


139 


184 


44 


30 


110 


127 


155 


116 



MS 

"a5_2 

t/2 



1,917 
3,749 
2,961 
544 
1,270 

3,292 
912 
1,283 
3,670 
2,644 

2,926 
2,122 
1,088 
1,967 
2,333 

1,512 
1,720 
1,399 
2,666 
1,386 

773 
2,664 
1,729 
2,212 
1,488 

2,052 
1,265 
3,113 
1,446 



2,271 
1,550 
1,587 
1,369 
2,102 

2,509 

680 

2,101 

1,886 
1,290 

3,714 

3,160 

1,476 

233 

575 

1,449 
1,157 
6,115 
9,220 
1,589 



3,097 
1,762 
2,086 
1,882 

580 

1,054 

441 

991 

1,930 



12 Year Book 

PRIMARY ELECTION RETURNS FOR UNITED STATES SENATORS-Continued. 



Counties 



Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph... 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

Steuben 

St. Joseph . . 

Sullivan 

Switzerland . 
Tippecanoe. 
Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh 
Vermillion . . 
Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick .... 
Washington. 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley.... 

Total. . . 



"Si 

<3 



2,322 
853 
724 

3,200 
677 



1,954 
4,095 



193 



2,122 
1,573 

848 
1,461 

3,056 



4,195 
1,258 

747 
4,513 

1,482 
6,056 

2,972 
1,293 
1,185 
1,220 

4,822 

874 

1,080 

485 



206, 165 






1,908 

604 

1,256 

2,115 

907 

635 
1,654 
2,074 
1,299 
1,570 

626 
1,036 
1,673 

993 
2,059 

3,698 
974 
927 

5,034 
857 

619 
5,742 
1,731 
4,304 

2,189 
1,245 
1,319 

767 

3,006 

894 

1,450 

1,185 



184,505 



sig 



67 
207 
123 

20 
165 

103 
135 
11 

144 

72 

70 
199 
58 
84 
16 

454 
148 
199 
56 
234 

50 

196 

48 
264 

111 

16 
186 
137 

88 
94 
69 
99 



12,152 



Q 

i 



«>; 
"2"! 



185 
318 
114 
27 
455 

148 

445 

41 

183 

83 

149 

460 

163 

80 

36 

361 
712 
95 
159 
141 

60 

2,231 

348 

5,385 

128 

14 

269 

186 

264 
217 



34,027 



71 
228 
133 

56 
214 

221 
163 

37 
137 

93 

135 

372 

363 

179 

25 

611 
289 
145 
75 
162 

85 
440 
151 

536 

222 
15 
199 

277 

168 
268 
139 



22,099 



o to 



1,026 

1,427 

885 

243 

2,248 



3,578 

955 

1,657 

1,506 

1,301 

3,770 

1,706 

678 

426 

2,326 
2,921 
1,236 
354 
1,626 

445 
2,831 
1,284 
4,633 

1,701 

248 

2,128 

2,374 

1,207 
2,431 
1,027 
1,654 



174,623 



109 
145 
174 
39 
153 

141 
177 

31 
123 

73 

74 
279 
141 



229 
517 
123 
912 



66 
231 

149 
709 

164 
47 
122 
204 



215 
224 
406 



24,428 



Albert J. Beveridge, Indianapolis. Samuel M. Ralston, Indianapolis. 



*The Primary Election Returns given in this table are all taken from the official records in the office of the 
Secretary of State except the vote cast for state senator, state representatives, circuit and superior judge and 
prosecuting attorney in districts composed of a single county, which are not submitted to the secretary of state 
and are compiled from reports obtained direct from the clerks of the circuit courts of the several counties. 

REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 
First District. 



Counties 


Oscar R. 
Luhring, R. 


Edward E. 
Meyer, D. 


William E. 
Wilson, D. 


D. C Ste- 
phenson, D. 




2,559 
1,669 
1,271 
2,112 
7,518 
2,085 


966 

514 
1,178 

973 
3,580 

668 


1,844 
705 
1,881 
1,101 
2,219 
1,931 


332 


Pike 


173 




172 




291 




353 




277 






Total 


17,214 


7,879 


9,681 


1,598 







William E. Wilson, Evansville. 
Oscar R. Luhring, Evansville. 



Secretary of State 

REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS-Continued. 
Second District 



13 



Counties 


Oscar E. 
Bland, R. 


Raleigh L. 
Morgan, R. 


James M. 
House, R. 


Mrs. W. A. 
Cullop, D. 


Arthur H. 

Greenwood, 

D. 


Will H. 
Pigg, D. 


Knox 


3,247 
1,950 
3,237 
4,351 
1,689 
3,098 
1,307 
3,254 


89 

39 
101 
131 

64 
436 

50 
152 


1,106 
211 
681 
376 
237 
573 
324 
377 


1,950 

1,075 
272 
993 
617 
874 
400 
403 


2,631 
1,416 

2,593 

2,748 

1,226 

913 

967 

480 


665 
2,550 
150 
785 
538 
613 
344 
1,534 


















Total 


22,133 


1,062 


3,885 


6,584 


12,974 


7,179 





Arthur H. Greenwood, Washington. 
Oscar E. Bland, Linton. 



Third District 



Counties 


Samuel A. 
Lambdin, R. 


John W. 
Ewing, D. 


R. C. 
Brown, D. 




2,614 

603 


836 
3,684 

796 
1,400 
2,221 
2,364 
2,839 
3,624 
4,600 
1,398 


606 




1,025 
406 






1,094 

793 

1,409 


298 




247 




790 




392 


Floyd 


2,390 


611 


Clark 


1,207 


Scott 


975 


289 






Total 


9,878 


23,762 


5,871 







Samuel A. Lambdin, English. 
John W. Ewing, New Albany. 



Fourth District 



Counties 


John S. 
Benham, R. 

■ 


Clarence E. 
Custer, D. 


Harry C. 
Canfield, D. 






1,673 
637 

1,533 
728 
623 

1,136 
364 
953 

1,552 

2,129 
777 


1,997 




240 
3,027 
1,992 
2,045 
1,563 

474 
1,231 


870 




2,230 




1,009 




1,765 




2,403 


Ohio 


254 




961 




802 




1,881 


2,446 




1,201 








Total 


12,453 


12,105 


15,938 







John S. Benham, Benham. 
Harry C. Canfield, Batesville. 



14 



Year Book 



REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS— Continued. 
Fifth District 



Counties 


Everett 
Sanders, R. 


Alfred D. 
Merrell, D. 


Charles H. 
Bidaman, D. 


David B. 

Hostetter, 

D. 


Albert R. 
Owens, D. 


Otto T. 

Englehart, 

D. 


Jacob E. 
Cravens, D. 


Clay.. 


3,156 


403 
134 
181 
332 
260 
662 


375 

93 

78 

136 

357 

6,446 


869 

513 

409 

2,470 

584 
672 


431 
53 
366 
480 
299 
2,204 


2,080 
271 
279 
487 
276 
951 


210 
466 


Parke 

Putnam. . .. 


3,563 
3,250 


99 
460 
154 


Vigo 


8,688 


546 


Total . . 


18,657 


1,972 


7,485 


5,517 


3,833 


4,344 


1,935 



Everett Sanders, Terre Haute. 
Charles H. Bidaman, Terre Haute. 



Sixth District 





Richard N. 


Charles O. 


Ralph 


Walter 


Edward C. 


Walter C. 


James A. 


Counties 


Elliott, R. 


Williams, R. 


Test, R. 


McConaha, 
R. 


Eikman, D. 


Reese, D. 


Clifton, D. 


Fayette 


2,198 


248 


351 


232 


132 


56 


803 


Franklin 


609 


153 


233 


244' 


1,105 


531 


281 


Hancock — 


772 


276 


473 


202 


1,495 


835 


1,135 


Henry 


2,490 


451 


3,008 


230 


239 


542 


809 


Rush 


2,236 


533 


589 


165 


638 


319 


760 


Shelby 


1,749 


423 


501 


133 


912 


2,441 


1,506 


Union 


653 


131 


230 


349 


102 


73 


611 


Wayne 


2,749 


1,716 


1,131 


2,257 


300 


543 


739 


Total . . 


13,456 


3,931 


6,516 


3,812 


4,923 


5,340 


6,644 



Richard N. Elliott, Connersville. 
James A. Clifton, Connersville. 



Seventh District 



Counties 


Merrill 
Moores, R. 


Franklin 
McCray, R. 


John W. 
Becker, R. 


Frank 

Hollingshead, 

R. 


Joseph P. 
. Turk, D. 


Woodburn 
Masson, D. 




18,256 


9,502 


7,695 


716 


8,596 


4,937 






Total 


18,256 


9,502 


7,695 


716 


8,596 


4,937 







Merrill Moores, Indianapolis. 
Joseph P. Turk, Indianapolis. 



Eighth District 



Counties 


Charles A. 

Clevenger, 

R. 


Albert H. 
Vestal, R. 


Ernest Ben- 

ninghofen, 

R. 


Jesse H. 
Mellett, D. 


Claude C. 
Ball, D. 


John W. 
Tyndall, D. 




358 
812 
451 
145 
143 
75 


6,583 

7,144 
5,153 
2,564 
1,435 

875 


360 
304 
233 

82 
91 

85 


3,606 
105 
151 
497 
336 
136 


2,252 

1,764 

635 

1,670 

1,008 

163 


2,083 
133 






192 




828 


Wells 


1 677 




3,568 




Total 


1,984 


23,754 


1,155 


4,831 


7,492 


8,481 





Albert H. Vestal, Anderson. 
John W. Tyndall, Decatur. 



Secretary of State 



15 



REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS-Continued. 
Ninth District 



Counties 



Fred S. 
Purnell, R. 



Walter H. 
Unversaw, R. 



Robert H. 
Kinney, D. 



George Lee 
Moffett, D. 



Fountain . . . 
Montgomery 

Boone 

Clinton 

Carroll 

Tipton 

Hamilton . . . 
Howard .... 

Total. . . 



2,907 
3,960 
2,815 
2,890 
1,881 
1,674 
4,674 
5,241 



425 
269 
278 
573 
101 
333 
738 
2,501 



450 
1,399 
1,720 
1,408 

743 
1,291 

643 
1,033 



2,359 

1,325 

1,924 

1,414 

913 

794 

949 

632 



26,042 



5,218 



,687 



10,310 



Fred S. Purnell, Attica. 
George Lee Moffett, Yeddo. 



Tenth District 



Counties 


Elwood 

Washington, 

R. 


William R. 
Wood, R. 


Will B. 

Anderson, 

R. 


Gust. 
Strom, R. 


William F. 
Spooner, D. 




87 
221 
915 

78 
175 
298 
121 
125 


2,256 
2,503 
8,946 
1,499 
2,789 
7,577 
1,939 
2,046 


244 

419 

. • 6,324 

266 

1,320 

1,161 

314 

249 


77 

290 

3,685 

173 

1,047 

273 

85 

142 


840 








872 




843 




337 




1,304 




236 


White 


1,408 






Total 


2,020 


29,555 


10,297 


5,772 


5,840 







William R. Wood, Lafayette. 
William F. Spooner, Valparais 



Eleventh District 



Counties 


Milton 
Kraus, R. 


Samuel E. 
Cook, D. 


Nelson G. 
Hunter, D. 


Harry K. 

Cuthbertson 

D. 




1,222' 


1,111 
3,256 
1,582 
2,266 
1,100 
848 
417 


208 
793 
589 
574 
415 
187 
1,464 


422 




2,178 




6,319 
3,640 


675 




836 




2,816 




1,386 


563 


Wabash .• 


508 


Total ■ 


12,567 


10,580 


4,230 


7,998 







Milton Kraus, Peru. 

Samuel E. Cook, Huntington. 



16 



Year Book 



REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS— Continued. 
Twelfth District 



Counties 


Louis W. 
Fairfield, R. 


Charles R. 
Lane R. 


Reuben Earl 
Peters, D. 


Cyrus Ellis 
Gallatin, D. 


Charles W. 

Branstrator, 

D. 


Allen 


2,929 
2,711 
2,451 
2,389 
3,201 
1,222 


1,590 
411 
418 
579 
381 
414 


2,714 
991 
144 
609 
231 
844 


963 
1,373 

51 
281 

77 
329 


4,759 
785 
174 
810 
214 

1,284 


Dekalb 




Noble 




Whitley 




Total 


14,903 


3,793 


5,533 


3,074 


8,026 





Louis W. Fairfield, Angola. 

Charles W. Branstrator, Fort Wayne, R. 



Thirteenth District 



Counties 


Andrew J. 
Hickey, R. 


Esther Kath- 
leen O'Keefe, 
D. 


Frank 
Fenton, D. 


Henry F. 

Schricker, 

D. 


Harry E. 
Grube, D. 


Elkhart 


4,665 
2,194 


753 

894 

815 

1,221 

1,876 

172 

1,631 


542 
293 
353 
1,033 
142 
39 
525 


311 
526 
216 
658 
173 
973 
630 


641 




413 




742 




4,791 
2,152 
1,720 
5,535 


979 




715 




57 




1 034 






Total 


21,057 


7,362 


2,927 


3,487 


4,581 





Andrew J. Hickey, Laporte. 

Esther Kathleen O'Keefe, Plymouth. 



STATE SENATORS. 



Counties 


No. 
Elected 


Republicans 


Vote 


Democrats 


Vote 


St. Joseph. . . 


1 


Arthur B. Hunter, South Bend 

Helen M. Anderson, Mishawaka . . 
M. T. Calef, South Bend 


2,135 

2,107 

1,887 


Chester A. Perkins, South Bend. . . 
Edwin H. Sommerer, South Bend . . 


1,686 
1,426 










1 




7,149 
3,772 
2,605 
6,022 


Frank R. Martin, Hammond 


734 




Erie G. Sproat, Hammond 

Willis E. Roe, East Chicago 










Allen 


1 


William E. Bowers, New Haven. . . 
Edwin G. Ludwig, Fort Wayne. . . 


2,520 
1,041 


Robert B. Shirley, Woodburn, R. 2 


4,868 


Grant 


1 


Culla J. Vayhinger, Upland, R. 1. . 


4,353 
3,655 


Ora C. King, Marion, R. 5 


1,320 








Marion 


1 
1 


Thomas A. Daily, Indianapolis. . . . 
Charles A. Messmore, Indianapolis 
Wilbur A. Royse, Indianapolis .... 
Gustav G. Schmidt, Indianapolis. . 

John McGregor, Indianapolis 

Joseph G. Hayes, Indianapolis .... 
Herman L. Seeger, Indianapolis. . . 


9,953 
2,154 
5,077 
5,732 

3,728 

4,534 

807 


Albert A. Henry, Indianapolis 

William W. Spencer, Indianapolis . 


6,130 
5,672 


Wayne 


Denver C. Harlan, Cambridge 
City, R R. . 


3,792 
1,353 
2,830 


Mrs. Lillie M. Tweedy, Cambridge 
City 


1,387 




Walter S. Ratliff, Richmond, R.R. 
John W. Judkins, Cambridge City 







Secretary of State 
joint state senators. 



17 



Counties 


Nathan Hoyt 

Sheppard, 

R. 


William 
Brown, R. 


George W. 

Thompson, 

D. 


Porter 


1,310 
964 
433 
246 


3,720 
2,355 
1,468 
1,221 


308 


Jasper 


Newton 


830 
1,420 


Pulaski 




Total 


2,953 


8,764 


2,558 





William Brown, Hebron. 
George W. Thompson, Winamac. 



Counties 


William H. 
Kissinger, R. 


Oliver 
Kline, R. 


John C. 
Crosby, D. 


Whitley 


839 
1,818 


772 
2,099 


2,115 
3,165 


Huntington 




Total 


2,657 


2,871 


5,280 





Oliver Kline, Huntington, R. 3. 
John C. Crosby, Huntington. 



Counties 


Grant 
Pyle, R. 


George L. 
Saunders, D. 


Adams 


696 


1,991 


Wells 




1,078 


1,363 




Total 


1,774 


3,354 





Grant Pyle, Bluffton. 
George L. Saunders, Bluffton. 



Counties 


William S. 
Mercer, R. 


Homer 
Fenters, R. 


Ethan A. 
Graves, D. 


James P. 
Davis, D. 




965 
4,304 


2,134 

2,728 


1,983 
455 


2 141 




1,201 




Total 


5,269 


4,862 


2,438 


3,342 





William S. Mercer, Peru. 
James P. Davis, Kokomo. 



Counties 


Lawrence R. 

Cart wright, 

R. 


W. Edward 
Ayers, D. 




2,200 


2,193 














Total 


2,200 


2,193 







Lawrence R. Cartwright, Portland, R. 5. 
W. Edward Ayers, Portland. 



2—22978 



18 



Year Book 

JOINT STATE SENATORS— Continued. 



Counties 


John S. 

Alldredge, 

R. 


Walter S. 

Chambers, 

D. 


Sparks L. 
Brooks, D. 






3,953 
1,356 
1,639 


3,402 
283 






Hancock 


1,345 


1 655 






Total 


1,345 


6,948 


5,340 





John S. Alldredge, Anderson. 
Walter S. Chambers, Newcastle. 



Counties 


Murray S. 
Barker, R. 


Cassius M. 
Gentry, R. 


Joseph W. 
Klotz, D. 


Tipton 


1,008 
1,838 
2,658 


825 

3,438 

371 
















Total 


5,504 


4,637 









Murray S. Barker, Thorntown. 
Joseph W. Klotz, Noblesville. 



Counties 


RoyC. 
Street, R. 


Alva O. 
Reser, R. 


Ray M. 

Southworth, 

R. 


John 
Lackey, D. 




1,188 
2,934 


735 

2,775 


645 
3,727 


852 




1,379 






Total 


4,122 


3,510 


4,372 


2,231 







Ray M. Southworth, Lafayette. 
John Lackey, Oxford. 



Counties 


Howard 
O'Neal!, R. 


Charles 

Kirkpatrick, 

R. 


Benjamin F. 
Johnson, R. 


Andrew E. 
Durham, D. 




2,424 
1,890 


1,059 
726 


870 
847 


2,207 




4,079 






Total 


4,314 


1,785 


1,717 


6,386 







Howard O'Neall, Crawfordsville. 
Andrew E. Durham, Greencastle. 



Counties 


Weldon 
Lambert, R. 


George P. 
Cline, D. 


Jess E. 
Stevens, D. 






127 
1,303 
1,095 
1,779 


676 






1,410 






715 




3,105 


1,473 






Total 


3,105 


4,304 


4,274 







Weldon Lambert, Columbus. 

George P. Cline, College Corner, Ohio. 



Secretary of State 

JOINT STATE SENATORS— Continued. 



19 



Counties 


Charles E. 
Watson, R. 


David N. 
Curry, D. 


Charles S. 
Batt, D. 


George Ira 
Kisner, D. 




1,549 
6,273 


3,129 
1,526 


734 
6,905 


674 




2,088 






Total 


. 7,822 


4, 655 


7,639 


2,762 





Charles E. Watson. Sullivan, R. R. 
Charles S. Batt, Terre Haute. 



Counties 


Eugene C. 
Wharf, R 


Perry 
Easton, D. 


John A. 
Riddle, D. 






2,231 
1,372 


2,217 




3,015 


1,148 








Total 


3,015 


3,603 


3,365 







Eugene C. Wharf, Vincennes, R. R. 
Perry Easton, Sandborn. 



Counties 


Will K. 
Penrod, R. 


James B. 
Marshall, D. 




2,698 
1,434 


1,083 




> 


1,270 














Total 


4,132 


2,353 







Will K. Penrod, Loogootee. 
James B. Marshall, Shoals. 



Counties 


Frank V. 

McCullough, 

R. 


C.Pralle 
Erni, D. 








Floyd 


2,406 
880 


3,768 




1,072 








Total 


3,286 


4,840 







Frank V. McCullough, New Albany. 
C. Pralle Erni, New Albany. 



Counties 


OvidC. 

Richardson, 

R. 


Miles F. 

Daubenheyer, 

D. 


J. Francis 
Lockard, D. 


George C. 
Ale, D. 




1,892 
1,358 

1,878 




1,867 

1,273 

535 


401 






1,607 






1,075 








Total 


5,128 




3,675 


3,083 









Ovid C. Richardson, North Vernon. 
J, Francis Lockard, Milan. 



20 



Year Book 

JOINT STATE SENATORS— Continued. 



Counties 


Andrew M. 
Stevens, R. 


Joseph M. 
Cravens, D. 


Ohio 


414 
1,185 


511 


Switzerland 


1,663 


Jefferson 


Clark 














Total 


1,599 


2 174 







Andrew M. Stevens, Madison. 
Joseph M. Cravens, Madison, R. 3. 



Counties 


Norman B. 
Ficken, R. 


John 
Sweeney, D. 


J. Edwin 
Howe, D. 


Herbert J. 
Patrick, D. 


Peter L. 
Coble, D. 




599 

669 

1,538 


1,420 

863 
873 


578 
768 
563 


894 
815 
448 


2 104 




165 




573 






Total 


2,806 


3,156 


1,909 


2,157 


2,842 





Norman B. Ficken, Huntingburg. 
John Sweeney Tell City. 



Counties 


George 
Peed, R. 


Hovey C. 
Kirk, R. 


Harvey 
Harmon, D. 




1,609 
1,094 


1,944 
744 


2,362 


Pike 


1,204 






Total 


2,703 


2,689 


3,566 







George Peed, Hazleton, R. 3. 
Harvey Harmon, Princeton. 



Counties 


Roger D. 
Gough, R. 


Charles A. 
Fitch, Jr., D. 


Jacob 
Lutz, D. 




1,158 
6,476 
2,060 


1,228 

3,517 

462 


1,472 




1,734 




2,376 






Total 


9,694 


5,207 


5,582 







Roger D., Gough, Boonville. 
Jacob Lutz, Boonville. 



Secretary op State 



21 



STATE REPRESENTATIVES. 



County 


No. 
Elected 


Republicans 


Vote 


Democrats 


Vote 


Marion 


11 


Walther Lieber, Indianapolis 


7,572 


Peter A. Boland, Indianapolis 


5,162 






J. N. Hurty, Indianapolis 


11,053 


John M. Maxwell, Indianapolis . . . 


5,708 






Russell B. Harrison, Indianapolis. . 


7,452 


Edgar A. Perkins, Indianapolis — 


5,918 






Henry Abrams, Indianapolis 


8,741 


Jerry O'Connor, Indianapolis 


6,727 






Asa J. Smith, Indianapolis 


7,3,30 


Louis C. Schwartz, Indianapolis. . . 


5,522 






Elizabeth Rainey, Indianapolis — 


8,456 


George C. Stelhorn, Indianapolis. . 


4,650 






Ralph E. Updike, Indianapolis 


7,314 


Martin H. Walpole, Indianapolis. . 


6,192 






Clarence C. Wysong, Indianapolis . 


7,525 


J. Olias Vanier, Indianapolis 


4,805 






Frank J. Noll, Jr., Indianapolis . . . 


8,123 


William A. Taylor, Indianapolis. . . 


6,052 






Homer L. Traub, Indianapolis. . . . 


7,545 


Leo X. Smith, Indianapolis 


6,321 






Luke W. Duffey, Indianapolis 


8,358 


John C. Wagner, Indianapolis 


5,605 






Thomas M. Dexter, Indianapolis. . 


6,996 


John F. Linder, Indianapolis, R. R. 


v 






Asa R. Mathis, New Augusta, R. 1 


5,839 


Jl 


3,261 






John V. Allen, Indianapolis 


4,728 


Merica E. Hoagland, Indianapolis. 


3,229 






William Y. Hinkle, Indianapolis . . . 


5,398 


Henry H. Winkler, Indianapolis. . . 


4,452 






Warwick H. Ripley, Indianapolis.. 


2,258 


John W. Losh, Indianapolis 


4,066 






Edwin S. Mills, Indianapolis, R. R. 




Emit C. Spicklemire, Indianapolis. 


2,897 






0. Box 25 


4,739 


Alexandre Leon Asch, Indianapolis . 


4,446 






Russell V. Duncan, Indianapolis . . 


5,516 


John E. Webb, Indianapolis, R. D. 


3,750 






Edmond H. Herschel, Indianapolis. 


3,498 


Joseph G. Wood, Indianapolis .... 


4,183 






J. 0. Brown, Indianapolis 


3,108 


John E. Spiegel, Indianapolis 


4,575 






Wallace A. Robertson, Indianapolis 


2,948 


Raphael Schmidt, Indianapolis 


3,497 






Emil C. Stroeh, Indianapolis 


1,824 


Charles E. Young, Indianapolis . . . 


3,437 






George N. T. Gray, Indianapolis. . 


3,102 


Floyd E. Williamson, Indianapolis. 


4,164 






Charles W. Hughes, Indianapolis. . 


3,893 


Lewis Lee Michael, Indianapolis. . . 


3,281 






Ferdinand J. Montani, Indianapolis 


6,313 










W. Blaine Patton, Indianapolis — 


5,898 










Dante L. Conner, Indianapolis 


3,190 










Alexander Belle, Indianapolis 


2,018 










Donald G. Trone, Indianapolis 


2,960 










Frank C. Riley, Indianapolis. . 


3,327 










Fred A. Davidson, Indianapolis. . . 


4,540 










Wm. B. Waddell, Indianapolis. . . . 


3,224 










Leo C. Emmelmann, Indianapolis . 


3,742 










Louis A. Barth, Indianapolis. . 


2,809 










Omer U. Newman, Indianapolis. . . 


6,242 










Fae W. Patrick, Indianapolis 


3,195 










Anthony Klaiber, Indianapolis 


1,791 










William Gruner, Indianapolis 


3,633 










John H. Murray, Indianapolis. . . . 


4,037 










William F. Wilson, Indianapolis . . 


3,946 










Vinson H. Manifold, Indianapolis . 


5,543 










Robert H. Henry, Jr., Indianapolis 


3,163 










Charles W. Rollinson, Indianapolis 


2,687 










Homer Smay, Indianapolis 


1,511 










George Desautels, Indianapolis — 


5,176 










William E. Liebold, Indianapolis. . 


1,911 










Charles Mendenhall, Indianapolis . 


5,333 










Frank C. Huston, Indianapolis 


4,711 










Clyde P. Miller, Indianapolis 


4,850 










Howell Ellis, Indianapolis 


3,418 










S. J. Williams, Indianapolis 


2,581 










Roy E. Glidewell, Indianapolis — 


2,898 






Lake 


5 


John W. Thiel, Hobart 


7,426 


Thomas P. Mullinix, Gary 


578 






Oscar A. Ahlgren, Whiting 


8,083 


Lawrence Long, Hammond 


696 






James I. Day, E. Chicago 


8,247 


Karl D. Norris, E. Chicago 


624 






T frlpTm TTflrri^ Oarv 


8 834 


John A. Tokarz, Whiting 


609 






V. VXICIUJ. XXaLLla f VK*lj 

William M. Love, Hammond 


8,180 


Fred F. Henderlong, Crown Point. 


680 






Peter Boult, Gary 


3,304 










David T. Rosenthal, E. Chicago . . 


4,298 










Berthold M. Paulding, Gary 


3,837 










Herman L. Key, Gary 


6,619 










Willard B. Van Home, E. Chicago. 


5,147 










John W. Waggoner, Hammond — 


3,080 










Michael Havran, E. Chicago 


5,694 






Laporte 


1 


Charles W. Isenbarger, Lacrosse. . 


2,854 


Earl D. Brown, Michigan City 


1,536 






Charles H. DeWitt, Michigan City. 


1,787 


Karl A. Kanney, Michigan City . . . 
Catherine MacLean Walsh, Mich- 
igan City 


455 

885 




Thomas M. Herrold, Laporte, R. 9 


1,090 


Randolph . . . 


1 


Evert A. Addington, Farmland 


2,318 


Clarence Mullen, Winchester, R. 








George Shultz, Union City, R. 4 . . 
Milford A. Holloway, Farmland, 


2,211 


R 
















1 


R„3 


1,424 
5,473 


Thollie W. Druley, Boston, R. 1 . . 
James C. Hurst, Richmond 




Wayne 


James M. Knapp, Hagerstown 


800 
558 










John Marksbury, Richmond 


182 



22 



Year Book 



STATE REPRESENTATIVES— Continued. 



County 


No. 
Elected 


Republicans 


Vote 


Democrats 


Vote 




1 


Raymond C. Morgan, Knightstown 








Shelby 

Hendricks . . . 


1 




2,610 




4,441 


1 


Benjamin F. Davis, North Salem . . 
David B. Johnson, Mooresville 


'2,'w 


J. Russell Landreth, Lizton 


Morgan 


Jap Jones, Martinsville 


1,457 






Cyrus W. Mackenzie, Waverly . . . . 


1,101 


Felix O. Peckinpaugh, Martinsville. 


870 




1 
3 










Vigo 


George W. Sims, Terre Haute 


4,613 


Charles F. Riede, Terre Haute 


3,301 






Geo. S. Johnson, Terre Haute 


4,773 


James M. Carlos, Terre Haute 


4,848 






Frank W. Ray, Terre Haute 


5,686 


Edgar D. Fagin, Terre Haute, R.B. 


2,984 






George M. Dunn, Terre Haute. .. . 


2,874 


John G. Dwyer, Terre Haute 


1,326 






Fred K. Schaufler, Terre Haute. . . 


2,777 


Nicholas Weber, Terre Haute 


1,401 






Wilbur S. Chappelle, Terre Haute. 


2,288 


Miss Emma M. May, Terre Haute. 

John Hanretty, Terre Haute 

Joseph F. Boyer, Terre Haute .... 

Frank Miller, Terre Haute 

John C. Arnold, Terre Haute 

Michael J. Deasee, Terre Haute. . . 
Edgar L. Brown, Terre Haute 


2,940 
1,568 
2,242 
2,101 
1,963 
2,102 
1,826 


Parke 




Winfield Catlin, Rockviile 


2,311 


William L. Flock, near Blooming- 










1,961 




1,261 


Clay 






2,908 


Walter B. Ringo, Centerpoint, R. 
R. 1 








3,444 






John D. Hill, Shelburn 


1,558 




3,674 


Greene 




Elmer W. Sherwood, Linton 


2,813 


William J. Powell, Jasonville 


2,218 








365 


James B. Dillon, Switz City 


2,040 








624 








Clarence A. Loudermilk, Jason- 














751 


Harry M. Kenney, Bloomington . . 




Monroe 


E. Wm. G. Johnson, Bloomington, 


1,623 






R. 3 


2,024 










Claude G. Malott, Bloomington. . . 


1,993 






Bartholomew 




Wilbur L. Pruett, Columbus 

Frank A. Aldenhagen, Columbus, 


1,904 


John H. Schaefer, Columbus 


3,211 






R.R 


1,503 






Clark 




3,775 










Charles N. Finch, Jeff ersonville . . . 


2,593 


Floyd 




Chester V. Lorch, New Albany . . . 


2,380 


Herbert P. Kenny, New Albany. . . 
Clark F. Crecelius, New Albany . . . 
Albert L. Gerdon, New Albany . . . 
Ferd P. Wrege, New Albany 


1,527 
887 

1,197 
618 


Lawrence — 




John C. Sherwood, Mitchell, R. 1 . . 
Stephen M. Isom, Mitchell 


2,420 
1,814 










George L. Murdoch, Washington, 
R. R 






2,439 






1,590 
1,590 








Thomas Nugent, Washington 








Henry F. Voile, Freelandsville, R. 
F. D 










Arthur Johnson, Oakland City 




Gibson 


Claude A. Smith, Princeton 


3,157 


1,221 










Robert S. Boyle, Ft. Branch 


693 










J. Howard Thompson, Hazleton. . . 


1,212 


Vanderburgh 


3 


Thomas W. McCutchan, Evans- 












ville R 4 


5,506 
3,588 




2,955 






Henry E. Dreier, Evansville 


Edward R. Peters, Evansville, R. 






Harry E. Rowbottom, Evansville . 
Henrv W. Kamman, Evansville . . . 


5,502 


R. A 


3,292 






1,687 


Harry M. Punshon, Evansville 


2,765 






Charles Kares, Evansville, R. 7. . . 


2,371 


George B. Garrison, Evansville. . . . 


2,746 






Isadore J. Fine, Evansville 


770 










Alex M . Hestand, Evansville 


1,150 










Joseph Weimer, Evansville 


3,409 










B. F. Von Behren, Evansville 


2,479 






Tippecanoe . . 


1 


Elmer R. Waters, South Raub. . . . 


6,458 


John C. F. Redinbo, Lafayette, R. 








James Harold Porter, Lafayette. . . 
A. N. DuComb, South Bend 


1,956 


R.L 


1,421 


St. Joseph. . . 


3 


4,293 


Leo Van Hess, South Bend, R. 5 . . 


1,418 






Harry C. Matthews, South Bend, 




Thomas H. Jackson, South Bend. . 


1,821 






R. 6 


2,955 


August Bailey, South Bend 


2,172 






Leonard G. Jaqua, Mishawaka 


2,785 


Herman J. Weinke, South Bend. . . 


760 






Dayton D. Mangus, N. Liberty, R. 




Walter A. Rice, South Bend 


823 




1 


3 


3,771 
2,062 


Peter A. Beczkiewicz, South Bend. 
John W. Kitch, Plymouth 


1,314 


Marshall .... 


Henry L. Humrichouser, Plymouth 


2,325 


Elkhart 


2 


Paul D. Farley, Elkhart 


2,199 
1,894 


Herbert C. Waterman, Elkhart . . . 


1,111 




Floyd V Miller, Elkhart . . 


1,451 






Gene P. Ohmer, Elkhart, R. 7 . . . . 


1,132 


Donald C. McDougall, Goshen 


734 






Frank P. Abbott, Goshen 


1,657 










Victor D. Smith, Middlebury 


1,152 










William D. Ferris, Elkhart 


718 






Kosciusko . . . 


1 


Ezra W. Graham, Warsaw 


2,270 


George W. Irvine, Claypool 


826 






Charles W. Harlan, Warsaw 


1,541 


Victor H. Gawthrop, Leesburg 


779 






Floyd Stevens, near Sidney 


2,019 


Homer B. Sutherlin, Atwood 


576 



Secretary of State 

STATE REPRESENTATIVES— Continued. 



23 



County 


No. 
Elected 


Republicans 


Vote 


Democrats 


Vote 


Noble 

Dekalb 


1 

1 

3 

1 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

2 
2 


Bernard F. Haines, Avilla 

Arthur J. Stackhouse, Kendallville . 

John H. Hoffman, Ligonier 

Charles S. Arford, Edgerton, Ohio, 
R. R 


1,226 

649 

1,053 

2,785 

2,425 
2,715 
2,316 
1,806 

797 

698 

651 

No Opp. 

2,686 
2,212 
2,195 
1,572 
1,883 
763 
6,642 


James E. Luckey, Wolf Lake 

William H. Green, Ligonier 

Milo J. Thomas, Corunna 


1,074 
619 

1,032 
490 




Nathaniel C. Ross, Fort Wayne. . . 
Charles A. Phelps, Fort Wayne . . . 

Fred G. Duryee, Fort Wayne 

Clifford W. Siniff, Fort Wayne. . . . 

Truman G. Murden, Logansport. . 
Simeon J. Barney, Logansport .... 
Hiram J. Munger, Logansport. . . . 
Burton Green, Deedsville, R. 1 

George F. Ogden, Laketon 

Addison L. Martin, Lafontaine 

John P. Shutt, Warren, R. 3 

George W. Frazier, Warren 

John G. Hammitt, Bryant, R. 4. . . 

Alonzo C. Brown, Pennville 

Albert E. Shugart, Marion, R. 11. . 


Florance B. Smith, Garrett 

Cleve H. Grube, Butler 


874 
827 


Allen 


Arthur J. Ortlieb, Fort Wayne 

Howard M. Hobbs, Fort Wayne, 
R.R.ll 


2,008 
2,205 




Horace G. McDuffee, Churubusco, 
R. 1 


2,817 


Cass 


Grant Graham, Fort Wayne, R. 8. . 
Mayland E. Raquet, Fort Wayne. . 

Christ Hahn, Fort Wayne 

Peter L. Cassady, Fort Wayne 

August C. Nierman, Fort Wayne. . 
Edward A. Gruber, Fort Wayne. . . 

John M. Conroy, Fort Wayne 

Harvey C. Crabill, Monroeville. . . 

John W. Pugh, Logansport 

David C. Hubbs, Logansport 


1,195 
773 
1,926 
1,411 
1,795 
1,650 
1,703 
1,771 
3,465 
2,633 

3,073 


Wabash 

Huntington . . 


Thomas E. Bolley, Roann, R. 1 . . . 
Chester E. Troyer, Lafontaine. . . . 

Harvey Z. Collins, Huntington 

Isaiah Garwood, Huntington, R. 3. 
Wm. I. Journay, Portland, R. 4. . . 

John C. F. Graves, Pennville 

John A. Peterson, Swayzee 

Kenton G. Albright, Kokomo, R. 9 

Oliver J. Harshman, Frankfort, R. 

6 


975 
No Op. 

2,621 

807 

1,859 


Grant 


1,137 
1,306 


Cinton 


Marshall Thatcher, Frankfort 

Truman A. Goldsberry, Frankfort. 

Earle M. Myers, Kingman 

James C. Claypool, Veedersburg, 
R.4 


1,716 
1,704 

1,767 

1,469 
1,651 

1,312 
1,345 


1,569 


Fountain .... 


Frank Daywitt, Frankfort 

David L. Mabbitt, Franfort, R. 6. . 
Byron Monroe Allen, Kingman.. 

Frank D. Nolan, Crawfordsville, 
R. 6 : 


527 
767 

2,388 


Montgomery 


Walter B. Remley, Waynetown. . . 

James D. Wilson, New Richmond 

R.2 


1,806 




James B. Elmore, Waynetown, R. 
R.l 






Richard Lowe, Crawfordsville 


983 










Perry Johnson, Atlanta, R. 1 

Thomas B. Lindley, Westfield, R. 1 

Henry M. Cay lor, Noblesville 

Oscar F. Lydy, Noblesville 

James L. Bishop, Arcadia, R. 1. . . 
Walter Hunt, Noblesville, R. 7. . . . 
Caleb C. Williams, Pendleton, R. 3 
Wallace B. Campbell, Anderson. . . 
James M. Hundley, Summitville . . 
James L. Creson, Anderson 

Lemuel A. Pittenger, Selma, R. 1 . 


1,828 

603 

519 

749 

673 

1,493 

3,558 

3,292 

2,675 

1,399 

4,621 
3,819 
2,977 
3,019 






Madison 


John F. P. Thursten, Summitville. 
Myron H. Post, Anderson 


3,624 

2,836 

892 






2,210 


Delaware .... 


Roscoe V. Hodson, Anderson 

Edward J. Ronsheim, Anderson. . . 

George Laufer, Fortville, R.l 

Winfield S. Porter, Muncie 


1,877 
589 
1,087 
1,233 
1,202 




£Julia D. Nelson, Muncie 

JErnest C. Haynes, Muncie 







24 



Year Book 

state joint representatives. 



Counties 


William A. 
Hill, R. 


Arthur 0. 

J. Krieger, 

R. 


Jay J. 

Overmyer, 

R. 


John P. 
Kimmell, D. 




7,658 
1,005 


5,132 
2,042 


3,267 
2,015 


720 




293 






Total 


8,663 


7,174 


5,282 


1,013 





William A. Hill, Hammond. 
John P. Kimmell, McCool. 



Counties 


Isaac Harvey 
Hull, R. 


Lemuel 
Darrow, D. 




3,965 
1,644 


2,939 




1,041 








Total . 


5,609 


3,980 





Isaac Harvey Hull, Hanna. 
Lemuel Darrow, Laporte. 



Counties 



M.C. 
Murray, R. 



OtisL. 
Ballou, D. 



Lagrange. 
Steuben. . 



2,260 



361 



Total. 



361 



M. C. Murray, Stroh. 
Otis L. Ballou, Lagrange. 



Counties 


Eph. P. 
Dailey, R. 


Chester A. 
Lincoln, R. 


J. Lee 
Emery, D. 


Albert L. 
Lawrence, D. 


James D. 
Butt, D. 


Allen 


2,407 
601 


1,015 
935 


1,509 
915 


617 
852 


3,394 


Whitley 


734 






Total 


3,008 


1,950 


2,424 


1,469 


4,128 







Eph. P. Dailey, Fort Wayne. 
James D. Butt, Areola. 



Counties 


Harris E. 
Butler, R. 


Charlie W. 
Safford, R. 


Francis P. 
McNeff, R. 


LeeE. 
Shafer, D. 


George 
Burson, D. 


Fulton 


820 
607 


895 
267 


754 
515 


1,144 

697 


797 




905 






Tota 


1,427 


1,162 


1,269 


1,841 


1,702 







Harris E. Butler, Rochester. 
Lee E. Shafer, Grass Creek. 



Secretary of State 

STATE JOINT REPRESENTATIVES— Continued. 



25 



Counties 


Jacob D. 
Rich, R. 


EUis 
Jones, D. 










1,756 


836 








Total 


1,756 


836 







Ellis Jones, Remington. 
Jacob D. Rich, Brook. 



Counties 


Harry 

Kretschman, 

R. 


Wesley M. 
Girard, R. 


James W. 
Gardner, R. 


Samuel 
Young, R. 


Charles H. 
Dodson, D. 




1,418 
423 


170 
299 


596 
836 


309 
1,001 


837 


White., 


1,367 






Total 


1,841 


469 


1,432 


1,310 


2,204 





Harry Kretschman, Otterbein. 
Charles H. Dodson, Otterbein. 



Counties 


William R. 
Lytle, R. 


Charles V. 

McCloskey, 

D. 








Carroll 


1,823 


1,536 








Total 


1,823 


1,536 







William T. Lytle, Burlington. 

Charles V. McCloskey, Camden, R. R. 1. 





Earl B. 
Adams, R. 


Thurman A. 

Gottschalk, 

D. 


John H. 
Hedrick, D. 




801 


2,784 
1,595 


488 


Wells ; 


1,319 








Total 


801 


4,379 


1,807 







Earl B. Adams, Decatur. 
Thurman A. Gottschalk, Berne. 



Counties 


Wayne S. 
Tucker, R. 


Samuel J. 
Ferrell, R. 


Clifford 
Townsend, D. 


F B 
McDowell, D. 


G 


4,527 
407 


1,941 
1,076 


1,370 
1,208 


982 


Blackford 


489 


Total 


4,934 


3,017 


2,578 


1,471 







Wayne S. Tucker, Jonesboro. 
Clifford Townsend, Marion. 



26 



Year Book 



STATE JOINT REPRESENTATIVES— Continued. 



Counties 


Lonzo L. 
Shull, R. 


Linville 0. 
Teeter, R. 


Harry A. 
Binkley, R. 


Francis M. 

Henderson, 

R. 


Thomas E. 

Wooldridge, 

D. 




3,129 

589 


928 
284 


1,805 
910 


1,030 

241 




Tipton 








Total 


3,718 


1,212 


2,715 


1,271 









Lonzo L. Shull, Sharpsville. 
Thomas E. Wooldridge, Kokomo. 



Counties 



Tippecanoe 
Warren . . . 

Total . 



Harry G. 
Leslie, R. 



6,530 
1,284 



7,814 



Russell K. 
Bedgood, R. 



2,394 
897 



3,291 



Harry 
Eads, D. 



1,361 
260 



1,621 



Harry G. Leslie, Otterbein, R. 2. 
Harry Eads, Lafayette. 



Counties 


Elwood 
Morris, R. 


Jose N. 
Bridges, R. 


William H. 
Larrabee, D. 


John F. 
Wiggins, D. 


George H. 
Cooper, D. 




3,859 
1,096 


2,330 

554 


2,679 
1,962 


1,500 

822 


3,021 




1,073 






Total 


4,955 


2,884 


4,641 


2,322 


4,093 







Elwood Morris, Mt. Comfort, R. R. 
William H. Larrabee, New Palestine. 



Counties 


Oliver P. 
Lafuze, R. 


George M. 
Young, D. 


Colver H. 
Cruse, D. 




4,951 


800 
362 


683 




344 










Total 


4,951 


1,162 


1,027 





Oliver P. Lafuze, Liberty, R. 7. 
George M. Young, Richmond. 



Charles M. Trowbridge, 
Strode Hays, Newcastle. 



Counties 


Charles M. 

Trowbridge. 

R. 


Fred A. 
Bills, R. 


John A. D. 
Wagoner, D. 


Strode 
Hays, D. 




2,510 
2,207 


2,923 
1,202 


238 
1,183 


1 277 




521 






Total 


4,717 


4,125 


1,421 


1,798 







Secretary of State 

STATE JOINT REPRESENTATIVES— Continued. 



27 





Counties 


William R. 
Phillips, R. 


William F. 
Flack, D. 


Evan L. 
Patterson, D. 


Fayette 


2,355 


529 
1,673 


308 




1,397 










Total 


2,355 


2,202 


1,705 







Wiliam R. Phillips, Glenwood, R. 2. 
William F. Flack, Brookville. 



Counties 


Frank E. 
Cline, R. 


Thomas C. 
Whallon, R. 


Walter W. 
Aikens, D. 


Thomas A. 
Goodin, D. 


Harry W. 
Bassett D. 


Maiion 


18,774 
1,901 


8,520 
466 


2,989 
2,457 


1,242 
1,478 


5,182 
516 






Total 


20,675 


8,986 


5,446 


2,720 


5,698 







Frank E. Cline, Bargersville. 
Harry W. Bassett, Indianapolis. 



Counties 


John E. 
Harrison, R. 


Willis E. 
Gill, D. 




2,993 


4,019 














Total . 


2,993 


4,019 







John E. Harrison, Spencer. 
Willis E. Gill, Cloverdale. 



Counties 


William C. 
Pulse, R. 


William R. 
Pleak, R. 


Herrod 
Carr, R. 


John G. 
Klein, D. 




1,911 
953 


1,134 

446 


496 
801 






1,435 








Total 


2,864 


1, 580 


1,297 


1,435 







William C. Pulse, Greensburg. 
John G. Klein, North Vernon, R. 5. 



Counties 


Dewitt C. 
Wilber, R. 


Julius G. 
Schwing, D. 


George W, 
Elliott, D. 




1,399 

425 


2,255 

86 


1,231 


Ohio 


528 


Total 


1,824 


2,341 


1,759 







Dewitt C. Wilber, Aurora, R. 
Julius G. Schwing, Greendale. 



28 



Year Book 

STATE JOINT REPRESENTATIVES— Continued. 



Counties 


John W. 
Johnson, R. 


Madison F. 
Holman, D. 




1,907 
1,158 


1,822 




1,634 








Total. 


3,065 


3,456 





John W. Johnson, Patriot. 
Madison F. Holman, Osgood. 



Counties 


Charles E. 
Dean, R. 


Meyer 
Gladstein, R. 


George W. 
Miles, D. 


Clarence T. 
Custer, D. 




2,530 
521 


1,597 
700 


960 

778 


1,316 


Scott 


805 






Total. 


3,051 


2,297 


1,738 


2,121 







Charles E. Dean, Nabb, R. 1 
Clarence T. Custer, Dupont. 



Counties 


Chester 
Miller, R. 


Sherman 
Hall, D. 










238 


809 






Total 


238 


809 







Chester Miller, Seymour. 
Sherman Hall, Crothersville. 



Counties 


Lewis C. 
Carter, R. 


Will 

Nicholson, 

D. 


Walter R. 

Colglazier, 

D. 


Henry E. 
Smith, D. 




1,516 


1,858 
354 


1,245 
544 






199 








Total 


1,516 


2,212 


1,789 


199 







Lewis C. Carter, Salem. 
Will Nicholson, Salem, R. 3. 



Counties 


Straude E. 
Wiseman, R. 


Abraham 
S. Sieg, R. 


G. Remy 
Bierly, D. 




714 
1,369 


413 
1,332 


1,115 










Total 


2,083 


1,745 


1,115 







Straude E. Wiseman, Depauw. 
G. Remy Bierly, Elizabeth. 



Secretary of State 

STATE JOINT REPRESENTATIVES-Continued. 



29 



Counties 


Walter L. 
Jay, R. 


George L. 
Hoffman, D. 


Eldo W. 
Wood, D. 


James M. 
Songer, D. 




1,230 

585 


951 
2,645 


330 

754 


379 




1,824 






Total •. 


1,815 


3,596 


1,084 


2,203 





Walter L. Jay, Loogootee, R. 1. 
George L. Hoffman, Jasper, R. 3. 



Counties 


Albert J. 
Wedeking, R. 


Sid 

Cummings, 

R. 


T.J. 
Mullen, D. 


John P. 
Chrisney, D. 




281 
1,912 


1,125 

893 


1,129 
754 


1,022 




1,693 








Total 


2,193 


2,018 


1,883 


2,715 







Albert J. Wedeking, Dale. 
John P. Chrisney, Chrisney. 



Counties 


W.B. 

Anderson, 
R. 


Edgar 

Livingston, 

D. 








Pike 


1,489 


1,085 








Total 


1,489 


1,085 







W. B. Anderson, Oakland City. 
Edgar Livingston, Bruceville. 



Counties 


Thomas B. 
Brown, R. 


Brainerd 

Oaks Hanby, 

R. 


Fritz 
Long, R. 


Carl A. 

Weilbrenner, 

R. 


Frederick H. 
Martin, D. 




223 

2,877 
715 


339 

891 
408 


302 

2,589 
426 


639 

2,097 

584 


2,364 




3,943 




2,158 






Total. 


3,815 


1,638 


3,317 


3,320 


8,465 







Thomas B. Brown, Mt. Vernon. 
Frederick H. Martin, Newburgh, R. 



30 



Year Book 



JUDGES OF THE CIRCUIT COURT. 
Second Circuit. 



Counties 


Roscoe 
Kiper, R. 


Union W. 

Youngblood, 

R. 


Caleb J. 
Lindsey, D. 


Zachariah 
Turpen, D. 


OraA. 
Davis, D. 


Warrick 


1,143 


1,273 


1,439 


859 


903 







Union W. Youngblood, Boonville. 
Caleb J. Lindsey, Boonville. 



Ninth Circuit. 



County 


John W. 
Donaker, R. 


Cassius B. 
Cooper, D. 


Carl J. 
Kollmeyer, 




3,372 


1,713 


2,213 







John W. Donaker, Columbus. 
Carl J. Kollmeyer, Columbus. 



Sixteenth Circuit. 



County. 


Elmer 
Bassett, R. 


Harry C. 
Morrison, D. 


Shelby 


2,616 


4,650 





Elmer Bassett Shelbyville. 
Harry C. Morrison, Shelbyville. 



Thirty-Second Circuit. 



John C Richter, Laporte. 

James F. Gallaher, Michigan City. 



Thirty-Fourth Circuit. 



County 


John C. 
Richter, R. 


James F. 
Gallaher, D. 




4,081 


3,534 







Counties 


James S. 
Drake, R. 


Elkhart 


4,676 




2,551 






Total 


7,227 







James S. Drake, Goshen. 



Secretary of State 

Thirty-Fifth Circuit. 



31 



Counties 


James E. 
Pomeroy, R. 


William P. 
Endicott, R. 


Walter D. 
Stump, D. 


Dekalb 


1,615 
1,686 


1,627 
1,768 


2,906 








Total! 


3,301 


3,395 


2 906 







William P. Endicott, Butler. 
Walter D. Stump, Auburn. 



Thirty-Seventh Circuit. 



Counties 


Cecil C. 
Tague, R. 


Albert J. 
Peine, D. 


I.N. 
McCarty, D. 


Marsh R. 
Alexander, D. 


George L. 
Gray, D. 






1,847 

287 


836 
191 


281 
32 


648 






327 










Total. . 




2,134 


1,027 


313 


975 









Cecil C. Tague, Brookville. 
Albert J. Peine, Brookville. 



Forty-Sixth Circuit. 



County 


Clarence W. 
Dearth, R. 


Ozro N. 
Cranor, R. 


Everett 
Warner, R. 


William A. 

Thompson, 

R. 


Adolph C. 

Silverburg, 

D. 




4,292 


331 


2,869 


1,422 


1,660 







Clarence W. Dearth, Muncie. 
Adolph C. Silverburg, Muncie. 



Forty-Seventh Circuit. 



County 


Everett A. 

Davisson, 

R. 


W. Bert 

Conley, 

R. 


Edward B. 

James, 

R. 


Edward E. 

Neel, 

R. 


Hezzie B. 

Pike, 

R. 


Edbert P. 
Zell, 
R. 


Ernest M. 

Causey, 

D. 


William C. 

Wait 

D. 


Vermillion 


872 


782 


666 


87 


676 


261 


722 


1,373 



Everett A. Davisson, Clinton. 
William C. Wait, Newport. 



Forty-Eighth Circuit. 



County 



Grant . 



J. Frank 
Charles, R. 



6,775 



Wilber E. 
Williams, D. 



2,370 



J. Frank Charles, Marion. 
Wilber E. Williams, Marion. 



32 



Year Book 



JUDGES OF THE CIRCUIT COURT— Continued. 
Forty-Ninth Circuit. 



Counties 


Frank E. 
Gilkison, R. 


Milton S. 
Hastings, R. 


Alvin 
Padgett, D. 




1,539 
1,034 


2,624 
674 


2,565 
1,443 






Total 


2,573 


3,298 


4 008 







Milton S. Hastings, Washington. 
Alvin Padgett, Washington. 

Fifty-Eighth Circuit. 



County 



Roscoe D. 
Wheat, R. 



Emerson E. 
McGriff, D. 



Frank 
Gillespie, D. 



Jay. 



,212 



,566 



1,757 



Roscoe D. Wheat, Robinwood, R. 12. 
Frank Gillespie, Portland, R. 2. 



Sixty-Second Circuit. 



County 


William C. 
Overton, R. 


Albert B. 

Kirkpatrick, 

R. 


Fred J. 
Byers, R. 


Clarence H. 
Wills, R. 


John 
Marshall, D. 




2,669 


2,211 


1,680 


1,553 









William C. Overton, Kokomo. 
John Marshall, Kokomo. 



Sixty-Eighth Circuit. 



County 


Howard L. 
Hancock, R. 


Henry 
Daniels, R. 


Forrest W. 
Ingram, D. 


C.Ray 
Collings, D. 


Roy 
Baker, D. 




2,529 


1,963 


176 


394 


942 







Howard L. Hancock, Rockville. 
Roy Baker, Rockville. 



SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES. 



County 


Robert J. 
Tracewell, R. 


Harlan B. 
McCoy, R. 


Lane B. 
Osborn, D. 




5,328 


4,537 








Robert J. Tracewell, Evansville. 
Lane B. Osborn, Evansville. 


County 


William N. 
Ballou, R. 


Charles J. 
Ryan, D. 


Allen 


3,718 


5,338 







William N. Ballou, Fort Wayne. 
Charles J. Ryan,,Fort Wayne. 



Secretary of State 

SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES— Continued. 



33 



County 


James S. 
Dodge, R. 


Forrest E. 
Hughes, R. 


William B. 
Hile, R. 


Clarendon 

Clyde Ray- 

mer, D. 


OrrinH. 
Markel, D. 


Elkhart 


1,475 


918 


2,925 


1,245 


1,026 





William B. Hile, Elkhart. 
Clarendon C. Raymer, Elkhart. 



County 


Robert F. 
Murray, R. 


William C. 
Coryell, D. 




5,987 
6,885 


2,366 
1,317 








Total. 


12,872 


3,683 







Robert F. Murray, Muncie. 
William C. Coryell, Marion. 



County 


Virgil S. 
Reiter, R. 


LeGrand T. 
Meyer, D. 




13,111 


843 







Virgil S. Reiter, Hammond. 
LeGrand T. Meyer, Hammond. 



County 



Maurice 
Edward 
Crites, R. 



Lake, Room 2 . 



11,943 



Maurice Edward Crites, East Chicago. 



County 


Charles E. 

Greenwald, 

R. 


Emmet N. 
White, D. 




13,117 


789 









Charles E. Greenwald, Gary. 
Emmet N. White, Gary. 



County 


James M. 
Leathers, R. 


William W. 
Thornton.R. 


Salem D. 
Clark, D. 


Clifton R. 
Cameron, D. 




17,076 


17,043 


7,233 


4,625 







James M. Leathers, Indianapolis. 
Salem D. Clark, Indianapolis. 



County 


Linn D. 
Hay, R. 


Frank M. 
Hay, R. 


T. Ernest 
Maholm, R. 


George N. 
Burkhart, D. 


Smiley N. 
Chambers, D. 




18,862 


4,896 


8,325 


4,403 


7,253 











Linn D. Hay, Indianapolis. 
Smiley N. Chambers, Indianapoli 
3—22978 



34 



Year Book 

SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES-Continued. 



County 


John L. 
Benedict, R. 


J. Fred 
Masters, R. 


Sidney S. 
Miller, R. 


Edward W. 
Little, D. 




6,137 


13,174 


14,456 


9,746 







Sidney S. Miller, Indianapolis. 
Edward W. Little, Indianapoli 



County 


Clinton H. 
Givan, R. 


James E. 

McDonald, 

R. 


John W. 
Bowl us, R. 


William 0. 
Dunlavy, R. 


Clarence 
Ellsworth 
Weir, D. 




9,587 


8,726 


6,326 


7,411 


9,401 







Clinton H. Givan, Indianapolis. 
Clarence Ellsworth Weir, Indianapolis 



County 


Theophilus 
J. Moll, R. 


•Reuben N. 
Miller, R. 


Richard L. 
Ewbank, R. 


Gideon W. 
Blain, D. 


Joseph R. 
Williams, D. 


Marion, Room 5 


13,701 


5,471 


13,492 


5,833 


5,346 



Theophilus J. Moll, Indianapolis. 
Gideon W. Blain, Indianapolis. 



County 


Lewis E. 

Kimberlin, 

R. 


Francis A. 
Walker, R. 


Willis S. 
Ellis D. 


Jesse C. 
Shuman D. 




3,023 


3,887 


3,512 


2,290 







Francis A. Walker, Anderson. 
Willis S. Ellis, Anderson. 





County 


Harry L. 

Crumpacker, 

R. 


Warren C. 

Ransburg, 

D. 




4,507 
4,112 


2,907 




292 








Total 


8,916 


3,199 







Harry L. Crumpacker, Michigan City. 
Warren C. Ransburg, Laporte. 



County 


Alfred E. 
Martin, R. 


J.Fred 
Bingham, D. 




4,241 


2,579 







Alfred E. Martin, SouthlBend. 
J. Fred^Bingham, Mishawaka. 



Secretary of State 

SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES— Continued. 



35 





County 






Fred C. 
Klein, R. 


Antony A. 
Wolfe, D. 




I 


lifl 




4,273 


2,364 








Fred C. Klein, South Bend. 
■ Antony A. Wolfe, South Bend. 


County 


Henry H. 
Vinton, R. 


Horace H. 
Lewis, R. 




7,087 


1,898 




Henry H. Vinton, Lafayette. 










, 


County 


Chester Y. 
Kelly, R. 


Sam 
Beecher, R. 


Henry W. , 
Moore, D. 


John E. 
Cox, D. 




6,273 


5,070 


4,675 


6,315 







Chester Y. Kelly, Terre Haute. 
John E. Cox, Terre Haute. 



Probate Court Judge. 



County 


Mahlon E. 

Bash, 

R. 


Harold K. 

Bachelder, 

D. . 




20,560 


9,170 







Mahlon E. Bash, Indianapolis. 
Harold K. Bachelder, Indianapolis. 



Criminal Court Judges. 



County 


Charles T. 
Kaelin, R. 


James A. 
Collins, R. 


James D. 
Ermston, D. 




6,237 


' 27,035 


9,192 







James A. Collins, Indianapolis. 
James D. Ermston, Indianapolis. 



Juvenile Court Judge. 



County 


Joseph A. 
Minturn, R. 


Frank J. 
Lahr, R. 


Robert N. 
Fulton, R. 


Jacob L. 

Steimnetz, 

D. 


Jesse 
Sanford, D. 




6,669 


17,891 


9,387 


5,864 


5,239 







Frank J. Lahr, Indianapolis. 
Jacob L. Steimnetz, Indianapolis 



36 



Year Book 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS 
First Circuit 



Henry A. Bippus, Newburg. 
George A. Lutz, Boonville. 



Third Circuit 



Phillip S. Seacat, Depauw. 
Sam P. Vogt, Corydon, R. 1. 



County 


Charles F. 

Werner, 
Republican 


Thomas W. 

Lindsey, 

Republican 


Henry T. 
Hardin, 
Democrat 




6,197 


3,709 








Charles F. Werner, Evansville. 
Henry T. Hardin, Evansville. 

Second Circuit 


County 


Henry A. 

Bippus, 

Republican 


John W. 

Roberts, 

Republican 


George A. 

Lutz, 
Democrat 




1,314 


988 


1,961 





Counties 


Phillip S. 

Seacat, 
Republican 


Sam P. 

Vogt, 

Democrat 




982 


1,070 












Total 


982 


1,070 







Fourth Circuit 



■# County 


James L. 
Bottorff 
Democrat 


Clark. 








James L. Bottorff, Jeffersonville. 

Fifth Circuit 


Counties 


George B. 
Hall, Jr., 
Republican 


Harvey J. 
Zearing, 
Democrat 










1,134 


1,659 






Total. 


1,134 


1,659 







George B. Hall, Jr., Vevay. 
Harvey J. Zearing, Madison. 



Secretary of State 



37 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS— Continued 
Sixth Circuit 



Counties 


Blucher M. 

Owens, 
Republican 


Benjamin F. 

Atwell, 
Republican 


William M. 
Turner, 
Democrat 


Ripley 


1,108 

1,073 

846 


895 

1,130 

336 


1,879 




1,354 
1 206 


Scott 






Total 


3,027 


2,361 


4,439 







Blucher M. Owens, Scottsburg. 
William M. Turner, Osgood. 

Seventh Circuit 



Counties 


Crawford A. 

Peters, 
Republican 


Thomas A. 
Cooper, 
Democrat 




1,482 
439 


2,560 
530 


Ohio 








Total 


1,921 


3,090 







Crawford A. Peters, Aurora. 
Thomas A. Cooper, Aurora. 

Eighth Circuit 





Counties 


Hugh E. 
Vandiver, 
Republican 


John P. 
Wright, 
Democrat 




224 
1,841 


934 




3,486 








Total 


2,065 


4,420 







Hugh E. Vandiver, Franklin. 
John P. Wright, Franklin. 



Ninth Circuit 



County 


Archibald T. 

Conner, 
Republican 


John E. 
Summa 




2,971 


3,022 







Archibald T. Conner, Columbus. 
John E. Summa, Columbus. 



Tenth District 



Counties 


Glen B. 
Woodward, 
Republican 


Simpson L. 
Robertson, 
Republican 


Frank J. 

Dunn, 

Democrat 




2,291 
758 


1,735 
1,032 


1,802 










Total 


3,049 


2,767 


1,802 







Glen B. Woodward. Bloomington. 
Frank J. Dunn, Bloomington. 



38 



Year Book 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS— Continued 
Eleventh Circuit 



County 


James S. 

Kilroy, 

Democrat 




2,648 






James S. Kilroy, Poseyville. 


Twelfth Circuit 








County 


John Rabb 

Emison, 
Republican 


Merle C. 
Loucks, 
Republican 


Floyd L. 
Young, 
Democrat 


Horace A. 
Foncannon, 
Democrat 




3,217 


983 


3,918 


1,514 







John Rabb Emison, Vincennes. 
Floyd L. Young, Vincennes. 



Thirteenth Circuit 



County 


Henry A. 
McShanog, 
Republican 


Roy V. 

Tozer, 

Democrat 


Clay 


2,908 


3,572 






Henry A. McShanog, Knightsville. 
Roy V. Tozer, Brazil. 

Fourteenth Circuit 


County 


Burl 0. 

Buckley, 

Republican 


Norval K. 

Harris, 
Democrat 




1.576 


4,092 







Burl 0. Buckley, Shelburn. 
Norval K. Harris, Sullivan. 



Fifteenth Circuit 



County 


Omar 
O'Harrow, 
Republican 


Oral W. 

Smith, 

Republican 


Fred W. 

Steiger, 

Democrat 




1,705 


1,984 








Oral W. Smith, Martinsville. 
Fred W. Steiger, Centerton. 

Sixteenth Circuit 


County 


Ara E. 

Lisher, 

Republican 


George S. 
Billman, 
Democrat 


Arthur L. 
McLane, 
Democrat 


Shelby 


2,501 


2,232 


2,762 







Ara E. Lisher, Shelbyville. 
Arthur L. McLane, Shelbyville. 



Secretary of State 



39 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS— Continued 
Seventeenth Circuit 



County 


Paul A. 

Beckett, 

Republican 


Frank T. 

Strayer, 

Republican 


James F. 

Pace, 
Democrat 


A. 0. 

Vioni, 
Democrat 




3,361 


3,919 


1,195 


283 







Frank T. Strayer, Richmond. 
James F. Pace, Richmond. 



Eighteenth Circuit 



County 


George F. 
Dickman, 
Republican 


Waldo C. 

Ging, 
Democrat 


George T. 
Tindall, 
Democrat 






2,473 


1,402 









George F. Dickmann, Greenfield. 
Waldo C. Ging, Greenfield. 



Nineteenth Circuit 



County 


William JP. 

Evans, 
Republican 


John D. 

Blue, 
Democrat 


Richard M. 
Coleman, 
Democrat 




25,295 


4,145 


8,257 









William P. Evans, Indianapolis. 
Richard M. Coleman, Indianapolis. 



Twentieth Circuit 



County 


Guy M. 

Voris, 

Republican 


Ruel H. 

Cain, 
Democrat 


Carl W. 
Lambert, 
Democrat 






1,912 


1,749 









Guy M. Voris, Lebanon. 
Ruel H. Cain, Lebanon. 



Twenty-First Circuit 



Counties 


Wilbur G. 

Nolin, 
Republican 




2,155 




1,799 








Total 


3,954 







Wilbur G. Nolin, Fowler. 



40 



Year Book 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS-Continued 
Twenty-Second Circuit 



County 


Harry D. 

Michael, 

Republican 


Thomas E. 
O'Connor, 
Democrat 




3,688 


2,275 





Harry D. Michael, Crawfordsville. 
Thomas E. O'Connor, New Market. 



Twenty-Third Circuit 



County 


Mark L. 
Thompson, 
Republican 


Edward J. 
O'Connor, 
Republican 


Lovell J. 

Ledman, 

Republican 


Fred W. 

Saers, 
Republican 


William A. 

Dresser, 
Republican 


Francis J. 
Murphy, 
Democrat 




4,054 


2,769 


833 


196 


1,427 


1,432 







Mark L. Thompson, Lafayette. 
Francis J. Murphy, Lafayette. 



Twenty-Fourth Circuit 



County 




George W. 
Osborn, 
Democrat 



Hamilton. 



Ralph H. Waltz, Arcadia. 
George W. Osborn, Sheridan. 



Twenty-Fifth Circuit 



County 


Ernest M. 

Dunn, 
Republican 


Ira 

Vernon, 

Republican 


Bert E. 
Woodbury, 
Democrat 




3,503 


1,981 








Ernest M. Dunn, Union City. 
Bert E. Woodbury, Union City. 


Twenty-Sixth Circuit 








County 


Wade L. 

Manley, 

Republican 


Adam C. 
Butcher, 
Democrat 


Frank S. 

Annantrout, 

Democrat 


Homer H. 
Knodle, 
Democrat 


E. Burt 
Lenhart, 
Democrat 




791 


1,160 


863 


542 


1,241 







Wade L. Manley, Geneva. 
E. Burt Lenhart, Decatur. 



Twenty-Seventh Circuit 



County 



Howard E. 
Plummer, 
Republican 



Howard E. Plummer, Wabash. 



Secretary of State 



41 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS-Continued 
Twenty-Eighth Circuit 





Counties 


Victor H. 
Simmons, 
Republican 


William A. 

Burns, 
Democrat 


Blackford 


1,196 


1,603 


Wells - - 












Total 


1,196 


1,603 







Victor H. Simmons, Hartford City. 
Wiliam A. Burns, Hartford City. 



Twenty-Ninth Circuit 



Counties 



Don 
Douglass, 
Republican 



Robert J. 
Arthur, 
Democrat 



Don Douglass, Logansport. 
Robert J. Arthur, Logansport. 



Thirtieth Circuit 



Counties 


James C. 

Murphy ,] 

Republican 








1,580 




- 




Total 


1,580 







James C. Murphy, Morocco. 



Thirty-First Circuit 



County 



Dwight 

Monroe 

Kinder, 

Republican 



Lake. 



13,631 



Dwight Monroe Kinder, Gary. 



Thirty-Second Circuit 



County 


, John B. 
Dilworth, 
Republican 


Joseph 

Dudeck, 

Republican 


Walter C. 
Williams, 
Republican 


Leonard R. 
Henoch, 
Democrat 


Paul A. 
Krueger, 
Democrat 




2,913 


407 


1,616 


1,786 


2,259 







John B. Dilworth, Laporte. 
Paul A. Krueger, Michigan City. 



42 



Year Book 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS— Continued 
Thirty-Third Circuit 





Counties 


George 0. 
Compton, 
Republican 


Robin Adair 

Strong, 

Democrat 


Noble 


2,531 
1,421 


1,528 
2,184 


Whitley 






Total 


3,952 


3,712 





George 0. Compton, Columbia City. 
Robin Adair Strong, Columbia City. 



Thirty-Fourth Circuit 



Counties 


Glen R. 

Sawyer, 

Republican 


Jonathan S. 

Yoder, 
Republican 


Fred E. 

Cluen, 

Democrat 


Roy 
Sargent, 
Democrat 


Elkhart 


3,288 
1,356 


1,915 
1,130 


1,026 
115 


1,245 




227 






Total 


4,644 


3,045 


1,141 


1,472 



Glen R. Sawyer, Elkhart. 
Roy Sargent, Elkhart. 



Thirty-Fifth Circuit 



Counties 



John H. S. 

Walker, 
Republican 



Charles S. 

Smith, 
Republican 



Henry C. 

Springer, 

Republican 



Dekalb 

Steuben 

Total 



390 



1,093 
1,218 



1,529 
1,037 



1,428 



2,311 



2,566 



Henry C. Springer, Garrett. 


Thirty-Sixth Circuit 






County 


Alfred A. 
Fletcher, 
Republican 


Tipton 








Alfred A. Fletcher, Tipton. 


Thirty-Seventh Circuit 






Counties 


Elmer F. 

Bossert, 

Republican 


Clifford W. 
Hoffman, 
Democrat 























Total 













Elmer F. Bossert, Brookville. 
Clifford W. Hoffman, Laurel. 



Secretary of State 



43 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS— Continued 
Thirty-Eighth Circuit 



County 


Louis F. 

Crosby, 

Republican 


Samuel D, 
Jackson, 
Democrat 


Allen 


3,297 


5,479 







Louis F. Crosby, Ft. Wayne. 
Samuel D. Jackson, Ft. Wayne. 



Thirty-Ninth Circuit 



Counties 


Glenn R. 

Slenker, 

Republican 


John A. 
Rothrock, 
Democrat 


Carroll 


1,773 
2,276 


1,511 


White 


1,481 








Total 


4,049 


2,992 









Glenn R. Slenker,' Monticello. 
John A. Rothrock, Monticello. 



Fortieth Circuit 



Counties 


Harold 

Kelley, 

Republican 


Simpson B. 

Lowe, 
Republican 


Fernando W. 

Wesner, 

Democrat 


Merlin C. 

Roach, 
Democrat 




1,770 
572 


2,318 
1,003 


349 
1,826 


1,143 




1,636 






Total 


2,342 


3,321 


2,175 


2,779 







Simpson B. Lowe, Bedford. 
Merlin C. Roach, Bedford. 



Forty-First Circuit 



Counties 


Alvin F. 

Marsh, 
Republican 


Charles G. 

Irvine, 
Democrat 


Fulton. 


1,745 
2,027 


1,657 




1,969 








Total 


3,772 


3,626 






Alvin F. Marsh, Plymouth. 
Charles G. Irvine, Akron. 

Forty-Second Circuit 


Counties 


Henry L. 

Heil, 
Republican 


Samuel R. 
Lambdin, 
Democrat 


Thomas P. 
Masterson, 
Democrat 






696 
786 


621 




1,369 


2,447 






Total 


1,369 


1,482 


3,068 







Henry L. Heil, r Orleans. 
Thomas P. Masterson, Salem. 



44 



Year Book 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS-Continued 
Forty-Third Circuit 



County 


Noble J. 

Johnson, 

Republican 


Duff 
Caldwell, 
Democrat 




8,057 


7,293 





Noble J. Johnson, Terre Haute. 
Duff Caldwell, Terre Haute. 



Forty-Fourth Circuit 



Counties 


Jay M. 

Nye, 

Republican 


George 

Dellinger, Jr. 

Democrat 






1,347 
1,635 


1,433 




1,017 








Total 


2,982 


2,450 





Jay M. Nye, Winamac. 
George Dellinger, Jr., Winamac. 



Forty-Fifth Circuit 



Counties 



Dan C. 
Flanagan, 
Republican 



Ernest W. 
Thompson, 
Republican 



Paul E. 
Laymon, 
Democrat 



Clinton. 



1,432 



1,876 



Ernest W. Thompson, Frankfort, R. 2. 
Paul E. L#ymon, Frankfort. 



Forty-Sixth Circuit 



County 


Van L. 

Ogle, 

Republican 


Rollin W. 
Lennington, 
Republican 


Cary A. 

Taughinbaugh, 

Democrat 


Obed 
Kilgore, 
Democrat 




4,176 


3,775 


502 


1,295 







Van L. Ogle, Muncie. 
Obed Kilgore, Muncie. 



Forty-Seventh Circuit 



Counties 


Robert E. 

Guinn, 
Republican 


James H. 

Storm, 
Democrat 


W His A. 
Satterlee, 
Democrat 






414 


1,472 









Robert E. Guinn, Clinton. 
Willis A. Satterlee, Clinton. 



Secretary of State 



45 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS— Continued 
Forty-Eighth Circuit 



Counties 


Elzona H. 

Graves, 
Republican 


Miles C. 

Coble, 
Republican 


A. Jay 

Keever, 

Republican 


J. Walter 
McClellan, 
Democrat 


William H. 
Winsett, 
Democrat 




2,175 


2,189 


2,952 


1,786 


736 







A. Jay Keever, Jonesboro. 

J. Walter McClellan, Matthews. 



Forty-Ninth Circuit 



Counties 


J. Earle 
Thompson, 
Republican 


John H. 
Spencer, 
Democrat 




3,179 
1,227 


2,422 




1,210 








Total 


4,406 


3,632 









J. Earle Thompson, Washington. 
John H. Spencer, Washington. 



Fiftieth Circuit 



County 


Arthur A. 
Beckman, 
Republican 


Carter 
Vermillion, 
Republican 


Emmett 
Costello, 
Democrat 


Charles E. 

Smith, 
Democrat 




4,038 


2,761 


1,715 


3,861 







Arthur A. Beckman, Anderson. 
Charles E. Smith, Anderson. 



Fifty-First Circuit 





County 


Hugh P. 
Lawrence, 
Republican 


Adelbert W. 

Matt, 

Democrat 


Rodney H. 

Bayless, 
Democrat 




1,774 


2,390 











Hugh P. Lawrence, Peru. 
Rodney H. Bayless, Peru. 



Fifty-Second Circuit 



County 


Charles R. 
McBride, 
Republican 


Charles R. 
Turner, 
Democrat 


William E. 
Coolman, 
Democrat 


Harry W. 
Carpenter, 
Democrat 


Floyd 


2,400 


2,704 


409 


1,532 







Charles R. McBride, New Albany. 
Charles R. Turner, New Albany. 



46 



Year Book 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS— Continued 
Fifty-Third Circuit 



County 


George R. 

Jeffrey, 
Republican 


William J. 

Kelly, 
Democrat 


Henry 













George R. Jeffrey, Newcastle. 
William J. Kelly, Middletown. 



Fifty-Fourth Circuit 



County 


William Gray 

Loehr, 

Republican 


Morrison A. 
Rockhill, 
Republican 


George L. 
Xanders, 
Democrat 




2,830 


3,069 









Morrison A. Rockhill, Mentone. 
George L. Xanders, Syracuse. 


Fifty-Fifth Circuit 



County 


John T. 

Hume, 

Republican 


William J. 

Goff, 
Republican 


Archie J. 

Kahl, 
Democrat 




3,009 


1,439 









John T. Hume, Danville. 
Archie J. Kahl, Danville. 



Fifty-Sixth Circuit 



County 



Howard W. 

Kacy, 
Republican 



Knowlton H. 

Kelsey, 
Republican 



Burdge H. 

Hurd, 
Democrat 



Huntington . 



1,682 



2,263 



3,235 



Knowlton H. Kelsey, Huntington. 
Burdge H. Hurd, Huntington. 



Fifty-Seventh Circuit 



Counties 


Stanley M. 

Krieg, 
Democrat 


Carl M. 

Gray, 
Democrat 






1,941 

464 


3,156 


Pike 


1,085 








Total 


2,405 


4,241 







Carl M. Gray, Petersburg. 



Fifty-Eighth Circuit 



County 



Jay. 



Austin H. 
Williamson, 
Republican 



2,299 



Guy 

Bryan, 

Democrat 



2,404 



Austin H. Williamson, Redkey. 
Guy Bryan, Portland. 



Secretary of State 



47 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS— Continued 
Sixtieth Circuit 



CotlNTT 


Frank E. 
Coughlin, 
Republican 


Floyd 0. 

Jellison, 

Republican 


M. Edward 

Doran, 
Democrat 




3,215 


3,027 


2 608 






Frank E. Coughlin, South Bend. 
M. Edward Doran, South Bend. 

Sixty-First Circuit 


County 


Harvey 
McBroom, 
Republican 


John P. 

Brissey, 

Republican 




1,431 


1,799 






John P. Brissey, Veedersburg. 

Sixty-Second Circuit 


County 


Forest A. 

Harness, 

Republican 


George W. 

Hobson, 
Republican 




5,166 


2,574 




Forest A. Harness, Kokomo. 

Sixty-Third Circuit 


County 


Alfred M. 

Beasley, 

Republican 


Al D. 

English, 
Republican 


Cary L. 

Harrel, 

Republican 


George G. 

Humphreys, 

Democrat 




2,123 


1,045 


1,476 









Alfred M. Beasley, Linton. 
George G. Humphreys, Linton. 



Sixty-Fourth Circuit 



County 


Frank 

Stoessel, 

Republican 


Fay S. 
Hamilton, 
Democrat 


Glenn H. 

Lyon, 
Democrat 




2,979 


2,090 


2,568 







Frank Stoessel, Greencastle. 
Glenn H. Lyon, Greencastle. 



Sixty-Fifth Circuit 



County 



John F. 

Joyce, 

Republican 



Albert C. 

Stevens, 

Republican 



Gates 
Ketchum, 
Democrat 



1,711 



1,705 



John F. Joyce, Rushville. 
Gates Ketchum, Rushville. 



48 



Year Book 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS— Continued 
Sixty-Sixth Circuit 



County 


James J. 
Robinson, 
Republican 


George L. 
Bridenhager, 
Democrat 


Clarence C. 
Rumer, 
Democrat 


James P. 
Duncan, 
Democrat 




3,082 


1,582 


693 


855 







James J. Robinson, Princeton. 
George L. Bridenhager, Owensville. 



Sixty-Seventh Circuit 



County 


Joseph S. 
Bartholomew 
Republican 


Percy J. 

Bailey, 

Republican 


Parmenieus 

Lyon, 
Republican 


Field Ray 

Marine, 
Republican 




1,482 


1,398 


212 


2,138 





Field Ray Marine, Valparaiso. 



Sixty-Eighth Circuit 



County 


Earl M. 

Dowd, 

Republican 


Hugh H. 

Banta, 

Democrat 


Parke • 


3,287 


1,174 







Earl M. Dowd, Rockville. 
Hugh H. Banta, Rockville. 



Sixty-Ninth Circuit 



County 



John W. 
Hoi comb, 
Republican 



Decatur. 



John W. Holcomb, Greensburg. 



Seventieth Circuit 



County 


Hooker 

Wagner, 

Republican 


Edmund S. 

Lincoln, 
Republican 


Daniel C. 

Goble, 
Democrat 




1,260 
334 


1,624 
1,050 


1,625 




855 






Total 


1,594 


2,674 


2,480 







Edmund S. Lincoln, Cannelton. 
Daniel C. Goble, Cannelton. 

Seventy-Third Circuit 



County 


William E. 

Sparks, 
Republican 


Grover I. 
Fenwick, 
Democrat 




2,642 


780 







William E. Sparks, Connersville. 
Grover I. Fenwick, Connersville. 



Secretary op State 



49 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE 

For United States Senator, State Officers, Congressmen, Judges, Prosecuting Attorneys, and Members of 
the General Assembly, at the general election held on November 7, 1922. 





United States Senator 


Secretary op State 


Counties 


-s 3 > a 
53 




Ml 




Q 


grg'g 

gCQCQ 

25 




2,836 
13,824 
5,552 
2,930 
2,909 

5,821 
887 
4,384 
7,318 
5,081 

4,784 
6,430 
2,246 
6,014 
4,176 

4,758 
5,016 
10,555 
2,532 
9,122 

4,238 
5,234 
4,598 
3,307 
3,873 

6,445 
9,019 
6,457 
6,201 
3,545 

4,215 
5,391 
6,255 
6,689 
6,593 

3,931 
3,405 
5,773 
5,138 
3,148 

4,448 
7,950 
6,766 
3,362 
14,584 

8,236 
5,353 
13,060 

42,725 
5,227 

2,683 
5,445 
4,805 
7,271 
4,639 


4,521 
16,981 
6,207 
2,724 
3,035 

6,494 
1,496 
4,260 
9,767 
6,698 

6,404 
7,135 
2,777 
6,539 
5,277 

4,496 
5,911 
8,023 
5,031 
8,222 

3,480 
7,550 
4,759 
4,340 
4,021 

7,499 
8,850 
7,484 
4,537 
4,927 

4,590 
4,446 
6,063 
5,694 
7,638 

6,175 
2,610 
5,597 
4,707 
3,290 

5,744 
9,665 
5,280 

1,822 
10,248 

7,094 
5,345 
14,299 
49,067 
5,212 

2,866 
7,892 
5,487 
7,054 
4,818 


14 

266 

76 

13 

121 

37 

23 

29 
188 

74 

327 
71 
18 

124 
85 

42 
98' 

43 

75 
275 

56 
126 
226 

20 
119 

316 

496 

855 

46 

42 

35 

42 

227 

1,670 

126 

78 
30 
66 
57 
50 

89 
685 
104 

22 
395 

306 

75 

506 

1,132 

97 

30 

242 

39 

56 

75 


2,666 
13,705 
5-, 752 
3,139 
2,860 

5,964 
865 
4,477 
7,925 
5,176 

4,831 
6,631 
2,200 
6,146 
4,283 

4,908 

4,384 
11,658 
2,531 
9,398 

4,293 
5,346 
4,676 
3,323 
3,919 

6,597 
8,837 
6,680 
6,267 
3,612 

4,082 
5,637 
6,984 
6,882 
6,839 

3,972 
3,509 
5,619 
5,233 
3,212 

4,535 

8,007 
6,734 
3,227 
15,383 

8,289 
5,569 
13,430 
47,668 
5,141 

2,657 
5,773 
5,049 
7,494 
4,716 


4,279 
16,748 
5,736 
2,322 
2,968 

6,384 
1,392 
4,081 
8,680 
6,160 

5,864 
6,931 
2,668 
6,087 
4,823 

4,144 
6,398 
6,278 
4,747 
7,212 

3,192 
6,941 
4,625 
4,062 
3,850 

6,987 
8,211 
6,734 
4,097 
4,584 

4,442 
4,202 
5,294 
4,795 
7,090 

5,753 

2,332 
5,433 
4,397 
3,033 

5,283 
8,991 
4,984 
1,771 
9,370 

6,660 

4,827 
13,800 
44,295 

5,039 

2,775 
7,231 
4,867 
6,776 
4,500 


18 


Allen 


288 




72 




19 




124 




33 




21 


Carroll 


27 




196 


Clark 


71 


Clay 


319 




64 




15 




123 




85 




47 


Dekalb 


104 




41 




70 


Elkhart 


317 




53 


Floyd 


,122 




226 




22 


Fulton 


113 




329 




525 




849 




47 




42 




33 




42 




214 




1,753 




134 




77 




31 




74 




57 




53 




87 




665 




97 




21 




390 




302 




76 




520 




1,133 




91 




27 




213 




42 




56 




76 



4—22978 



50 



Year Book 

ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 



Counties 



Newton 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 

Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski 

Putnam .!.... 

Randolph 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

Steuben 

St. Joseph 

Sullivan 

Switzerland . . . 
Tippecanoe. . . 
Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh. . 
Vermillion 
Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington. . . 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley 

Total 



United States Senator 






2,181 
5,195 
1,052 
4,053 
2,793 

4,488 
3,439 
3,515 
3,961 
3,917 

2,717 
4,590 
6,643 
4,729 
5,310 

1,581 
5,421 
4,539 
2,346 
3,830 

12,657 
4,326 
2,478 
9,321 
3,847 

1,829 
14,301 

3,557 
12,321 

6,448 
2,488 
4,192 
3,320 

8,304 
3,515 

4,162 
4,028 



524,558 



2 si 



!£q 



1,947 
4,477 
1,215 
3,722 
3,525 

4,358 
4,091 
3,798 
2,489 
4,966 

2,879 
5,753 
3,916 

4,822 
4,493 

2,093 
7,025 
4,402 
2,167 
1,816 

12,990 
6,701 
2,755 
8,282 
4,077 

1,452 
17,065 

4,165 
17,289 

5,627 
1,414 
4,857 
4,358 

8,008 
4,652 
4,122 
4,253 



558,169 



I Si 

lad 



43 
69 

114 

54 
379 
125 

51 

145 

80 
53 



349 
23 
54 
43 

11 
431 

322 

784 

69 
13 

102 



118 

26 

7 

33 



14,635 



Secretary of State 



2,584 
5,142 
' 1,040 
4,045 
2,860 

4,477 
3,378 
3,485 
4,002 
3,799 

2,521 
4,695 
6,643 
4,730 
5,396 

1,599 
5,487 
4,562 
2,353 
3,919 

13,006 
4,380 
2,479 
9,969 
3,948 

1,876 
15,778 

3,690 
12,810 

6,582 
2,448 
4,292 
3,300 

8,607 
3,420 
4,271 
3,997 



540,260 



1,845 
4,282 
1,169 
3,462 
3,217 

3,999 
3,961 
3,539 
1,960 
4,691 

2,740 
5,260 
3,398 
4,679 
4,213 

1,935 
6,627 
4,365 
2,046 
1,909 

12,559 
5,997 
2,623 
7,551 
3,813 

1,315 
15,139 

3,691 
15,648 



6,566 
4,390 
3,817 
4,132 



516,703 



° ja 



gCQCQ 



70 

118 

5 

365 

118 

54 

136 

83 
58 
62 
49 



55 
16 
85 
32 

177 

324 

21 

55 

49 



410 
320 
841 

74 

15 

106 

17 

128 

42 

5 

36 



14,717 



Samuel M. Ralston (Dem.) plurality 33,611. 
Ed Jackson (Rep.) plurality 23,557. 



Secretary of State 

ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 



51 



Counties 



A 


dditor of State 


Treasurer of State 


William G. 


Robert 


Cash A. 


Ora J. 


George H. 


Francis M. 


Oliver, 
R. 


Bracken, 
D. 


Carter, 

S. 


Davies, 
R. 


DeHority, 
D. 


Wampler, 

S. 


2,609 


4,288 


17 


2,606 


4,276 


17 


13,738 


16,757 


284 


13,671 


16,731 


285 


5,461 


6,006 


74 


5,902 


5,504 


73 


3,061 


2,355 


19 


3,070 


2,343 


19 


2,719 


2,956 




2,879 


2,823 


122 


5,903 


6,438 


35 


5,979 


6,358 


35 


850 


1,398 


21 


854 


1,381 


21 


4,327 


4,230 


29 


4,497 


4,030 


31- 


7,516 


8,982 


199 


8,029 


8,476 


201 


5,112 


6,171 


72 


5,120 


6,154 


72 


4,755 


5,920 


309 


4,820 


5,865 


313 


6,401 


7,135 


69 


6,730 


6,838 


68 


2,197 


2,659 


15 


2,194 


2,657 


16 


6,082 


6,112 


125 


6,064 


6,111 


128 


3,748 


5,308 


83 


4,380 


4,688 


81 


4,056 


4,948 


55 


5,005 


3,972 


50 


5,011 


5,575 


115 


5,039 


5,529 


114 


9,544 


8,173 


39 


11,445 


6,168 


39 


2,403 


4,878 


71 


2,589 


4,867 


67 


9,243 


7,229 


326 


9,359 


7,096 


330 


3,852 


3,604 


58 


4,469 


2,989 


56 


5,272 


6,926 


118 


5,263 


6,910 


119 


4,571 


4,713 


229 


4,688 


4,596 


225 


2,527 


4,819 


27 


3,484 


3,881 


19 


3,885 


3,859 


112 


3,886 


3,859 


113 


6,375 


7,183 


331 


6,644 


6,932 


327 


8,010 


9,032 


517 


9,006 


8,093 


506 


6,321 


6,974 


848 


6,564 


6,726 


855 


6,004 


4,300 


47 


6,256 


4,036 


44 


3,378 


4,718 


47 


3,581 


4,511 


42 


4,035 


4,446 


32 


3,868 


4,440 


31 


5,308 


4,463 


45 


5,705 


4,104 


42 


5,472 


6,326 


278. 


7,460 


4,534 


192 


6,144 


5,519 


1,736 


7,240 


4,679 


1,736 


6,677 


7,199 


141 


6,894 


7,052 


140 


3,912 


5,744 


81 


3,934 


5,716 


78 


3,480 


2,338 


29 


3,477 


2,347 


31 


5,252 


5,739 


71 


5,785 


5,223 


70 


5,162 


4,426 


57 


5,156 


4,416 


59 


3,075 


3,123 


56 


3,213 


3,006 


53 


4,783 


5,122 


66 


4,478 


5,303 


86 


7,672 


9,277 


659 


8,067 


8,896 


663 


6,608 


5,099 


100 


6,792 


4,900 


100 


3,215 


1,740 


19 


3,212 


1,741 


17 


15,089 


9,748 


387 


15,394 


9,366 


383 


7,915 


6,764 


304 


8,329 


6,373 


295 


5,463 


4,866 


76 


5,483 


4,859 


73 


12,442 


14,689 


520 


13,310 


13,911 


516 


■ 47,427 


44,505 


1,136 


47,143 


44,826 


1,154 


5,093 


5,046 


97 


5,087 


5,022 


96 


2,640 


2,769 


28 


2,634 


2,769 


29 


5,553 


7,400 


223 


5,843 


7,117 


215 


4,795 


5,070 


46 


4,939 


4,915 


41 


7,403 


6,843 


55 


7,505 


6,750 


56 


4,390 


4,773 


77 


4,803 


4,376 


74 


2,595 


1,841 


7 


2,591 


1,841 


7 


4,904 


4,479 


83 


5,230 


4,164 


83 


989 


1,207 




1,036 


1,161 




4,030 


3,463 


38 


4,016 


3,471 


38 


2,639 


3,409 


69 


1 2,906 


3,145 


66 



Allen 

Bartholomew 

Benton 

Blackford.... 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Cass 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford — 

Daviess 

Dearborn 

Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware 

Dubois 

Elkhart 

Fayette 

Floyd........ 

Fountain 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant 

Greene 

Hamilton — 
Hancock 

Harrison 

Hendricks . . . 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington . . 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jay 

Jefferson .... 
Jennings — 

Johnson 

Knox 

Kosciusko . . . 
LaGrange . . . 
Lake 

Laporte 

Lawrence. . . 
Madison — 

Marion 

Marshall 

Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery 
Morgan 

Newton 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 



52 



Year Book 

ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 



Counties 



Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph . . . 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

Steuben 

St. Joseph. . 

Sullivan 

Switzerland. 
Tippecanoe . . 
Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh 
Vermillion... 
Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick . 

Washington . 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley 

Total... 



Auditor of State 



William G, 

Oliver, 

R. 



4,417 
3,372 
3,516 
3,847 
3,751 

2,492 
4,584 
5,785 
4,551 

4,874 

1,577 
5,123 
4,559 
2,342 
3,780 

12,907 
4,215 
2,469 
9,910 
3,693 

1,613 

13,882 
3,579 
12,568 

6,196 
2,403 
4,208 
3,271 

7,696 
3,334 
4,221 
3,972 



517,800 



Robert 

Bracken, 

D. 



3,985 
3,958 
3,575 
1,984 
4,726 

2,742 
5,109 
4,115 
4,832 
4,667 

1,945 
6,910 
4,363 
2,028 
1,698 

12,684 
6,008 
2,696 
7,703 
4,022 

1,554 
17,146 

3,721 
15,717 

5,435 

1,278 
4,578 
4,109 

7,239 
4,431 
3,820 
4,130 



533,987 



Cash A. 

Carter, 

S. 



115 
48 
366 
132 
53 

131 

83 



53 

10 
56 
17 
87 
31 

177 

345 
20 
56 
55 

11 

467 
323 
844 

75 

16 

103 

19 

135 

44 

5 

34 



14,852 



Treasurer op State 



Ora J. 

Da vies, 

R. 



4,478 
3,371 
3,535 
4,053 
3,810 

2,492 
4,619 
6,721 
4,753 
5,552 

1,583 
5,536 
4,563 
2,343 
3,789 

13,030 

4,299 
2,469 
9,947 
3,884 

1,820 
16,349 
3,669 

12,857 

6,625 
2,440 
4,234 
3,251 

8,542 
3,356 
4,206 
3,990 



541,769 



George H. 

DeHority, 

D. 



3,967 
3,963 
3,553 
1,932 
4,652 

2,745 
5,255 
3,219 
4,625 
3,994 

1,947 
6,502 
4,370 
2,027 
1,691 

12,562 
5,962 
2,691 
7,674 
3,842 

1,244 
14,682 

3,656 
15,565 

5,020 
1,242 
4,574 
4,071 

6,363 
4,396 
3,838 
4,116 



510,763 



Francis M. 
Wampler, 

S. 



115 
48 
366 
126 
50 

131 

87 
57 
65 
50 

8 
50 
17 
90 
31 

178 

324 

21 

55 

47 

12 
481 
315 
850 

73 

17 

106 

17 

135 

42 

5 

35 



14,816 



Robert Bracken (Dem.) plurality 16,187. 
Ira J. Davies (Rep.) plurality, 3 1,006. 



Secretary of State 

ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued. 



53 





Clerk of Supreme Court 


Superintendent of 
Public Instruction 


Counties 


Patrick J. 
Lynch, R. 


Zachariah 

T. Dungan, 

D. 


HattieM. 
Hodges, S. 


Benjamin 

J. Burris, 

R. 


Daniel C. 

Mcintosh, 

D. 


Mary 

Fogleson, 

S. 




2,605 
13,684 
5,167 
3,085 
2,595 

5,811 

829 
4,294 
7,377 
5,131 

4,793 
6,386 
2,193 
6,087 
3,712 

3,959 
5,064 
8,946 
2,440 
9,161 

3,735 
5,258 
4,563 
2,530 
3,863 

6,337 

7,855 
6,250 
5,671 
2,928 

4,098 
4,795 
4,484 
6,152 
6,413 

3,870 
3,494 
5,094 
5,115 
3,067 

4,190 
7,641 
6,542 
3,188 
14,998 

7,877 
5,455 
11,757 
37,829 
4,994 

2,653 

5,497 
4,734 
7,345 
4,124 

2,592 
4,869 
989 
4,017 
2,587 


4,256 
16,713 
6,228 
2,340 
3,056 

6,515 
1,407 
4,216 
9,067 
6,135 

5,844 
7,175 
2,655 
6,071 
5,305 

4,984 
5,505 
8,443 
4,849 
7,227 

3,675 
6,929 

4,727 
4,762 
3,874 

7,224 
1,991 
6,987 
4,506 
5,048 

4,378 
4,739 
7,167 
5,490 
7,517 

5,748 
2,311 
5,826 
4,441 
3,114 

5,532 
9,242 
5,126 
1,750 
9,705 

6,668 
4,865 
15,096 
51,609 
5,091 

2,745 
7,457 
5,084 
6,888 
4,975 

1,841 
4,491 
1,203 
3,460 
3,445 


19 
283 
74 
18 
125 

40 
22 
29 
226 
71 

317 
70 
15 

128 
86 

53 
124 

41 

68 

347 

58 
122 
227 

27 
116 

330 

533 

853 

56 

57 

35 
51 

346 
1,753 

139 

83 
34 
74 
64 
57 

85 
665 
105 

20 
414 

320 

75 

544 

1,412 

106 

30 
229 
48 
55 
79 

7 
84 


2,605 
13,673 
5,705 
3,057 
2,834 

5,978 
844 
4,463 
7,840 
5,108 

4,761 
6,737 
2,192 
6,225 
4,159 

4,844 
4,987 
10,887 
2,556 
9,373 

4,211 
5,242 
4,670 
3,090 
3,883 

6,526 
8,583 
6,256 
6,201 
3,524 

4,029 
5,656 
6,742 
6,618 
6,786 

3,906 
3,455 
5,621 
5,140 
3,200 

4,475 
7,806 
6,739 
3,205 
15,346 

8,424 
5,500 
13,337 
47,762 
5,077 

2,645 
5,660 
4,908 
7,490 
4,637 

2,597 
5,129 
1,025 
4,023 
2,809 


4,252 
16,739 
5,650 
2,357 

2,847 

6,371 
1,375 
4,061 
8,607 
6,150 

5,878 
6,939 
2,663 
6,014 
4,851 

4,151 

5,589 
6,435 
4,684 
7,058 

3,211 
6,917 
4,618 
4,022 
3,854 

7,004 
8,256 
7,128 
4,062 
4,571 

4,437 
4,184 

5,247 
4,794 
7,068 

5,765 
2,339 
5,316 
4,416 
3,003 

5.295 
9,045 
4,913 
1,743 
9,403 

6,500 
4,838 
13,904 
44,170 
5,019 

2,758 
7,241 
4,926 
6,753 
4,511 

1,841 
4,248 
1,173 
3,464 
3,231 


19 


Allen 


280 




72 




19 




123 




35. 




22 


Carroll 


29 




217 


Clark 


66 


Clay 


319 




63 




16 




121 




82 




48 


Dekalb 


120 




40 




67 


Elkhart 


338 




62 




121 




227 




21 


Fulton 


113 




331 




538 




839 




46 




41 




37 




40 




217 




1,768 




147 




81 




31 




73 




62 




52 




90 




662 




99 




19 




387 




327 




74 




518 




1,144 




103 




30 




218 




46 




53 




76 




7 




82 








40 
70 


39 




69 



54 



Year Book 

ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued. 



Counties 



Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 

Pulaksi 

Putnam .... 
Randolph.. . 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

Steuben .... 

St. Joseph. . 

Sullivan 

Switzerland . 
Tippecanoe . . 
Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh 
Vermillion. . 
Vigo 

Wabash .... 

Warren 

Warrick .... 
Washington . 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley.... 

Total... 



Clerk of Supreme Court 



Patrick J. 
Lynch, R. 



4,374 
3,374 
3,502 
3,897 
3,704 

2,475 

4,532 
5,578 
4,540 
4,623 

1,569 
4,839 
4,499 
2,317 
3,784 

13,064 
4,209 
2,458 
9,908 
3,684 

1,504 
14,295 

3,587 
12,461 

6,139 

2,382 
4,197 
3,253 

7,281 
3,284 
4,093 
3,953 



500,128 



Zachariah 

T. Dungan, 

D. 



3,998 
3,949 
3,580 
2,006 
4,756 

2,764 
5,533 
4,219 
4,825 
4,850 

1,948 
7,103 

4,400 
2,047 
1,681 

12,521 

5,988 
2,701 
7,712 
4,030 

1,615 
17,026 

3,764 
15,723 

5,481 
1,290 
4,574 
4,098 

7,580 
4,450 
3,930 
4,147 



546,107 



HattieM. 
Hodges, S. 



123 
48 
363 
141 
53 

129 
83 
73 
69 
52 

8 
60 
17 



183 
328 
20 
58 
54 

17 
459 
321 



79 
17 
104 
18 

156 

45 

6 

38 



15,601 



Superintendent op 
Public Instruction 



Benjamin 

J. Burris, 

R. 



6,464 
4,704 
5,333 

1,589 
5,363 
4,562 
2,333 
3,749 

13,093 
4,223 
2,471 
9,956 
3,824 

1,850 
16,203 

3,557 
12,644 

6,487 
2,415' 
4,214 
3,248 

8,272 
3,356 
4,194 
3,987 



535,118 



Daniel C. 

Mcintosh, 

D. 



3,967 
3,962 
3,544 
1,893 
4,667 

2,749 
5,211 
3,379 
4,657 
4,204 

1,925 
6.651 
4,370 
2,027 
1,706 

12,497 
5,964 
2,688 
7,669 
3,874 

1,307 
15,600 

3,710 
15,559 

5,100 
1,249 
4,557 
4,113 

6,363 
4,382 
3,838 
4,120 



515,361 



Mary 
Fogleson, 

S. 



364 
133 
53 

128 
85 
65 
65 
47 



57 
17 
87 
35 

181 

329 

20 



12 
415 
323 



80 



159 

40 

6 

37 



Zachariah T. Dungan (Dem.) plurality 45,979. 
Benjamin J. Burris (Rep.) plurality 19,757. 



Secretary of State 



55 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued. 

JUDGE SUPREME COURT 

Second District 



Counties 


G3 

Q 


a 2 3 


John Nipp, Sr., 
Socialist 


Counties 


< SB'S 


" -Q 

o 

i-a 


m 

*•§ 
MS 

o 




2,617 

13,683 
6,042 
3,024 
2,884 

6,031 
879 
4,532 
8,081 
5,117 

4,790 
6,757 
2,197 
6,101 
4,353 

5,124 
5,055 
11,436 
2,601 
9,383 

4,371 

5,254 
4,725 
3,396 
3,887 

6,607 
9,057 
6,559 
6,364 
3,661 

4,037 

5,782 
7,515 
7,189 
6,822 

3,880 
3,451 
5,820 
5,149 
3,199 

4,599 
8,040 
6,777 
3,211 
15,427 
8,271 


4,248 
16,737 
5,375 
2,357 
2,791 

6,304 
1,350 
3,997 
8,431 
6,150 

5,854 
6,819 
2,653 
6,080 
4,706 

3,903 
5,516 
6,084 
4,679 
7,063 

2,971 

6,932 
4,564 
3,980 
3,849 

6,933 

7,961 
6,718 
3,890 
4,412 

4,435 

3,986 
4,445 
4,483 
7,039 

5,820 
2,349 
5,170 
4,408 
3,001 

5,140 

8,861 
4,844 
1,734 
9,353 
6,408 


16 
281 

• 76 
18 
126 

33 
21 
31 

197 
67 

314 
67 
15 

124 

49 
111 
37 
67 
325 

56 
119 
224 

19 
115 

329 

507 

841 

54 

48 

32 

46 

184 

1,724 

135 

77 
32 
71 
54 
53 

71 

659 

98 

17 

382 

295 


Lawrence 

Madison 


5,480 
13,643 
50,205 
5,104 
2,631 

5,830] 

4,972] 
7,544 
4,877 
2,595 

5,240 

1,043 
4,016 
2,945 
4,423 

3,362 
3,549 
4,020 
3,796 
2,482 

4,615 
6,697 
4,777 
5,659 
1,560 

5,619 

4,556 
2,327 
'3,786 
13,003 

4,207 

2,470 
9,975 
3,908 
1,945 

16,467 
3,582 

12,753 
6,602 
2,427 

4,200 
3,253 
8,642 
3.397 
4,215 
3,998 


4,856 
13,588 
40,909 
5,498 
2,776 

7,010 

4,883 
6,712 
4,270 
1,842 

4,156 
1,146 
3,459 
3,091 
3,958 

3,957 
3,538 
1,883 
4,752 
2,753 

5,257 

3,203 
4,599 
3,881 
2,001 

6,406 
4,378 
2,038 
1,684 
12,581 

5,969 
2,686 
7,651 
3,797- 
1,234 

14,912 
3,703 

15,568 
5,000 
1,234 

4,562 
4,052 
6,251 
4,344 
3,814 
4,103 


71 


Allen 


515 




1,275 




Marshall 


96' 


Blackford 


29 






217 






41 


Carroll 


Montgomery 


52 

77 


Clark 




8 


Clay 


Noble 


83 


Ohio 








39 






69 




Parke. . . 


115 






48 


Dekalb 


Pike 


366 






128 






49 


Elkhart. 




127 






82 


Floyd 


Randolph 


56 




63 




Rush 


49 


Fulton -. 


Scott 


8 




Shelby 


60 






16 






87 






30 




St. Joseph 


177 




318 


Hendricks 


Switzerland 

Tippecanoe 

Tipton 


20 
57 




48 


Huntington 




11 


Vanderburgh 

Vermillion 


443 




317 


Jay 


846 




73 






14 






103 




Washington 


16 




125 




Wells 


38 




White 


5 




Whitley 


35 




Total 






546,134 


504, 728 


14,796 









David A. Myers, (Rep.) Plurality 41,406. 



56 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

JUDGE APPELLATE COURT 

Fibst Division 



Counties 



Adams 

Allen 

Bartholomew 

Benton 

Blackford 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Cass 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford 

Daviess 

Dearborn 

Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware 

Dubois 

Elkhart 

Fayette 

Floyd 

Fountain 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant 

Greene 

Hamilton 

Hancock 

Harrison 

Hendricks 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington . . 

Jackson 

Jasp 
Jay 
Jefferson. . . . 
Jennings 

Johnson 

Knox 

Kosciusko. . . 
Lagrange . . . 
Lake 

Laporte 

Lawrence. . . 

Madison 

Marion 

Marshall 

Martin . 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery 
Morgan 



First Division 



CO 



2,571 
13,642 
5,602 
3,016 
2,784 

5,981 
836 
4,422 
7,632 
5,066 

4,727 
6,649 
2,182 
6,041 
4,098 

4,817 
4,964 
10,657 
2,475 
9,137 

4,189 
5,208 
4,660 
3,135 
3,863 



8,413 
6,356 
6,129 
3,423 

4,022 
5,653 
6,807 
6,460 



3,867 
3,438 
5,544 
5,107 
3,160 

4,419 

7,718 
6,660 
3,198 
15,372 

7,773 
5,433 
13,494 
45,642 
5,036 

2,622 
5,611 

4,818 
7,454 
4,578 



F3MQ 



4,261 
16,748 
5,698 
2,360 
2,864 

6,364 
1,381 
4,083 
8,767 
6,163 

5,880 
6,932 
2,650 
6,102 
4,861 

4,156 
5,559 
6,551 
4,731 
7,199 

3,223 
6,931 
4,604 
4,076 
3,863 

7,025 
8,336 

6,874 
4,068 
4,583 

4,420 
4,173 
5,095 
4,814 
7,139 

5,732 
2,339 
5,371 

4,426 
3,022 

5,255 
9,072 
4,962 
1,736 
9,395 

6,652 
4,881 
13,864 
43,649 
5,038 

2,772 
7,253 
4,925 
6,765 
4,528 









16 

281 

74 

19 

123 

32 
20 
27 
200 
67 

314 
63 
16 

126 
84 

47 
113 
36 
71 
330 

55 
121 
224 

18 
116 

332 
516 
841 

54 
44 



?03 

1,770 

139 

82 
29 
71 
58 
55 

93 
656 



313 

74 

516 

1,552 

98 

29 
218 
45 
54 
75 



First Division 






2,574 
13,650 
6,166 
3,034 
2,853 

6,042 
853 

4,498 
7,822 
5,473 

4,724 
6,749 
2,185 
6,034 
4,304 

5,047 
4,990 
11,188 
2,557 



4,345 
5,211 
4,704 
3,348 

3,876 

6,575 
8,850 
6,492 
6,290 
3,563 

4,011 

5,747 
7,244 



3,929 
3,448 
5,742 
5,135 
3,206 

4,554 
7,961 
6,742 
3,188 
15,449 

8,119 
5,468 
13,479 
49,708 
5,042 

2,628 
5,760 
4,965 
7,486 
4,799 



4,241 
16,723 
5,325 
2,356 
2,808 



1,366 
4,010 
8,569 
6,140 

5,857 
6,827 
2,651 
6,093 
4,714 

3,955 
5,552 
6,376 
4,656 
7,124 

2,976 
6,909 
4,576 
3,961 
3,847 

6,921 
8,013 
6,700 
3,921 
4,489 

4,423 
4,039 
4,686 
4,440 
7,087 

5,680 
2,332 
5,222 
4,410 
2,989 

5,173 

8,869 
4,888 
1,730 
9,264 

6,477 
4,838 
13,770 
41,699 
5,021 

2,769 
7,125 
4,832 
6,743 
4,348 



Secretary of State 



57 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

JUDGE APPELLATE COURT 

First Division 



Counties 



Newton 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 

Parke 

Perry. 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott. 

Shelby 

Spencer — 

Starke 

Steuben 

St. Joseph 

Sullivan 

Switzerland . . . 
Tippecanoe . . . 
Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh. . 
Vermillion 
Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington. . . 

Wayne 

Wells......... 

White. 

Whitley 

Total 



First Division 



2,593 
5,132 
1,018 
4,005 
2,784 

4,352 
3,366 
3,517 
3,938 
3,722 

2,452 
4,689 
6,348 
4,681 
5,289 

1,572 
5,338 
4,562 
2,317 
3,760 

12,988 
3,984 
2,464 
9,963 
3,796 

1,822 
16,006 

3.501 
12,447 

6,432 
2,407 
4,207 
3,251 

7,908 
3,310 

4,177 
3,968 



527,958 



a*§ 



3mQ 



1,842 
4,238 
1,171 
3,463 
3,218 

4,004 
3,951 
3,550 
1,904 
4,699 

2,750 
5,253 
3,411 
4,677 
4,235 

1,939 
6,637 
4,369 
2,042 
1,697 

12,604 
6,366 
2,692 
7,664 
3,878 

1,317 

15,199 
3,753 
15,690 

5,133 
1,239 
4,553 
4,042 

6,483 
4,395 
3,839 
4,126 



516,194 



£« 



65 



116 

48 



126 

48 



81 
60 
64 
47 

10 
69 
16 
86 
32 

175 
326 
20 
56 
51 

11 

409 
318 



75 

14 

104 

17 

140 

39 

3,839 

35 



19,054 



First Division 



i: s a? 
o 



2,593 

5,198 
1,035 
4,012 

2,878 

4,376 
3,366 
3,518 
3,971 
3,768 

2,462 
4,589 
6,631 
4,749 
5,606 

1,361 
5,540 
4,565 
2,318 
3,752 

13,005 
4,145 
2,465 
9,977 

3,882 

1,919 
16,119 

3,547 
12,505 

6,560 
2,404 
4,199 
3,255 

8,391 
3,331 
4,179 
3.972 



540,996 






1,843 
4,169 
1,153 
3,461 
3,142 

3,968 
3,948 
3,533 
1,886 
4,656 

2,762 
5,247 
3,187 
4,610 
3,925 

1,943 
6,466 
4,369 
2,030 
1,695 

12,586 
5,946 
2,686 
7,652 
3,801 

1,240 

15,494 
3,685 
15,539 

5,006 
1,237 
4,153 
4,030 

6,223 
4,365 
3,829 
4,117 



506,388 






39 
67 

113 

48 
367 
125 

47 

128 
79 
56 
64 
49 

7 

58 
16 
86 
31 

176 
318 
,20 
56 
52 



321 

847 

76 

14 

103 

16 

132 

38 

6 

35 



14, 682 



Solon A. Enloe (Rep.) plurality 11,764. 
Chas. F. Remy (Rep.) plurality 34,608 



58 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

JUDGE APPELLATE COURT 

Second Division 



Counties 



Adams 

Allen 

Bartholomew 

Benton 

Blackford . . . 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Cass 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford 

Daviess 

Dearborn 

Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware 

Dubois 

Elkhart 

Fayette 

Floyd 

Fountain 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant 

Greene 

Hamilton 
Hancock. . . . 

Harrison 

Hendricks... 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington . . 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jay 

Jefferson 

Jennings 

Johnson 

Knox 

Kosciusko. . . 
Lagrange. . . . 
Lake 

Laporte 

Lawrence 
Madison. 

Marion 

Marshall . 

Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery 
Morgan , 



Second Division 


Second Division 


9 « 

3 o 8- 


.9 a 9 


bO-j'o 

o 


a 

03 

ill 

<3 


. 9? 2 

" cj o 


-^.js is 


2,578 


4,248 


19 


2,572 


4,241 


18 


13,521 


16,548 


286 


13,637 


16,729 


270 


5,600 


5,706 


75 


5,632 


5,658 


76 


3,037 


2,349 


17 


2,973 


2,422 


18 


2,788 


2,851 


124 


2,805 


2,831 


125 


5,969 


6,382 


32 


5,972 


6,371 


32 


834 


1,385 


20 


830 


1,372 


20 


4,437 


4,073 


27 


4,435 


4,070 


28 


7,641 


8,737 


212 


7,742 


8,613 


209 


5,080 


6,143 


69 


5,073 


6,133 


67 


4,761 


5,816 


317 


4,733 


5,843 


307 


6,644 


6,937 


63 


6,638 


6,943 


63 


2,184 


2,646 


15 


2,180 


2,648 


15 


6,045 


6,077 


131 


6,043 


6,075 


128 


4,150 


4,833 


87 


4,128 


4,844 


85 


4,828 


4,149 


47 


4,829 


4,146 


46 


5,001 


5,526 


115 


4,973 


5,550 


115 


10,530 


6,556 


41 


10,714 


6,361 


39 


2,478 


4,708 


73 


2,473 


4,695 


72 


9,122 


7,193 


327 


9,126 


7, 144 


334 


4,184 


3,212 


60 


4,191 


3,190 


56 


5,215 


6,914 


121 


5,219 


6,894 


116 


4,601 


4,685 


230 


4,637 


4,616 


234 


3,158 


4,060 


18 


3,146 


4,055 


19 


3,880 


3,857 


113 


3,864 


3,845 


112 


6,474 


6,986 


334 


6,458 


6,998 


334 


8,421 


8,300 


533 


8,427 


8,237 


519 


6,392 


6,808 


, 841 


6,347 


6,827 


832 


6,122 


4,072 


56 


6,102 


4,069 


56 


3,430 


4,572 


46 


3,447 


4,551 


48 


4,019 


4,407 


34 


4,009 


4,417 


31 


5,645 


4,214 


41 


5,606 


4,200 


41 


6,660 


5,287 


205 


6,554 


5,229 


211 


6,449 


4,763 


1,838 


6,537 


4,631 


1,815 


6,706 


7,116 


135 


6,702 


7,079 


138 


3,884 


5,705 


86 


3,875 


5,718 


87 


3,459 


2,323 


29 


3,435 


2,336 


30 


5,531 


5,382 


69 


5,594 


5,301 


72 


5,125 


4,397 


60 


5,125 


4,410 


55 


3,174 


3,009 


54 


3,158 


3,009 


54 


4,410 


5,244 


93 


4,405 


5,226 


93 


7,747 


9,013 


661 


7,736 


9,011 


658 


6,664 


4,955 


98 


6,686 


4,923 


99 


3,193 


1,736 


18 


3,207 


1,716 


18 


15,442 


9,342 


385 


15,355 


9,388 


396 


7,920 


6,601 


309 


7,990 


6,554 


311 


5,446 


4,848 


72 


5,346 


4,849 


74 


13,353 


13,907 


514 


13,358 


13,919 


518 


44,921 


44,233 


1,632 


45,945 


43,456 


1,578 


5,042 


5,017 


99 


5,030 


5,010 


94 


2,620 


2,763 


30 


2,628 


2,766 


30 


5,578 


7,321 


214 


5,615 


7,234 


217 


4,866 


4,918 


40 


4,862 


4,913 


44 


7,426 


6,796 


53 


7,440 


- 6,764 


57 


4,589 


4,515 


82 


4,591 


4,501 


78 



Secretary of State 



59 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

JUDGE APPELLATE CORT 

Second Division 



Counties 



Newton 

Noble....... 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen , 

Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

Steuben 

St. Joseph 

Sullivan 

Switzerland . . . 
Tippecanoe . . . 
Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh . . 
Vermillion 
Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington. . . 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley 

Total 



Second Division 



g 5 



2,595 
5,115 
1,018 
4,007 
2,772 

4,357 
3,357 
3,520 
4,031 
3,735 

2,470 
4,585 
6,333 
4,678 
5,317 

1,571 

5,321 
4,566 
2,313 
3,765 

13,566 
4,170 
2,466 
9,952 
3,807 

1,853 
15,604 

3,550 
12,458 

6,385 
2,382 
4,205 
3,258 

7,990 
3,317 
4,183 
3,964 



527,510 



a > 1 

> 



1,840 

4,247 
1,169 
3,465 
3,226 

3,977 
3,947 
3,544 
1,853 
4,662 

2,736 
5,236 
3,415 
4,666 
4,206 

1,932 
6,650 
4,366 
2,034 
1,684 

12,613 
5,919 
2,684 
7,668 
3,858 

1,311 
15,501 

3,697 
15,558 

5,166 
1,271 
4,550 
4,026 

6,402 
4,378 
3,825 
4,120 



515,543 






115 
50 
363 
129 
49 

128 
81 
59 
64 
47 



32 



323 
20 
56 
53 



321 

852 



140 

38 
5 
35 



15,449 



Second Division 



^■S: 



11 



5,113 

1,018 
4,009 
2,777 

4,337 
3,360 
3,495 
3,943 
3,729 

2,465 
4,551 
6,608 
4,681 
5,309 

1,563 
5,343 
4,561 
2,334 
3,758 

12,974 
4,145 
2,459 
9,954 
3,826 

1,833 
15,990 

3,519 
12,507 

6,452 
2,332 
4,191 
3,255 

8,017 
3,322 
4,178 
3,986 



528,622 



f^> a 



1,842 
4,234 
1,172 
3,457 
3,214 

3,999 
3,949 
3,437 
1,879 
4,662 

2,742 
5,261 
3,338 
4,663 
4,201 

1,938 
6,634 
4,370 
2,023 
1,687 

12,616 
5,917 
2,686 
7,678 
3,837 

1,307 
15,612 

3,707 
15,499 

5,077 
1,355 
4,554 
4,019 

6,384 
4,362 
3,823 
4,109 



513,775 



II 



S£< 



119 
50 
366 
120 
51 

131 

86 
56 
63 

48 

7 
57 
16 

87 
32 

172 

323 
,20 
56 
52 

11 
593 
318 
853 

77 

14 

102 

16 

141 
37 

7 
35 



15,505 



Willis C. McMahan (Rep.) plurality 11,967. 
Alonzo L. Nichols (Rep.) plurality 14,847. 



60 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 
REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS 
First District 



Counties 


Oscar R. 

Luhring, 

R. 


William E. 
Wilson, D. 


Francis A. 
Hallis, S. 




6,426 
3,547 
3,817 
4,569 
13,307 
4,169 


7,165 
3,655 
4,879 
4,372 
17,959 
4,767 


330 


Pike 


349 




37 




17 




471 




72 






Total. 


35,835 


42,807 


1,276 







William E. Wilson (Dem.) plurality 6,972. 



Second District 



Counties 


Oscar E. 
Bland, R. 


Arthur H. 

Greenwood, 

D. 


John C. 
Monarch, 

S. 




6,339 
7,110 
8,760 

2,722 
5,181 
4,771 
2,989 
4,880 


6,198 
6,858 
8,955 
2,798 
4,881 
4,560 
3,207 
6,175 


109 




705 




522 




24 




32 




66 




52 




241 






Total 


42,752 


43,632 


1,751 







Arthur H. Greenwood (Dem.) plurality 880. 



Third District 



Counties 


Samuel A. 

Lambdin, 

R. 


Frank 

Gardner, 

D. 


William J. 

McMillen, 

S. 


Clark 


5,174 
2,343 
2,535 
5,405 
4,083 
5,478 
4,066 
3,376 
1,400 
3,342 


6,047 
2,592 
4,777 
6,959 
4,381 
4,892 
3,493 
3,897 
2,141 
4,165 


58 




32 




98 


Floyd 


101 




27 




47 




33 






Scott . 






11 






Total 


37,202 


43,344 


407 







Frank Gardner (Dem.) plurality 6,142. 



Secretary of State 



61 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS— Continued 

Fourth District 



Counties 


John S. 

Benham, 

R. 


Harry C. 

Canfield, 

D. 




5,954 
915 
4,234 
4,977 
4,186 
5,184 
3,312 
4,646 
1,097 
4,743 
2,577 


5 647 




1,447 




5,107 




4 236 




5,784 




4,452 




3,096 




5 429 


Ohio 


1,116 




4,812 




2,623 








Total 


41,825 


43,749 





Harry C. Canfield (Dean.) majority 1,924. 



Fifth District 



Counties 


Everett 

Sanders, 

R. 


Charles H. 

Bidaman, 

D. 


Phillip K. 

Reinbolt, 

S. 


Clay 


5,622 
5,696 
4,851 
5,309 
3,914 
13,367 


5,380 
4,132 
3,739 
4,734 
3,682 
16,081 


306 




26 


Parke 


105 




58 




316 




939 






Total 


38,759 


37,748 


1,750 







Everett Sanders (Rep.) plurality 1,011 



Sixth District 



Counties 


Richard N. 
Elliott, R. 


James A, 
Clifton, D. 






4.388 
3,090 
3,581 
6,916 
5,394 
5,440 
1,886 
8,586 


3,253 




4,446 




4,590 




5,377 




' 4,262 


Shelby ; 


6,541 




1,352 




6,997 








Total 


39,281 


36,818 







Richard N. Elliott (Rep.) majority 2,463. 



Seventh District 



Counties 


Merrill 
Moores, R. 


Joseph P. 
Turk, D. 


Lester L. 

Lambert, 

S. 




49,629 


41,118 


1,394 








Total 


49,629 


41,118 


1,394 







Merrill Moores (Rep.) plurality 8,511. 



62 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS— Continued. 

Eighth District 



Counties 


Albert H. 
Vestal, R. 


John W. 

Tyndall, 

D. 


Henry C. 
Becker, S. 




2,403 
11,598 

5,489 
13,529 

6,926 

3,525 


4,982 
6,750 
5,712 
13,733 
3,545 
4,447 


11 




43 




54 




511 




52 


Wells 


26 






Total 


43,470 


39,169 


697 







Albert H. Vestal (Rep.) plurality 4,301. 



Ninth District 



Counties 


Fred S. 
Purnell, R. 


George Lee 
Moffett, D. 


John 

Leese, S. 




5,980 
4,583 
6,545 
4,548 
6,452 
7,340 
7,491 
3,980 


6,379 
4,030 
7,047 
4,810 
4,228 
4,961 
6,799 
3,820 


32 


Carroll 


20 




63 




221 








1,661 






Tipton 


43 






Total 


46,919 


42,074 


2,040 







Fred S. Purnell (Rep.) plurality 4 , 845. 



Tenth District 



Counties 


William R. 
Wood, R. 


William F. 
Spooner, D. 


Frank 
Field, S. 




3,294 
3,517 
15,421 
2,594 
4,008 
9,989 
2,470 
4,297 


2,241 
2,340 
9,421 
1,849 
2,247 
7,631 
1,298 
3,808 


9 




28 




391 




7 




107 




51 




29 


White 








Total 


45,590 


30,835 


623 







William R. Wood (Rep.) plurality 14,755. 

Eleventh District 



Counties 


Milton 
Kraus, R. 


Samuel E. 
Cook D. 


Harry K. 
Otis, S. 




2,923 
8,364 
6,825 
6,908 
5,381 
2,555 
6,329 


2,915 

8,527 
10,528 
7,221 
7,872 
2,740 
5,586 


89 




136 




594 




132 




201 




132 




88 






Total 


39,285 


45,389 


1,372 







Samuel E. Cook, (Dem.) plurality 6,104. 



Secretary of State 



63 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 
REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS— Continued. 
Twelfth District 



Counties 


Louis W. 

Fairfield 

R. 


Charles W. 

Branstrator, 

D. 


Allen 


13,740 
5,462 
3,409 
5,353 
3,971 
4,110 


17, 142 
5,443 
1,750 


Dekalb 




Noble 


4 298 




1,663 


Whitley - 


4,161 








Total 


36,045 


34,457 







Louis W. Fairfield (Rep.) majority 1,588. 



Thirteenth District 



Counties 


Andrew J. 

Hickey, 

R. 


Esther 

Kathleen 

O'Keefe, D. 


Elkhart 


9,517 
4,001 
7,011 
9,405 
• 5,397 
2,383 
12,288 


7,595 


Fui ton 


3,793 




4,908 




6,359 




5,032 




2,101 




13,265 








Total 


50,003 


43,053 





Andrew J. Hickey (Rep.) majority 6,950. 



STATE SENATORS 



County 


William E. 

Bowers, 
Republican 


Robert B. 
Shirley, 
Democrat 


Allen 


13,617 


, 16,950 






Robert B. Shirley (Dem.) majority 3,333. 


County 


Culla J. 

Vayhinger, 
Republican 


OraC. 

King, 

Democrat 


Michael M. 
Confer, 
Socialist 




7,953 


9,524 


487 






Ora C. King (Dem.) plurality 1, 571. 


County 


William F. 

Hodges, 
Republican 


Frank R. 
Martin, 
Democrat 


Frank J. 

Kelly, 

Socialist 




15,367 


9,423 


386 







William F. Hodges (Rep.) plurality 5,944. 



64 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 
STATE SENATORS-Continued 



County 


Thomas A. 

Daily, 
Republican 


Albert A. 

Henry, 

Democrat 


Edward 
Henry, 
Socialist 




49,859 


41,243 


1,286 






Thomas A. Daily (Rep.) plurality 8, 616. 


County 


Helen M. 
Anderson, 
Republican 


Chester A. 
Perkins, 
Democrat 




12,213 


13,407 




Chester A. Perkins (Dem.) majority 1, 194. 


County 


Denver C. 

Harlan, 

Republican 


Mrs. Lillie M. 
Tweedy, 
Democrat 




8,632 


6,853 





Denver C. Harlan (Rep.) majority 1,779. 

JOINT STATE SENATORS 



Counties 


Weldon 
Lambert, 
Republican 


George P. 

Cline, 
Democrat 




5,892 
4,995 
3,393 
2,011 


5,517 




4,013 




3,960 




1,128 






Total 


16,291 


14,618 







Weldon Lambert (Rep.) majority 1,673. 



Counties 


Charles E. 

Watson, 

Republican 


Charles S. 

Batt, 
Democrat 


George 
Adams, 
Socialist 




4,820 
12,820 


5,513 
15,746 






897 






Total 


17,640 


21,259 


897 







Charles S. Batt (Dem.) plurality 3, 619. 





Counties 


Eugene C. 

Wharf, 
Republican 


Perry 
Easton, 
Democrat 




6,179 
8,003 


5,973 




9,062 








Total 


14, 182 


15,035 









Perry Easton (Dem.)jnajority 853. 



Secretary of State 



65 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 
JOINT STATE SENATORS— Continued 



Counties 


Will K. 

Penrod, 

Republican 


James B. 
Marshall, 
Democrat 




5,459 
2,861 
4,004 


4,821 




2,548 




3,426 








Total 


12,324 


10,795 





Will K. Penrod (Rep.) majority 1,529. 



Counties 


Frank V. 
McCullough, 
Republican 


C. Pralle 

Erni, 
Democrat 




2,182 
5,550 
4,025 


2,553 


Floyd 


6,823 




4,291 








Total... 


11,757 


13,667 







C. Pralle Erni (Dem.) majority 1,910. 



Counties 


Ovid C. 
Richardson, 
Republican 


J. Francis 
Lockard, 
Democrat 




3,965 
3,185 
4,632 


4,849 




3,145 




4,768 








Total 


11,782 


12,762 









J. Francis Lockard (Dem.) majority, 



Counties 


Andrew M. 

Stevens, 
Republican 


Joseph M. 
Cravens, 
Democrat 


Clark 


5,031 

4,765 

947 

2,477 


5,962 




4,736 


Ohio . .- . . 


1,213 




2,650 








Total 


13,220 


14,561 









Joseph M. Cravens (Dem.) majority, 1,341. 



Counties 


Norman B. 

Ficken, 
Republican 


John 
Sweeney, 
Democrat, 


Noah T. 
Garland, 
Socialist 




2,585 
3,310 
4,599 


4,568 
3,842 
4,321 


78 








13 






Total 


10,494 


12,731 


91 







John Sweeney (Dem.) plurality, 2,237. 
5—22978 



66 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 
JOINT STATE SENATORS— Continued 



Counties 


William 

Brown, 

Republican 


George W. 
Thompson, 
Democrat 


Lloyd 
McColley, 
Socialist 




3,404 
2,597 
4,191 
2,204 


2,355 
1,856 
1,886 
3.114 


24 




6 


Porter 


95 




124 






Total 


12,396 


9,211 


249 







William Brown (Rep.) plurality, 3,185. 



Counties 


Oliver 

Kline. 

Republican 


John C. 
Crosby, 
Democrat 


Edward A. 
Reynolds, 
Socialist 




6,748 
4,024 


7,202 
4,077 


124 


Whitley 








Total 


10,772 


11,279 


124 







John C. Crosby (Dem.) plurality, 507. 



Counties 


Grant 

Pyle, 

Republican 


George L. 
Saunders, 
Democrat 




2,526 
2,817 
3,444 


4,191 


Blackford 


2,876 


Wells 


4.357 








Total 


8,787 


11,424 







George L. Saunders (Dem.) majority, 2,637. 



Counties 


William S. 

Mercer, 
Republican 


James P. 

Davis, 
Democrat 


Frank L. 
Arbuckle, 
Socialist 




5,475 
4,039 


6,350 
8,994 


1,730 




194 






Total 


9,514 


15,344 


1,924 







James P. Davis (Dem.) plurality, 5,830. 





Counties 


Frank W. 

Merry, 
Republican 


W. Edward 

Avers, 
Democrat 




5,540 
6,545 


5,495 




3.447 








Total 


12,085 


8,942 







Frank W. Merry (Rep.) majority, 3,143. 



Secretary of State 



67 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 
JOINT STATE SENATORS— Continued 



Counties 


John S. 
Alldredge, 
Republican 


Walter S. 
Chambers, 
Democrat 




3,446 

6,475 
13,493 


4,583 
5 711 






13 773 








Total 


23,414 


24,067 





Walter S. Chambers (Dem.), 653. 



Counties 


Murray S 

Barker. 

Republican 


Joeeph W. 

Klntz, 
Democrat 




6,049 

6.289 
3,820 


6,305 




4,069 




3.832 






Total 


16,158 


14,206 







Murray S. Barker (Rep.) majority, 1,952. 



Counties 


Ray M. 
South worth, 
Republican 


John 
Lackey, 
Democrat 




2,784 
10,004, 


2,621 




7,622 






Total 


12,788 


10,243 







Ray M. Southworth (Rep.) majority, 2,545. 



Counties 


Howard 

O'Nnall, 

Republican 


Andrew E. 
Durham, 
Democrat 




7,420 
4.426 


6,814 




5,638 








Total 


11,846 


12,452 







Andrew E. Durham (Dem.) majority, 



Counties 


George 

Peed, 

Republican 


Harvey 
Harmon, 
Democrat 




6,427 
3,493 


7.032 


Pike . - 


3,596 








Total 


9,920 


10,628 







Harvey Harmon (Dem.) majority, 708. 



68 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

JOINT STATE SENATORS— Continued 



Counties 


Roger D. 

Gough, 

Republican 


Jacob 

Lutz, 

Democrat 


John T. 
Schlabib, 
Socialist 




3,653 
15,912 
4,134 


4,650 
15,610 
4,735 


34 




435 




63 






Total 


23,699 


24,995 


532 







Jacob Lutz (Dem.) plurality, 1,296. 



STATE REPRESENTATIVES 



County 


Thomas 

Dexter, 

Republican 


Peter A. 
Boland, 
Democrat 


Harry K. 

Allen, 

Socialist 




34,737 


45,715 


2,187 








County 


LukeW. 
Duffey, 

Republican 


John M. 
Maxwell, 
Democrat 


Walter 
Churchill, 
Socialist 




49,037 


42,211 


1,269 








County 


Russell B. 
Harrison, 
Republican 


Jerry 
O'Connor, 
Democrat 


David 
Creek, 
Socialist 




49,403 


41,338 


1,312 








County 


J. N. Hurty, 
Republican 


Edgar A. 
Perkins, 
Democrat 


James R. 
Francis, 
Socialist 






48,307 


47,501 


1,402 








County 


Walther 

Lieber, 

Republican 


Louis C. 

Schwartz, 
Democrat 


Charles M. 
Leslie, 
Socialist 




39,628 


48,741 


1,489 








County 


Frank J. 

Noll, 

Republican 


LeoX. 

Smith, 

Democrat 


Henry S. 
Newland, 
Socialist 




40,824 


43,004 


1,885 







Secretary of State 



69 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

STATE REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



County 



County 


Elizabeth 

Rainey, 

Republican 


George C. 
Stelhom, 
Democrat 


Delia 

Nunes, 
Socialist 




47,466 


46,790 


1,294 






County 


Asa J. 

Smith, 

Republican 


William A. 

Taylor, 
Democrat 


Thomas 
Sturgeon, 
Socialist 




49,274 


42,507 


1,243 






County 


Omer L. 

Traub, 

Republican 


J. Olias 

Vanier, 

Democrat 


Rollie C. 

Trees, 

Socialist 




49,778 


41,521 


1,257 








County 


Ralph E. 

Updike, 

Republican 


John C. 

Wagner, 
Democrat 


Flora 

Trees, 

Socialist 




49,567 


41,501 


1,285 








County 


Clarence C. 

Wysong, 
Republican 


Martin H. 

Walpole, 

Democrat 


George F. 

Yeo, 
Socialist 




49,637 


41,344 


1,241 








County 


Fred G. 

Duryee, 

Republican 


Waldemar 
Eickhoff, 
Democrat 


Allen. . 


13,599 


16,819 









Allen. 



Charles A. 

Phelps, 
Republican 



Howard M. 

Hobbs, 
Democrat 



16,685 



County 


Nathaniel C. 

Ross, 
Republican 


Arthur J. 
Ortlieb, 
Democrat 


Allen 


13,515 


16,969 







70 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 
STATE REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



County 


Wilbur L. 

Pruett, 
Republican 


John H. 

Schaefer, 
Democrat 


Oscar E. 
Snively, 
Socialist 




5,706 


5,721 


63 






John H. Schaefer (Dem.), plurality 15. 


County 


William U. 

Lane, 
Republican 


Edward B. 
Bender, 
Democrat 




5,896 


6,446 




Edward B. Bender (Dem.), majority 550. 


County 


Truman G. 

Murden, 
Republican 


John W. 

Pugh, 
Democrat 




9,012 


7,621 






Truman G. Murden (Rep.), majority 1,391. 


County 


Cecil B. 

Sharp, 

Republican 


Albert B. 

Clapp, 
Democrat 


Clark 


5,304 


5,978 






Albert B. Clapp (Dem.), majority 674. 




Paul 

Bennett, 

Republican 


Walter B. 

Ringo, 
Democrat 


Clay 


4,349 


6,592 






Walter B. Ringo (Dem.), majority 2,243. 


County 


Marshall 
Thatcher, 
Republican 


David L. 

Mabbitt, 
Democrat 




6,621 


6,985 






David L. Mabbitt (Dem.), majority 364. 




George L. 
Murdoch, 
Republican 


LewS. 

Core, 

Democrat 




5,869 


6,439 







Lew S. Core (Dem.), majority 570. 



Secretary of State 



71 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 
STATE REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



County 


Charles S. 

Arford, 
Republican 


Milo J. 
Thomas, 
Democrat 


Dekalb 


5,309 


5,381 




Milo J. Thomas (Dem.), majority 72. 


County 


Lemuel A. 
Pittenger, 
Republican 


Winfield S. 

Parker, 
Democrat 




11,739 


6,391 




Lemuel A. Pittenger (Rep.), majority 5,348. 


County 


Isaac N. 

Trent, 

Republican 


Noah J. 

Paul, 
Democrat 




11,250 


6,063 






Isaac N. Trent (Rep.), majority 5,187. 


County 


Paul D. 

Farley, 
Republican 


Allen R. 

Bemenderfer 

Democrat 


Burtlyn 

Fox, 
Socialist 


Elkhart 


9,196 


7,501 


230 








County 


Floyd V. 

Miller, 

Republican 


Herbert C. 
Waterman, 
Democrat 


John H. 

McKibben, 

Socialist 


Elkhart . 


9,636 


6,947 


f" 242 1 






County , 


Chester V. 

Lorch, 
Republican 


Herbert P. 
Kenney, 
Democrat 


Floyd 


5,730 


6,641 




*J 


Herbert P. Kenney (Dem.), majority 911. 


County 


« 


Earle M. 

Myers, 

Republican 


Byron M. 

Allen, 
Democrat 




4,728 


4,557 







Earle M. Myers, (Rep)., majority 171. 



72 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 
STATE REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



County 


Claude A. 

Smith, 
Republican 


Arthur 
Johnson, 
Democrat 


Charles 
Rough, 
Socialist 




6,717 


6,794 


293 






Arthur Johnson (Dem.), plurality 77. 


County 


Albert E. 

Shugart, 

Republican 


John A. 
Peterson, 
Democrat 


Henry 
Pry, 

Socialist 




8,319 


8,882 


499 






John A. Peterson (Dem.), plurality 563. 


County 


Elmer W. 
Sherwood, 
Republican 


William J. 

Powell, 
Democrat 


Marion E. 
Preutt, 
Socialist 




6,439 


6,893 


750 






William J. Powell, (Dem.), plurality 454. 


County 


Perry 

Johnson, 

Republican 


William E. 

Wilson, 
Democrat 




6,316 


4,081 




Perry Johnson (Rep.), majority 2,235. 


County 


Benjamin F. 

Davis, 
Republican 


J. Russell 
Landreth, 
Democrat 




5,667 


4,175 






Benjamin F. Davis (Rep.), majority 1,492. 


County 


Raymond C. 

Morgan, 
Republican 


Frank A. 
Wisehart, 
Democrat 




6,706 


5,388 




Raymond C. Morgan (Rep.), majority 1,318. 

(i.'£iA--J •-#»>•* »***,*'»« &,#.<*-**&** 


County 


George W. 
Freeman, 
Republican 


Kenton G. 
Albright, 
Democrat 


Polk 
Redman, 
Socialist 




6,180 


5,556 


1,926 







George M W. Freeman (Rep.), plurality k 624. 



Secretary of State 



73 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

STATE REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



County 


John P. 

Shutt, 
Republican 


Harvey Z. 
Collins, 
Democrat 


Isaac 
Swihart, 
Socialist 


Huntington 


6,915 


6,999 


118 






Harvey Z. Collins (Dem.), plurality 84. 


County 


John G. 
Hammitt, 
Republican 


William I. 
Journay, 
Democrat 


Jay 


5,561 


5,500 




John G. Hammitt (Rep.), majority 61. 










Henry F. 

Voile, 
Republican 


Shirley 
Leveron, 
Democrat 


Knox 


7,790 


9,135 






Shirley Leveron (Dem.), majority 1,345. 








County 


Ezra W. 

Graham, 

Republican 


George W. 

Irvine, , 

Democrat 






6,383 


5,417 






Ezra W. Graham (Rep.), majority 976. 




Oscar A. 

Ahlgren, 

Republican 


FredH. 
Detrich, 
Democrat 


Herman W. 

Blankenship, 

Socialist 




15,400 


9,393 


380 








County 


James I. 

Day, 

Republican 


Thomas P. 
Mullinix, 
Democrat 


Albert 
Duncan, 

Socialist 




15,252 


9,314 


393 








County 


J. Glenn 

Harris, 

Republican 


Edw. E. 
Scheidt, 
Democrat 


Olive A. 
Howard, 
Socialist 




15,199 


9,439 


386 







74 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

STATE REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



County 


William M. 

Love, 
Republican 


Ralph 

White, 

Democrat 


Arthur W. 
McColley, 
Socialist 




15,345 


9,527 


383 








County 


John W. 

Thiel, 
Republican 


Will H. 

Wood, 

Democrat 


E. Izora 
Wnitmer, 
Socialist 




15,313 


9,591 


386 








County 


Charles W. 
Isenbarger, 
Republican 


Earle D. 

Brown, 

Democrat 




8,211 


6,858 






Charles W. Isenbarger (Rep.), majority 1,353. 


County 


John C. 
Sherwood, 
Republican 




5,570 






John C. Sherwood, (Rep.), majority 5,570. 


County 


Wallace B. 
Campbell, 
Republican 


Myron H. 

Post, 
Democrat 


Phoebe 
Hoppes, 
Socialist 




13,195 


14,023 


497 






Myron H. Post (Dem.), plurality 828. 


County 


Caleb C. 
Williams, 
Republican 


John F. P. 
Thurston, 
Democrat 




13,222 


14,083 






John F. P. Thurston (Dem.), majority 861. 


County 


Henry L. 

Humrichouser, 

Republican 


John W. 

Kitch, 

Democrat 




4,872 


5,385 











John W. Kitch (Dem.), majority 513. 



Secretary of State 



75 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

STATE REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



COUNTT 


Burton 

Green, 

Republican 


William 

Hart, 

Democrat 




5,537 


7,518 




William Hart (Dem.), majority 1,981. 







County 



Monroe. 



E. William G. 

Johnson, 

Republican 



5,061 



Harry M. 
Kenney, 
Democrat 



4,846 



E. William G. Johnson (Rep.), majority 215. 


County 


Walter 

Remley, 

Republican 


Frank D. 

Nolan, 
Democrat 


Montgomery 


6,994 


7,224 






Frank D. Nolan (Dem.), majority 230. 


County 


David B. 

Johnson, 

Republican 


Jap 

Jones, 

Democrat 




4,251 


4,978 




Jap Jones (Dem.), majority 727. 


County 


Bernard F. 

Haines, 
Republican 


James E. 
Luckey, 
Democrat 


Noble 


4,853 


4,652 






Bernard F. Haines (Rep.), majority 201. 


County 


Winfield 

Catlin, 

Republican 


Willam L. 

Flock, 
Democrat 


Parke 


3,910 


4,750 






William L. Flock (Dem.), majority 840. 


County 


Evert A. 
Addington, 
Republican 


Clarence 
Mullen, 
Democrat 




6,707 


3,455 







Evert A. Addington (Rep.), majority 3,252. 



76 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 
STATE REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



County 


A. N. 
DuComb, 
Republican 


August 

Bailey, 

Democrat 




12,856 


12,544 






County 


Dayton D. 

Mangus, 
Republican 


Thomas H. 
Jackson, 
Democrat 




12,826 


12,922 






County 


Harry C. 
Matthews, 
Republican 


Leo 
Van Hess, 
Democrat 




13,022 


12,659 






County 


Scott 

Meiks, 

Republican 


Clarence A. 

Lowe, 
Democrat 


Shelby 


5,456 


6,576 






Clarence A. Lowe, (Dem.), majority 1,120. 


County 


John D. 

Hill, 

Republican 


Addison 

Drake, 

Democrat 




4,349 


5,939 




Addison Drake, (Dem), majority 1,500. 


County 


Elmer R. 

Waters, 

Republican 


John C. F. 
Redinbo, 
Democrat 




9,889 


7,739 






Elmer R. Waters (Rep.), majority 2,150. 


County 


Henry E. 

Dreier, 
Republican 


Harry M. 
Punshon, 
Democrat 


George G. 
Tilley, 
Socialist 




14,490 


16,646 


481 







HarryiM.iPunshon (Dem.), plurality 2,156. 



Secretary of State 



77 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

STATE REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



County 


Thomas W. 
McCutchaix, 
Republican 


Edward R. 

Peters, 
Democrat 


John B. 
Kullman, 
Socialist 


Vanderburgh 


16,679 


14,806 


446 


Thomas W. McCutchan (Rep.), plurality 1,873. 


County 


Harry E. 
Rowbottom, 
Republican 


E. H. 
Scheips, 
Democrat 


William 
Maa3berg; 
Socialist 




16,433 


14,939 


454 






Harry E. Rowbottom (Rep.), plurality 1,494. 


County 


John A. 

Hughes, 

Republican 


Matthew M. 

Scott, 

Democrat 




3,531 


3,879 






Matthew M. Scott (Dem.), majority 348. 


County 


George S. 

Johnson, 

Republican 


James M. 

Carlos, 
Democrat 


Edward M. 
Boston, 
Socialist 




12,956 


15,284 


847 






James M. Carlos (Dem.), plurality 2,328. 


County 


Frank W. 

Ray. 
Republican 


Edgar D. 

Fagin, 
Democrat 


Edward 

Greenwood, 

Socialist 




12,910 


15,299 


858 








Edgar D. Fagin (Dem.), plurality 2,389. 


County 


George W. 

Sims, 
Republican 


Charles F. 

Riede, 
Democrat 




12,761 


15,542 






Charles F. Riedc (Dem.), majority 2,781. 


County 


George F. 

Ogden, 
Republican 


Chester E. 

Troyer, 

Democrat 




6,284 


5,480 









George F. Ogden. (Rep.), majority 



78 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

STATE REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



County 


James M. 

Knapp, 
Republican 


Thollie W. 

Druley, 

Democrat 




7,873 


6,937 







James M. Knapp (Rep.), majority 936. 



STATE JOINT REPRESENTATIVES 



Counties 


Dewitt 0. 

Wilber, 
Republican 


Ju! ; us G. 
Schwing, 
Democrat 




4,414 
1,166 


4,770 


Ohio 


1,002 








Total 


5,580 


5,772 







Julius G. Schwing (Dem.), majority 192. 



Counties 


Jobn W. 

Johnson, 

Republican 


Madison F. 
Ho man, 
Democrat 


Lin 
Windsor, 
Socialist 




4,560 
2,468 


4,773 
2,664 


48 




20 








Total 


7,028 


7,437 


68 







Madison F. Holman (Dem.), plurality 



Counties 


Charles E. 

Dean, 
Republican 


Clarence T. 

Custer, 

Democrat 




4,729 
1,472 


4,808 


Scott 


1,960 








Total 


6,201 


6,768 







Clarence T. Custer (Dem.), majority 567. 



Counties 


Chester 

Miller, 

Republican 


Sherman 

Hall, 
Democrat 




864 
3,983 


1,350 




5,682 








Total 


4,847 


7,032 







Sherman Hall (Dem.), majority, 2,185. 



Secretary of State 



79 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 
STATE JOINT REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



Counties 



Lewis C. 

Carter, 

Republican 



Will 
Nicholson, 
Democrat 



Orange 

Washington ! . 

Total 

Lewis C. Carter (Rep.), majority 135 



3,413 
3,926 



7,474 



7,339 



Counties 



Straude E. 
Wiseman, 
Republican 



G. Remy 

Bierly, 
Democrat 



Crawford , 

Harrison 

Total... 

G. Remy Bierly (Dem.), majority 541 



2,180 
4,120 



2,553 
4,288 



6,841 



Counties 


Walter L. 

Jay, 
Republican 


George L. 
Hoffman, 
Democrat 


James W. 
Summer, 
Socialist 




2,505 
2,686 


4,699 
2,681 


66 




24 








Total 


5,191 


7,380 


90 







George L. Hoffman (Dem.), plurality 2, 



Counties 



Perry. 



Total. 



Albert J. 
Wedeking, 
Republican 



3,307 

4,729 



,036 



John P. 
Chrisney, 
Democrat 



3,799 
4,180 



7,979 



Albert J. Wedeking (Rep.), majority 57. 



Counties 



W. B. 
Anderson, 
Republican 



_ Edgar 
Livingston 
Democrat 



Knox 

Pike 

Total 

Edgar Livingston (Dem.), majority 1 



7,541 
3,321 



9,144 
3,716 



10, 



80 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 
STATE JOINT REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



Counties 


Thomas B. 

Brown, 
Republican 


Frederick H. 
Martin, 
Democrat 


William F. 
Walther, 
Socialist 




3,868 
16,557 
4,213 


4,498 
14,810 
4,541 


30 




455 




61 






Total 


24,638 


23,849 


546 







Counties 


Lonzo L. 

Shull, 
Republican 


Thomas E. 
Wooldridge, 
Democrat 


William H. 
Hedrick, 
Socialist 




6,040 
3,807 


5,617 
3,831 


1,734 


Tipton 


50 






Total 


9,847 


9,448 


1,784 







Lonzo L. Shull (Rep.), plurality 399. 



Counties 


Harry G. 

Leslie, 
Republican 


Harry 

Eads, 

Democrat 




10, 128 
2,387 


7,504 




1,212 








Total 


12,515 


8,716 







Harry G. Leslie (Rep.), majority 3,799. 



Counties 


Elwood 

Morris, 

Republican 


William H. 
Larrabee, 
Democrat 




3,537 
13,357 


4,661 




13,913 








Total 


16,894 


18,574 







William H. Larrabee (Dem.), majority 1, 



Counties 


Oliver P. 

La fuze, 

Republican 


George M. 

Young, 

Democrat 




1,904 
8,941 


1,291 




5,830 








Total 


10,845 


7,121 







Oliver P. Lafuze (Rep.), majority 3,724. 



Secretary op State 



81 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 
STATE JOINT REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



Counties 


Charles M. 
Trowbridge, 
Republican 


Strode 

Hays, 

Democrat 




5,683 
5,236 


6,394 
4,122 










Total 


10,919 


10,516 





Charles M. Trowbridge (Rep.), majority 403. 



Counties 


William R. 

Phillips, 
Republican 


William F. 

Flack, 
Democrat 


Fayette .' 


4,401 
3,357 


3,010 


Franklin 


4,033 








Total 


7,758 


7,043 





William R. Phillips (Rep.), majority 715. 



Counties 


Frank E. 

Cline, 
Republican 


Harry W. 
Bassett, 
Democrat 


Lee 

Geisendorff, 

Socialist 




4,689 
49,505 


5,194 
41,787 






1,242 






Total 


54, 194 


46,981 


1,242 







Frank E. Cline (Rep.), plurality 7,213. 





Counties 


flohn E. 
Harrison, 
Republican 


Willis E. 

Gill, 
Democrat 




2,859 
4,464 


3,141 




5,447 








TotaL 


7,323 


8,588 







Willis E. Gill (Dem.), majority 1,265. 



Counties 


William C. 

Pulse, 
Republican 


John G. 

Klein, 

Democrat 




5,094 
3,078 


3,986 




3,143 








Total 


8,172 


7,129 







William C. Pulse (Rep.), majority 1,043. 



6—22978 



82 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 
STATE JOINT REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



Counties 


William A. 

Hill, 
Republican 


John P. 
Kimmell, 
Democrat 


Ray S. 
Berlin, 
Socialist 




15,356 
3,944 


9,414 
1,919 


377 




121 








Total 


19,300 


11,333 


498 









William A. Hill (Rep.), plurality 7,967. 



!■.:.. 

i Counties 


Isaac 
Harvey Hull, 
Republican 


Lemuel 
Darrow, 
Democrat 




7,691 
2,364 


7,360 




1,983 








Total 


10,055 


9,343 





Isaac Harvey Hull (Rep.), majority 712. 



•Counties 


M. C. 

Murray, 

Republican 


Otis L. 

Ballou, 

Democrat 




3,000 
3,744 


1,999 




1,667 








Total 


6,744 


3,666 





M. C. Murray (Rep.), majority 3,078. 



Counties 


Eph P. 

Dailey, 

Republican 


James D. 

Butt, 
Democrat 


Allen 




13.398 
3,930 


17,161 


Whitley. . . - 


4,141 








Total 


17,328 


21,302 







James D. Butt (Dem.). majority 3,974. 



Counties 


Harris E. 

Butler, 
Republican 


Lee E. 

Shafer. 

Democrat 


Fulton 


3,749 
2,425 


3,971 




2,781 








Total 


6,174 


6,752 







Lee E. Shafer (Dem.), majority 578. 



Secretary of State 



83 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

STATE JOINT REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



Counties 


Jacob D. 

Rich, 
Republican 


Ellis 

Jones, 

Democrat 




3,327 
2,523 


2,461 




1,929 








Total. 


5,850 


4,390 







Jacob D. Rich (Rep.), majority 1,460. 



Counties 


Harry 
Kretschman, 
Republican 


Charles H. 
Dodson, 
Democrat 




3,177 
4,120 


2,300 


White 


3,834 






Total 


7,297 


6,134 





Harry Kretschman (Rep.), majority 1,163. 



Counties 


William R. 

Lytle, 
Republican 


Charleo V. 
McCloskey, 
Democrat 


Carroll 


4,489 
7,941 


4,092 
8,57$ 






Total 


12,430 


12,667 





Charles V. McCloskey, (Dem.), majority 237. 



Counties 


Earl B. 

Adams, 

Republican 


Thurman A. 
Gottschalk, 
Democrat 




2,529 
3,275 


4,438 
4,376 


Wells 






Total 


5,804 


8,814 





Thurman A. Gottschalk (Dem.), majority 3,010. 



Counties 


Wayne S. 

Tucker, 

Republican 


Clifford 
Townsend, 
Democrat 


Benjamin F. 
Brower, 
Socialist 




2,674 
8,209 


3,099 
8,747 


75 




500 






Total 


10,883 


11,846 


575 







Clifford Townsend (Dem.), plurality 963. 



84 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

JUDGES OF THE CIRCUIT COURT 

Second Circuit 



County 


Union W. 
Youngblood, 
Republican 


Caleb J. 
Lindsey, 
Democrat 




4,425 


4,570 







Caleb J. Lindsey (Dem.), majority 145. 



Ninth Circuit 



County 


John W. 
Donaker, 
Republican 


Carl J. 
Kollmeyer, 
Democrat 


Victor M. 

Carr, 
Socialist 




6,581 


5,016 


62 







John W. Donaker (Rep.), plurality 1,565. 



Sixteenth Circuit 



County 


Elmer 

Bassett, 

Republican 


Harry C. 
Morrison, 
Democrat 


Shelby. 


5,048 


7,220 







Harry C. Morrison (Dem.), majority 2,172. 

Thirty-Second Circuit 



County 


John C. 

Richter, 

Republican 


W. H. 
Warden, 
Democrat 




7,851 


7,518 







John C. Richter (Rep.), majority 333. 



Thirty-Fourth Circuit 



Counties 


James S. 

Drake, 

Republican 


Elkhart 


10,363 




3,409 








Total 


13,772 







James S. Drake (Rep.), majority 13,772. 



Secretary of State 



85 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

JUDGES OF THE CIRCUIT COURT— Continued 

Thirty-Fifth Circuit 



Counties 


William P. 
Endicott, 
Republican 


Walter D. 

Stump, 
Democrat 


Dekalb 


5, 104 
3,831 


5,743 




1,669 






Total 


8,935 


7,412 





William P. Endicott (Rep.), majority 1,523. 

Thirty-Seventh Circuit 



Counties 


Cecil C. 

Tague, 

Republican 


Albert J. 

Peine, 
Democrat 




3,873 
2,125 


3,861 




1,086 






Total 


5,998 


4,947 







Cecil C. Tague (Rep.), majority 1,051. 

Forty-Sixth Circuit 



Counties 


Clarence W. 

Dearth, 
Republican 


AdolphC. 
Silverburg, 
Democrat 




11,725 


6,603 







Clarence W. Dearth (Rep.), majority 5,122. 

Forty-Seventh Circuit 



Counties 


Everett A. 
Davisson, 
Republican t 


William C. 

Wait, 
Democrat 


Joseph 
Wright, 
Socialist 




3,367 


4,206 


285 







William C. Wait (Dem.), plurality 839. 

Forty-Eighth Circuit 



County 


J. Frank 

Charles, 

Republican 


Wilber E. 
Williams, 
Democrat 


Grant 


9,572 


7,984 







J. Frank Charles Rep.), majority 1,£ 



86 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

JUDGES OF THE CIRCUIT COURT— Continued 

Forty-Ninth Circuit 



Counties 


Milton S. 
Hastings, 
Republican 


Alvin 
Padgett, 
Democrat 




6,476 
2,659 


5,963 




2,718 






Total 


9,135 


8,681 






Milton S. Hastings (Rep.), majority 454. 

Fifty-Eighth Circuit 


Counties 


Roscoe D. 

Wheat, 
Republican 


Frank 
Gillespie, 
Democrat 




5,647 


5,536 







Roscoe D. Wheat (Rep.), majority 111. 



Sixty-Second Circuit 



County 


William C. 
Overton, 

Republican 


John 
Marshall, 
Democrat 


William L. 
McGaw, 
Socialist 




4,642 


7,792 


1,572 







John Marshall (Dem.), plurality 3,150. 



Sixty-Eighth Circuit 



County 


Howard L. 
Hancock, 
Republican 


Roy 

Baker, 

Democrat 


Parke 


3,989 


4,703 







Roy Baker (Dem.), majority 714. 



SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES 



County 


Edgar 

Durre, 

Republican 


Lane B. 
Osborn, 
Democrat 


* 
Socialist 




15,918 


15,596 


241 







Edgar Durre (Rep.), plurality, 322. 
•No candidate. 



Secretary of State 



87 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES— Continued 



County 


William N. 

Ballou, 
Republican 


Charles J. 

Ryan, 
Democrat 


Allen 


14,250 


16,427 







Charles J. Ryan (Dem.). majority, 2,177. 



County 


William B. 

Hile, 
Republican 


Clarendon C. 
Raymer, 
Democrat - 


Elkhart 


9,335 


7,510 







William B. Hill (Rep.), majority, 1,825. 



County 



Robert F. 

Murray, 

Republican 



William C. 
Coryell, 
Democrat 



Delaware. 
Grant . . . 



Total. 



12,592 
9,240 



21,832 



5,629 
7.852 



13.481 



Robert F. Murray (Rep.), majority, 8,351. 


County 


Virgil S. 

Reiter, 

Republican 


JohnD. 
Kennedy, 
Democrat 


William 
Mallett, 
Socialist 


Lake, Room 1 


15,504 


9,296 


379 






Virgil S. Reiter (Rep.), plurality, 6,308. 








County 


Maurice E. 

Crites, 
Republican 


Forest A. 
Nicholas, 
Socialist 


Lake, Room 2 


15,568 


402 






Maurice Edward Crites (Rep.), majority, 15,166. 


County 


Charles E. 
Greenwald, 
Republican 


Emmet N. 

White, 
Democrat 


Roy A. 
Roberts, 
Socialist 


Lake Room 3 


15,043 


9,691 


392 






Charles E. Greenwald (Rep.), plurality, 5,352. 


County 


James M. 
Leathers, 
Republican 


Salem D. 

Clark, 
Democrat 


Frank J. 
McCool, 
Socialist 




47,518 


44,353 


1,154 







James M. Leathers (Rep.), plurality, 3,165. 



88 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES— Continued 



County 


Linn D. 

Hay, 

Republican 


Smiley N. 
Chambers, 
Democrat 


John J. 
Nunes, 
Socialist 




47,708 


44,250 


1,135 









Linn D. Hay (Rep.), plurality, 3,458. 



County 


Sidney S. 

Miller, 
Republican 


Edward W. 

Little, 
Democrat 


Robert H. 
Jackman, 
Socialist 




47,726 


44,273 


1,168 







Sidney S. Miller (Rep.), plurality, 3,453. 



County 


Clinton H. 

Givan, 
Republican 


Clarence E. 

Wier, 
Democrat 


Edward 
Longerich, 
Socialist 




47,304 


44,760 


1,149 







Clinton H. Givan (Rep.), plurality, 2,544. 



County 


Theophilos J 

Moll, 
Republican 


Gideon W. 

Blain, 
Democrat 


Richard H., 

Fletemeyer 

Socialist 




47,366 


44,650 


1,151 







Theophilus J. Moll (Rep.), plurality, 2,716. 



County 


Francis A. 

Walker, 
Republican 


Willis S. 

Ellis, 
Democrat 


JohnG. 

Lewis, 
Socialist 




12,251 


14,950 


527 







Willis S. Ellis (Dem.), plurality, 2, 





County 


Harry L. 
Crumpacker, 
Republican 






9,504 
4,261 


5,922 


Porter 


1,796 








Total.. 


13,765 


7,718 







Harry L. Crumpacker (Rep.), majority, 6,047. 



County 


Alfred E. 

Martin, 

Republican 


J. Fred 
Bingham, 
Democrat 




12,235 


13,418 







J. Fred Bingham (Dem.), majority, 1,183. 



Secretary op State 



89 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 
SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES— Continued 



County 


Lenn J. 

Oare. 

Republican 


Antony A. 
Wolfe, 
Democrat 


St. Joseph, Room 2 


13,407 


12,216 




Lenn J. Oare (Rep.), majority, 1,191. 


County 


Henry H. 

Vinton, 

Republican 


Tippecanoe 


10 052 






Henry H. Vinton (Rep.), majority, 10,052. 


County 


Chester Y. 

Kelly, 
Republican 


John E. 

Cox, 
Democrat 


Isaac 

Hall, 

Socialist 




13,412 


15,378 


808 







John E. Cox (Dem.), plurality, 



PROBATE COURT JUDGE 



County 


Mahlon E. 

Bash, 
Republican 


Harold K. 
Bachelder, 
Democrat 


Turner T. 
Marshall, 
Socialist 




48,311 


43,257 


1,145 







Mahlon E. Bash (Rep.), plurality, 5,054. 



CRIMINAL COURT JUDGE 



County 


James A. 

Collins, 

Republican 


James D. 
Ermston, 
Democrat 


John 

Gassoway, 

Socialist 




48,259 


43,677 


1,144 







James A. Collins (Rep.), plurality, 4,582. 



JUVENILE COURT JUDGE 



County 


Frank J. 

Lahr, 

Republican 


Jacob L. 
Steinmetz, 
Democrat 


Susan 

Thompson, 

Socialist 




48,215 


43,570 


1,139 







Frank J. Lahr (Rep.) , plurality ,[4 , 645. 



90 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS 
First Circuit 



Sam P. Vogt (Rep.), majority, 1,811. 



Fourth Circuit 



COUNTT 


Charles F. 

Werner, 

Republican 


Henry T. 
Hardin, 
Democrat 


Arthur 

Senta, 

Socialist 




14,362 


16,785 


469 






Henry T. Hardin (Dem.), plurality, 2,423. 

Second Circuit 


County 


Henry A. 

Bippus, 

Republican 


O NO 






4,523 


4,369 




Henry A. Bippus (Rep.), majority, 154. 

Third Circuit 


Counties 


Phillip S. 

Seacat, 

Republican 


Sam P. 

Vogt, 

Democrat 




2,131 

4,097 


2,663 




4,376 








Total 


6,228 


8,039 







County 



James L. 
Bottorff, 
Democrat 



Clark. 



,188 



James L. Bottorff (Dem.), majority, 6,188. 



Fifth Circuit 



Counties 


George B. 

Hall, 
Republican 


Harvey J. 
Zearing, 
Democrat 




4,624 
2,412 


4,876 




2,699 








Total 


7,036 


7,575 







Harvey J. Zearing (Dem.), majority, 539. 



Secretary of State 



91 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS— Continued 
Sixth Circuit 



Counties 



Blucher M. 

Owens, 
Republican 



William M. 

Turner, 

Democrat 



Jennings 

Ripley 

Scott 

Total 

William M. Turner (Dem.) majority, 155. 

Seventh Circuit 



3,143 
4,642 
1,629 



9,414 



3,033 
4,718 
1,818 



,569 



Counties 



Crawford A. 

Peters, 
Republican 



Thomas A. 
Cooper, 
Democrat 



Dearborn 

Ohio x 

Total 

Thomas A. Cooper (Dem.), majority, 1,140. 

Eighth Circuit 



4,219 
957 



5,176 



5,064 
1.252 



6,316 



Counties 



Hugh E. 
Vandiver, 
Republican 



John P. 
Wright, 
Democrat 



Brown 

Johnson 

Total 

John P. Wright (Dem.), majority, 1,367. 

Ninth Circuit 



873 
4,534 



5,407 



1,388 
5,386 



6,774 



County 



Archibald T. 

Conner, 
Republican 



John E. 
Summa, 
Democrat 



George H. 
Percifield, 
Socialist 



Bartholomew . 



55 



John E. Summa (Dem.), plurality, 183. 



Tenth Circuit 



Counties 


Glen B. 
Woodward, 
Republican 


Frank J. 

Dunn, 

Democrat 




5,110 

2,878 


4,869 




3,096 








Total 


7,988 


7,965 







Glen B. Woodward (Rep.), majority, 23. 



92 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS— Continued 
Eleventh Circuit 



County 



Counties 


James S. 

Kilroy, 

Democrat 




4,936 






James S. Kilroy (Dem.), majority, 4,936. 

Twelfth Circuit 


Counties 


John Rabb 

Emison, 

Republican 


Floyd L. 

Young, 

Democrat 


James H. 
Murphy, 
Socialist 


Knox 


7,680 


9,978 


520 






Floyd L. Young (Dem.\ plurality, 2,298. 

Thirteenth Circuit 


Counties 


Henry A. 
McShanog, 
Republican 


RoyV. 

Tozer, 

Democrat 


Clay. 


4,822 


6,121 






Roy V. Tozer (Dem.), majority, 1,299. 

Fourteenth Circuit 


Counties 


BurlO. 

Buckley, 

Republican 


Norval K. 

Harris, 

Democrat 




4,796 


5,906 






Norval K. Harris (Dem.), majority, 1,110. 

Fifteenth Circuit 


County 


Orval W. 

Smith, 

Republican 


Fred W. 

Steiger, 

Democrat 




4,506 


4,692 




Fred W. Steiger (Dem.), majority, 186. 

Sixteenth Circuit 



Shelby. 



AraE. 

Lisher, 

Republican 



5,026 



Arthur L. 
McLane, 
Democrat 



6,989 



Arthur L. McLane (Dem.), majority, 1,963. 



Secretary of State 



93 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS-Continued 

Seventeenth Cibcuit 



County 


Frank T. 

Strayer, 

Republican 


James F. 

Pace, 
Democrat 




8,994 


5,974 







Frank T. Strayer (Rep.)i majority, 3, 



Eighteenth CiECtrrr 



County 


George F. 
Dickman, 


Waldo C. 

Ging, 




3,694 


4,592 







Waldo C. Ging (Dem.), majority, 898. 



Nineteenth Circuit 



County 


William P. 

Evans, 
Republican 


Richard M. 
Coleman, 
Democrat 


William 0. 
Fogleson, 
Socialist 




47,989 


43,986 


1,144 







William P. Evans (Rep.), plurality, 4,001. 



Twentieth Circuit 



County 


Guy M. Ruel H. 

Voris, Cain, 

Republican Democrat 


Boone 


5,791 


6,546 







Ruel H. Cain (Dem.), majority, 755. 



Twenty-First Ciecuit 





Counties 


Wilbur G. 
Nolin, 
Republican 


Benton 


3,381 


Warren 


2,401 








Total 


5,782 







Wilbur G. Nolin (Rep.), majority, 5,782. 



94 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 
PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS— Continued 
Twenty-Second Circuit 



County 


Harry D. 

Michael, 

Republican 


Thomas E. 
O'Connor, 
Democrat 


Montgomery 


7,841 


6,338 






Harry D. Michael (Rep.), majority, 1,503. 

Twenty-Third Circuit 


County 


Mark L. 
Thompson, 
Republican 


Francis J. 
Murphy, 
Democrat 




9,983 


7,636 






Mark L. Thompson (Rep.), majority, 2,347. 

Twenty-Fourth Circuit 


County 


Ralph H. 

Waltz, 
Republican 


George W. 
Osborn, 
Democrat 




6,292 


4,134 






Ralph H. Waltz (Rep.), majority, 2,158. 

Twenty-Fifth Circuit 






County 


Ernest M. 

Dunn, 
Republican 


Bert E. 
Woodbury, 
Democrat 




6,466 


3,752 






Ernest M. Dunn (Rep.), majority, 2,714. 

Twenty-Sixth Circuit 


County 


Wade L. 

Manley, 

Republican 


E.Burt 
Lenhart, 
Democrat 




2,940 


4,064 






E. Burt Lenhart (Dem.), majority, 1 , 124. 

Twenty-Seventh Circuit 


County 


Howard E. 
Plummer, 
Republican 




6,930 







Howard E. Plummer (Rep.), majority, 6,930. 



Secretary op State 



95 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS— Continued 
Twenty-Eighth Circuit 



Don Douglass (Rep.), majority, 1,762. 



Thirtieth Circuit 



Counties 


Victor H. 
Simmons, 
Republican 


William A. 

Burns, 
Democrat 




3,204 
3.642 


2,664 


Wells 


4,136 










Total 


fi.84fi 


6,800 








Victor H. Simmons (Rep.), majority, 46. 

TWENTT-NINTH CIRCUIT 


County 


Don 

Douglass, 
Republican 


Robert J. 
Arthur, 
Democrat 


Cass 


9,338 


7,576 









Counties 


James C 
Murphey, 
Republican 




3,540 




2,627 








Total 


6,167 







James C. Murphey (Rep.), majority, 6,167. 

ThIrty-First Circuit 



County 


Dwight M. 

Kinder, 
Republican 


Ervin S. 
Whitmer, 
Democrat 




15,359 


4,498 







Dwight Monroe Kinder (Rep.), majority, 10,910. 

Thirty-Second Circuit 



County 


John B. 
Dilworth. 
Republican 


Paul A. 
Krueger, 
Democrat 




7,940 


7,354 





John B. Dilworth (Rep.), majority 586. 



96 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 
PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS— Continued 
Thirty-Third Circuit 



Counties 


George 0. 
Compton, 
Republican 


Robin Adair 

Strong, 

Democrat 


Noble 


5,162 
3,989 


4,239 
4,085 


Whitley 




Total 


9,151 


8,324 




George 0. Compton (Rep.), majority 827. 

Thirty-Fourth Circuit 


Counties 


Glen R. 

Sawyer, 

Republican 


Roy 

Sargent, 
Democrat 


Elkhart 


9,210 
3,130 


7,712 




1,852 






Total 


12,340 


9,564 




Glen R. Sawyer (Rep.), majority 2,776. 

Thirty-Fifth Circuit 


Counties 


Henry C. 

Springer, 

Republican 


Dekalb 


5,744 




3,858 








Total 


9,602 







Henry C. Springer (Rep.), majority 9,602. 

Thirty-Sixth Circuit 



County 



Alfred A. 
Fletcher, 
Republican 



Calvin 
Albright, 
Socialist 



Tipton. 



3,720 



553 



Alfred A. Fletcher (Rep.), majority 3,167. 

Thirty-Seventh Circuit 



Counties 


Elmer F. 
Bossert, 
Republican 


Clifford W. 
Hoffman, 
Democrat 




3,532 
1,908 


3,941 




1,293 








Total 


5,440 


5,234 







Elmer F. Bossert (Rep.), majority 206. 



Secretary of State 



97 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS— Continued 

Thirty-Eighth Circuit 



County 


Louis F. 
Crosby, 

Republican 


Samuel D. 

Jackson, 

Democrat 


Allen 


13,883 


16,806 





Samuel D. Jackson (Dem.), majority 2,923. 

Thirty-Ninth Circuit 



Counties 


Glen R. 

Slenker, 

Republican 


John A. 
Rothrock, 
Democrat 


Carroll 


4,486 
3,994 


4,054 


White 


4,106 






Total 


8,480 


8 260 






Glen R. Slenker (Rep.), majority 220. 

Fortieth Circuit 


Counties 


Simpson B. 

Lowe, 
Republican 


Merlin C. 

Roach, 
Democrat 




5,074 
4,012 


5,349 




5,616 






Total 


9,086 


10 965 






Merlin C. Roach (Dem.), majority 1879. 

Forty-First Circuit 


Counties 


Alvin F. 

Marsh, 

Republican 


Charles G. 

Irvine, 
Democrat 


Fulton 


3,867 
5,393 


3,856 




5,037 






Total , 


9,260 


8,893 




Alvin F. Marsh (Rep.), majority 367. 

Forty-Second Circuit 


Counties 


Henry L. 

Heil, 
Republican 


Thomas P. 
Masterson, 
Democrat 




4,024 
3,180 


3,561 




4,275 






Total . . 


7,204 


7,836 







Thomas P. Masterson (Dem.), majority 632. 
7—22978 



98 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS-Continued 

Forty-Third Circuit 



County 



Noble J. 

Johnson, 

Republican 



Duff 
Caldwell, 
Democrat 



Orville E. 
Barker, 

Socialist 



Vigo. 



15,053 



13,911 



765 



Noble J. Johnson (Rep.), plurality 1,142. 



Forty-Fourth Circuit 



Counties 



Jay M. 

Nye, 

Republican 



George 

Dellinger, Jr., 

Democrat 



Pulaski 

Starke 

Total. 



2,475 
2,289 



4,764 



2,853 
2,094 



4,947 



George Dellinger, Jr., (Dem.), majority 183. 

Forty-Fifth Circuit 


County 


Ernest W. 
Thompson, 
Republican 


Paul E. 
Laymon, 
Democrat 




6,569 


7,021 






Paul E. Laymon (Dem.), majority 452. 

Forty-Sixth Circuit 


County 


VanL. 

Ogle, 

Republican 


Obed. 
Kilgore, 
Democrat 




11,385 


6,409 






Van L. Ogle (Rep.), majority 4,976. 

Forty-Seventh Circuit 


County 


Robert E. 

Guinn, 
Republican 


Willis A. 
Satterlee, 
Democrat 


FredE. 
Coleman, 
Socialist 




3,472 


3,888 


289 






Willis A. Satterlee (Dem.), plurality 416. 

Forty-Eighth Circuit 


County 


A.Jay 

Keever, 

Republican 


J. Walter 
McClellan, 
Democrat 


Wilbur 
Sheron, 
Socialist 




8,533 


8,469 


511 







A. Jay Keever (Rep.), Plurality, 64. 



Secretary of State 



99 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS— Continued 
Forty-Ninth Circuit 



Counties 


J. Earle 
Thompson, 
Republican 


John H. 
Spencer, 
Democrat 




6,342 
2,659 


5,810 
2,711 








Total 


9,001 


8,521 





J. Earle Thompson (Rep.) Majority, 480. 



Fiftieth Circuit 



COUNTT 


Arthur A. 
Beckman, 
Republican 


Charles E. 

Smith, 
Democrat 


Clarence L. 
Dawson, 
Socialist 




13,496 


13,746 


514 







Charles E. Smith (Dem.) Plurality, 250. 



Fifty-First Circuit 



County 


Hugh P. 
Lawrence, 
Republican 


Rodney H. 
Bayless, 
Democrat 




6,823 


6 300 







Hugh P. Lawrence (Rep.) Majority, 523. 



Fifty-Second Circuit 



County 


Charles R. 
McBride, 
Republican 


Charles R. 

Turner, 

Democrat 


Floyd 


5,349 


7,104 





Charles R. Turner (Dem.) Majority, 1,755. 

Fifty-Third Circuit 



County 


George R. 

Jeffery, 
Republican 


William J. 

Kelly, 
Democrat 




7,542 


4,418 







George R. Jeffery (Rep.) Majority, 3,124. 

Fifty-Fourth Circuit 



County 


Morrison A. 
Rockhill, 
Republican 


George L. 
Xanders, 
Democrat 




6,864 


4,955 







Morrison A. Rockhill (Rep.) Majority, 1, 



100 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS-Continued 

Fifty-Fifth Circuit 



County 


John T. 

Hume, 

Republican 


Archie J. 

Kah!, 

Democrat 




5,553 


4,272 






John T. Hume (Rep.) Majority, 1,281. 

Fifty-Sixth Circuit 



County 



Huntington . 



Knowlton H. 

Kelsey, 
Republican 



Burdge H. 

Hurd, 
Democrat 



,461 7,530 



Edward G. 

Nix, 
Socialist 



125 



Burdge H. Hurd (Dem.) Plurality, 1, 



Fifty-Seventh Circuit 





Counties 


Carl M. 

Gray, 

Democrat 




4,859 


Pike .... 


3,813 








Total 


8,672 







Carl M. Gray (Dem.) Majority, 8,672. 



Fifty-Eighth Circuit 



County 


Austin H. 
Williamson, 
Republican 


Guy 

Bryan, 

Democrat 




5,734 


5,298 







Austin H. Williamson (Rep.) Majority, 436. 



Sixtieth Circuit 



County 


Frank E. 
Coughlin, 
Republican 


M. Edward 

Doran, 
Democrat 




12,817 


12,782 







Frank E. Coughlin (Rep.) Majority, 35. 



Sixty-First Circuit 



County 



Fountain . 



John P. 

Brissey, 

Republican 



4,687 



John P. Brissey (Rep.) Majority, 4,687. 



Secretary of State 



101 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS— Continued 

Sixty-Second Circuit 



County 


Forest A. 

Harness, 

Republican 


William W. 
Watkins, 
Democrat 




6,422 


3,863 






Forest A. Harness (Rep.) Majority, 2,559. 

Sixty-Third Circuit 


County 


Alfred M. 

Beasley, 

Republican 


George G. 

Humphreys, 

Democrat 




5,982 


7,560 






George G. Humphreys (Dem.) Majority, 1,578. 

Sixty-Fourth Circuit 


County 


Frank 

Stoessel, 

Republican 


Glenn H. 

Lyon, 
Democrat 




4,731 


5,207 






Glenn H. Lyon (Dem.) Majority, 476. 

Sixty-Fifth Circuit 


County 


John F. 
Joyce, 


Gates 
Ketchum, 


Rush 


4,338 


5,214 






Gates Ketchum (Dem.) Majority, 876. 

Sixty-Sixth Circuit 


County 


. James J. 
Robinson, 
Republican 


George L. 
Bridenhager, 
Democrat 


H. B. 
White, 
Socialist 




6,729 


6,806 


297 






George L. Bridenhager (Dem.) Plurality, 77. 

Sixty-Seventh Circuit 


County 


Field Ray 

Marine, 

Republican 




4,186 







Field Ray Marine (Rep.) Majority, 4,186. 



102 



Year Book 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE— Continued 

PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS— Continued 

Sixty-Eighth Circuit 



County 


Earl M. 

Dowd, 

Republican 


Hugh H. 

Banta, 

Democrat 


Park 


4,100 


4,341 







Hugh H. Banta (Dem.) Majority, 241. 



Sixty-Ninth Circuit 



County 



John W. 
Holcomb, 
Republican 



Decatur . 



5,001 



John W. Holcomb (Rep.) Majority, 5,001. 



Seventieth Circuit 





Counties 


Edmund S. 

Lincoln, 
Republican 


Daniel C. 

Goble, 
Democrat 






3,334 
4,389 


3,931 




4,534 








Total 


7,723 


8,465 







Daniel C. Goble (Dem.) Majority, 742. 



Seventy-Third Circuit 



County 



Fayette. 



William E. 

Sparks, 
Republican 



4,265 



Leroy C. 
Hanby, 
Democrat 



3,214 



William E. Sparks (Rep.) Majority, 1,051. 



REPORT OF AUDITOR OF STATE 



OFFICERS AND EMPLOYES 

WILLIAM G. OLIVER, Auditor of State. 
EDWARD A. REMY, Deputy Auditor. 
L. C. JOHNSON, Audit Clerk. 
GREENBERRY G. LOWE, Settlement Clerk. 
LELA A. YOUNG, Stenographer and Clerk. 
C. CLAUDE ROSENBARGER, Land Clerk. 

DUTIES OF THE AUDITOR OF STATE 

Section 151 of the Constitution of Indiana provides that there shall 
be elected by the voters of the State an auditor who shall hold his office 
for two years. He shall perform such duties as may be enjoined by 
law; and no person shall be eligible to serve as auditor more than four 
years in any period of six years. 

The Auditor of State has numerous duties and responsibilities aside 
from the work of the Auditing Department. He is ex-officio Land Com- 
missioner, a member of the State Board of Finance, the State Charter 
Board, the State Board of Accounts, the Board of Public Buildings and 
Grounds, the Board of Public Printing, and the Board of Appointment, 
which board appoints the members of the State Board of Health. 

The Auditor of State is required to keep and state all accounts be- 
tween the State of Indiana and the United States, or any State or 
Territory, or any individual or public officer of this State indebted to 
the State, or intrusted with the collection, disbursement or management 
of any moneys, funds or interest arising therefrom, belonging to the 
State, of every character and description whatsoever, when the same 
are derivable from or payable into the State Treasury. 

Examine and liquidate the accounts of all county treasurers and 
other collectors and receivers of all state revenues, taxes, tolls and in- 
comes, levied or collected by any act of the General Assembly, and 
payable into the State Treasury, and certify the amount or balance to 
the Treasurer of State. 

Keep fair, clear, distinct and separate accounts of all the revenues 
and incomes of the State; and also of all expenditures, disbursements 
and investments thereof, showing the particulars of every expenditure, 
disbursement and investment. 

Examine, adjust and settle the accounts of all public debtors, for 
debts due the State Treasury, and require all such persons, or their 
legal representatives, who may be indebted to the State for moneys 
received or otherwise, and who shall not have accounted therefor, to 
settle their accounts. 

Examine and liquidate the claims of all persons against the State, 
in cases where provisions for the payment thereof shall have been made 

(103) 



104 Year Book 

by law; and when no such provisions, or an insufficient one, has been 
made, to examine the claim, and report the facts, with his opinion 
thereon, to the legislature; and no allowance shall be made to refund 
moneys from the treasury without his statement either for or against 
the justice of the claim. 

Institute and prosecute, in the name of the State, all proper suits 
for the recovery of any debts, moneys or property of the State, or for 
the ascertainment of any right or liability concerning the same. 

Direct and superintend the collection of all moneys due the State, 
and employ counsel to prosecute suits, instituted at his instance, on 
behalf of the State. 

Draw warrants on the treasurer for all moneys directed by law to 
be paid out of the treasury to public officers, or for any other object 
whatsoever, as the same may become payable, and every warrant shall 
be properly numbered. 

Furnish to the Governor, on his requisition, information in writing 
upon any subject relating to the duties of the office of auditor. 

Superintend the fiscal concerns of the State and their management 
in the manner required by law, and furnish the proper forms to as- 
sessors, treasurers, collectors and auditors of counties. 

Keep and preserve all public books, records, papers, documents, 
vouchers, and all conveyances, leases, mortgages, bonds, and all securi- 
ties for debts, moneys or property, and accounts and property, of any 
description, belonging or appertaining to his office and also to the State, 
where no other provision is made by law for the safe-keeping of the 
same. 

Suggest plans for the improvement and management of the public 
revenues, funds and incomes. 

Report and exhibit to the General Assembly, at its biennial meeting, 
a complete statement of the revenues, taxables, funds, resources, in- 
comes and property of the State, known to his office, and of the public 
revenues and expenditures of the two preceding fiscal years, with a de- 
tailed estimate of the expenditures to be defrayed from the treasury 
for the ensuing two years, specifying therein each object of expenditure, 
and distinguishing between each object of expenditure and between such 
as are provided for by permanent or temporary appropriations, and 
such as require to be provided for by law, and showing also the sources 
and means from which all such expenditures are to be defrayed. 

AUDITING DEPARTMENT 



STATEMENT OF BALANCES, RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

A detailed statement of the work of the Auditing Department of 
the office of the Auditor of State for the fiscal year ending September 
30, 1922, giving a condensed exhibit of the balances in the state treas- 
ury, by funds, at the beginning of the fiscal year, October 1, 1921 ; also 
the amounts received and disbursed from the several funds during the 
year and the balance on hand at the close of business September 30, 
1922. 



Auditor of State 105 

BALANCE BY FUNDS OCTOBER 1, 1921 

General Fund $168,603 94 

Educational institutions 307,833 71 

Vocational education 57,748 71 

State Debt Sinking Fund 340,000 00 

Common School Fund Principal 10,657 99 

Sale of state lands 11,446 47 

Unclaimed estates 47,225 09 

School revenue for tuition 227,447 45 

Fire Marshal 70,724 07 

Hydrophobia Fund 16,284 85 

Highway Commission Fund 1,293,434 18 

Soldiers' War Memorial Fund 180,425 20 

Auto Theft Fund 257,659 25 

Balance on hand September 30, 1921 $2,989,490 91 

RECEIPTS BY FUNDS FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1922 

General Fund $11,804,475 32 

Benevolent Institution Fund 3,395,745 31 

Educational Institution Fund 2,233,475 18 

Vocational Educational Fund 337,944 33 

Unclaimed estates 489 56 

Common School Fund 14,291 63 

Sale of state lands 617 75 

School Revenue Tuition Fund 4,442,817 11 

Permanent Endowment Interest Fund 45,871 72 

Road Fund 3,030,977 46 

Fire Marshal Fund - 62,622 77 

Hydrophobia Fund 22,070 14 

State Highway Commission Fund 7,029,864 83 

Auto Theft Fund 181,351 78 

World War Memorial Fund 400,175 54 

Agricultural Experiment Fund (Purdue University) 115,550 15 

Teachers' Retirement Fund 43,408 40 

Total $33,161,748 98 

DISBURSEMENTS BY FUNDS FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1922 

General Fund $11,708,617 64 

Benevolent Institution Fund 3,395,745 31 

Educational Institution Fund 2,472,938 11 

Vocational Education Fund 330,727 11 

State Debt Sinking Fund .' 340,000 00 

Unclaimed estates 151 65 

Sale of state lands 547 10 

School revenue for Tuition Fund 4,013,510 69 

Permanent Endowment Interest Fund 45,871 72 

Road Fund , 3,030,977 46 

Fire Marshal Fund 54,764 50 

Hydrophobia Fund 18,648 97 

State Highway Commission Fund 6,462,586 89 

Auto Theft Fund 119,975 10 

World War Memorial Fund 7,625 51 

Agricultural Experiment Station (Purdue University) 57,775 07 

Total $32,060,462 83 



106 Year Book 

STATEMENT OF NET RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

Showing Advancements, Refunds, Transfers and Temporary Loans 

Made and Repaid During the Fiscal Year Ending 

September 30, 1922 

GENERAL FUND 

Governor's Emergency Contingent Fund — Disbursements Receipts 

Advanced to Teachers' Retirement Fund $9,500 00 $9,500 00 

Refund from Teachers' Retirement Fund 9,500 00 9,500 00 

Expenses advanced account of opening of Staunton 

coal mines 164 77 

Refund of expenses on account of opening Staunton 

coal mines 164 77 

Transfer to superintendent buildings and grounds — 

Heating and Fuel Fund 1,746 95 1,746 95 

Refund to superintendent buildings and grounds — 

Labor Fund 182 50 182 50 

Governor's Civil and Military Contingent Fund — 

Expenses advanced to Foch Day Committee 1,937 79 

Refund expenses Foch Day Committee 1,937 79 

Attorney General advance by Board of Finance 1,000 00 1,000 00 

Circuit Court Judge's Salary refunded 350 00 350 00 

State Board of Attendance account — refund 24 00 24 00 

State Board of Charities — advancement, transportation... 900 00 900 00 

Department of Conservation — 

Transfer from Fish and Game Fund to Salaries and 

Expense Fund 4,258 80 4,258 80 

Transfer from Emergency and Contingent Fund to 

Conservation Department— Revolving Fund 6,287 06 6,287 06 

Refund to division of engineering, expenses incurred 

on account of new Reformatory 72 65 72 65 

Girls' School — refund to maintenance account 63 16 63 16 

Boys' School — advancement by State Board of Finance to 

Industrial Rotary Fund 1,000 00 1,000 00 

Miscellaneous Transfers — 

From General Fund to World War Memorial Fund. . 48,651 20 

From General Fund to Teachers' Retirement Fund. . 43,408 40 

From General Fund to Vocational Education Fund... 18,334 52 

From Benevolent Fund to General Fund 3,391,106 67 

From State Debt Sinking Fund to General Fund 285,000 00 

Refund of taxes to counties account overpayment 2,735 91 2,735 91 

Temporary loans during the fiscal year 1,350,050 00 1,350,050 00 

Totals $1,500,167 71 $5,065,880 26 

BENEVOLENT INSTITUTION FUND 

Transfers to General Fund 3,391,106 67 

Refund of taxes to counties on account of overpayment. . 4,638 64 4,638 64 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION FUND 

Refund of claims erroneously paid 22 50 22 50 

Transfer from General Fund account of Federal rehabilita- 
tion law requirements 18,334 52 

STATE DEBT SINKING FUND 

Transfer to General Fund 285,000 00 

ROAD FUND 

Transfer to State Highway Commission Fund 2,854,506 94 



Auditor of State 107 

STATE HIGHWAY COMMISSION FUND 

Disbursements Receipts 

Transfer from Road Fund 2,854,506 94 

HYDROPHOBIA FUND 

Transfer to Common School Fund 13,284 85 

COMMON SCHOOL FUND 

Transfer from Hydrophobia Fund 13,284 85 

WORLD WAR MEMORIAL FUND 

Transfer from General Fund 48,651 20 

TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND 

Transfer from General Fund 43,408 40- 

Total advancements and transfers $8,048,727 31 $8,048,727 31 

NET DISBURSEMENTS AND RECEIPTS 
ALL FUNDS 

Gross disbursements and receipts $32,060,462 83 $33,161,748 98 

Less advancements, refunds, transfers and loans 8,048,727 31 8,048,727 31 

Net disbursements and receipts $24,011,735 52 $25,113,021 67 

GENERAL FUND 

Gross disbursements and receipts $11,708,617 64 $11,804,475 32 

Less advancements, refunds, transfers and loans 1,500,167 71 5,065,880 26 

Net disbursements and receipts $10,208,449 93 $6,738,595 06 

SUMMARY OF ALL FUNDS 

Balance on hand October 1, 1921 $2,989,490 91 

Gross receipts $33,161,748 98 

Less advancements, etc 8,048,727 31 25,113,021 67 

Total available for fiscal year $28,102,512 58 

Gross disbursements $32,060,462 83 

Less advancements, etc 8,048,727 31 24,011,735 52 

Balance on hand September 30, 1922 $4,090,777 06 

BALANCES BY FUNDS 

General Fund ' $264,461 62 

Educational Institution Fund 68,370 78 

Vocational Education Fund 64,965 93 

Unclaimed estates 47,563 00 

Sale of state lands 11,517 12 

School revenue for Tuition Fund . . .• 656,753 87 

Fire Marshal Fund 78,582 34 

Hydrophobia Fund '. . 19,706 02 

State Highway Commission Fund 1,860,712 12 

Auto Theft Fund 319,035 93 

Common School Fund 24,949 62 

World War Memorial Fund 572,975 23 

Agricultural Experiment Station (Purdue University) . . . 57,775 08 

Teachers' Retirement Fund ... 43,408 40 

Balance in Treasury September 30, 1922 $4,090,777 06 



108 



Year Book 



GENERAL FUND DISBURSEMENTS AND RECEIPTS 

Executive Department — Disbursements 

Governor's salary $8,000 00 

Secretary 2,500 00 

Executive clerk 1,200 00 

Stenographer 900 00 

Office expense 995 76 

Rent, light and heat 1,800 00 

Emergency Contingent Fund 34,723 08 

Civil and Military Contingent Fund 7,454 59 

Alteration and Repair Fund 28,521 68 

Committee on Mental Defectives 4,999 91 

Furnishing Governor's mansion 19,999 90 

Maintenance of Governor's mansion 2,500 00 

Garage 4,970 80 

Emergency Compensation Fund 17,518 82 

Lieutenant-Governor, salary 1,000 00 

$137,084 54 
Department of Adjutant-General — 

Adjutant-General, salary $5,000 00 

Chief clerk 1,175 00 

Stenographer 900 00 

Additional stenographer 900 00 

Quartermaster general chief clerk 1,200 00 

Quartermaster general stenographer 900 00 

Indiana Militia 201,736 82 

Riot Fund 52,085 03 

World War — soldiers' and sailors' record 2,857 88 

World War — soldiers' and sailors' record postage.... 1,200 00- 



Receipts 



$267,954 73 



Department of State — 

Secretary of State, salary $6,500 00 

Deputy, salary 3,000 00 

Assistant deputy, salary 2,000 00 

Clerk and stenographer 1,200 00 

Office expense 633 30 

Distribution of public documents... 250 00 

Distribution of court reports 200 00 

Foreign corporation and special recording 350 00 

Foreign corporation fees 

Domestic corporation fees 

Sale of court reports 

Miscellaneous fees 

Cashier, salary 1,500 00 

Securities Commission Fund 14,813 36 

Preparation of records, Securities Department 500 00 

Files 2,063 83 

$33,010 49 
Bureau of Public Printing and Stationery — 

Printing, binding and stationery $23,176 20 

Election Commission 3,203 48 

Supreme and Appellate Court reports 11,823 17 

Clerk's salary 2,700 00 

Assistant clerk's salary 1,800 00 

Messenger's salary , 900 00 

Office expense 252 56 



$12,118 65 
1,937 79 



$14,056 44 



$1,838 95 
91 10 



$1,930 05 



$68,826 45 

193,721 00 

5,026 50 

14,583 87 

36,435 54 



$318,593 36 



$43,855 41 



Auditor of State 



Department of Auditor of State — Disbursements 

Auditor of State's salary $7,500 00 

Deputy's salary 3,500 00 

Audit clerk's salary 3,000 00 

Settlement clerk's salary 2,500 00 

Audit department stenographer 1,200 00 

Land clerk 1,800 00 

Land clerk traveling expenses 62 36 

Land department fees 

Land department rentals 

Incorporation and miscellaneous fees 

Office expense 606 02 

Real estate dealers' license fees 

$20,168 38 
Department of Treasurer of State — 

Treasurer of State's salary $7,500 00 

Deputy 2,500 00 

Clerk and bookkeeper 1,500 00 

Office expense 379 97 

Adding machine 300 00 

Transportation agent's fees 

$12,179 97 
Department of Attorney-General — 

Attorney-General's salary $7,500 00 

Assistant 3,396 77 

Deputy 2,383 35 

Second deputy 2,100 00 

Traveling deputy 1,600 00 

Clerk and stenographer 1,200 00 

Additional stenographer 900 00 

Traveling expense 633 05 

Law books 167 75 

Office expense 484 16 

Anti-trust, prohibition, escheated estates and other 

cases 19,157 20 

$39,522 28 
Clerk Supreme and Appellate Courts — 

Clerk's salary $5,000 00 

Deputy 2,400 00 

Assistant deputy 1,500 00 

Copy clerk 900 00 

Record clerk 1,500 00 

Clerk and stenographer 900 00 

Office expense 576 93 

Supreme Court fees , 

Appellate Court fees 

$12,776 93 
Reporter of Supreme and Appellate Courts — 

Reporter's salary $5,000 00 

Assistant 2,400 00 

Second assistant 2,000 00 

Third assistant 1,000 00 

Office expense 97 20 



109 

Receipts 



$448 00 
500 00 
197 60 

350 00 

$1,495 60 



$50 00 



$50 00 



$1,000 00 



$1,000 00 



$3,705 25 
7,425 83 

$11,131 08 



$10,497 20 



110 



Year Book 



Supreme Court — Disbursements 

Judges' salaries $30,000 00 

Clerk-stenographers 6,000 00 

Librarian 1,800 00 

Messenger and assistant librarian 1,200 00 

Sheriff 900 00 

Law library 3,000 00 

Office and chambers 2,000 00 

$44,900 00 
Appellate Court — 

Judges' salaries $36,000 00 

Clerk-stenographers 7,200 00 

Messenger 1,200 00 

Expense 2,000 00 

Unpaid bills 362 16 

$46,762 16 
Superior, Circuit, Criminal and Probate Courts — 

Superior Court judges' salaries $79,461 27 

Circuit Court judges' salaries 294,268 33 

Criminal Court judges' salaries 8,400 00 

Probate Court judges' salaries 8,400 00 

Prosecuting attorneys' salaries 35,000 00 

Docket fees 

$425,529 60 
Department of Public Instruction — 

Superintendent's salary $5,000 00 

Deputy's salary 1,800 00 

Clerk , 1,400 00 

Stenographer 1,190 00 

Office and traveling 1,744 00 

Board of Education 8,796 16 

State Teachers' Training Board 10,137 08 

Elementary and high school inspector 10,247 39 

Board of Attendance 4,971 31 

$45,285 94 
State Library — 

Librarian's salary $2,500 00 

Salaries and expense 32,462 24 

Shelving 4,997 15 

$39,959 39 
State Board of Health- 
Secretary's salary $4,000 00 

Expense 29,326 82 

Child hygiene 19,998 88 

Food and drugs 28,402 05 

Laboratory maintenance 11,998 62 

Division of tuberculosis 9,999 96 

Weights and measures 9,583 02 

Baby book 2,112 59 

Venereal disease 43,588 21 

Cold storage license fees 

Leper Fund 1,466 26 

Water analysis fees 6,422 98 

Division of housing 12,941 63 

Infant and maternity welfare hygiene 3,603 96 



Receipts 



$350 00 



20,359 90 



$20,709 90 



$4,472 80 

24 00 

$4,496 80 

$12 20 

$12 20 



$183,444 



$1,700 87 
370 00 

5,920 00 

1,045 00 

20,700 00 

$29,735 87 



Auditor of State 



Board of State Charities — Disbursements 

Expense $14,999 89 

Agency Dependent Children 21,394 85 

License Fund 2,992 67 

Outdoor Relief 3,499 05 

Deportation 1,937 86 

Transportation 900 00 

$45,724 32 

Board of Tax Commissioners — 

Expense $59,657 38 

Secretary's salary 3,000 00 

State tax commissioners' salaries 13,500 00 

State tax commissioners' expense 1,948 85 

$78,106 23 

Board of Accounts — 

State examiner's salary $4,000 00 

Deputy examiners' salaries . . 6,000 00 

Clerical assistance , 6,745 00 

Office and traveling expense 1,721 07 

Examination fees 6,860 62 

Expense drafting General Salary Bill 635 00 

Budget Department 5,813 24 

Board of Certified Accountants 

$31,774 93 

Superintendent Public Buildings and Property — 

Superintendent's salary $2,500 00 

Assistants 36,000 00 

Repairs 19,987 69 

Illumination and power 6,868 69 

Water and ice 2,597 08 

Heating and fuel 11,746 95 

$79,700 41 

Department of Conservation — 

Salaries and expense $99,258 80 

Revolving Fund 44,605 88 

Fish and Game Fund 130,428 79 

Entomology License Fund 880 64 

Geology, gas well fees 1,800 00 

Miscellaneous receipts 

Division of engineering 15,071 92 

$292,046 03 

Industrial Board — 

Salaries and expense $79,978 44 

Fees 

Employment Commission, salaries and expense 21,078 64 

Employment Commission, license fees 

Department "Women and Children 516 34 

Department of Mines and Mining 1 7,931 84 

$119,505 26 
Public Service Commission — 

Salaries and expense $162,482 07 



111 

Receipts 

$900 00 
$900 00 



$1,278 80 



$1,278 80 



$182 50 



1,746 95 



$1,929 


45 


$4,258 80 


88,57? 


56 


148,964 


06 


626 


00 


2,430 


00 


86 


70 


72 


65 


$175,013 


77 


$17,750 


42 


562 


50 


$18,312 92 


$111,697 12 



112 Year Book 

Livestock Sanitary Board — Disbursements Receipts 

Salaries and expenses $28,790 24 

Receipts $4,001 00 

Condemned tubercular cattle 99,999 09 

Foot and mouth disease 225 00 



$129,014 33 $4,001 00 

Board of Pardons — 

Commissioners' per diem $4,560 00 

Commissioners' expense 571 26 

Clerk 1,50000 

Office expense 149 92 

Extra clerk and stenographer 134 15 

$6,915 33 
Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument — 

Maintenance $17,366 82 

Special 114 71 

Receipts and earnings $13,258 90 



$17,481 53 $13,258 90 

Board of Industrial Aid for Blind — 

Expenses $129,001 56 

Equipment Women's Industrial Department 1,945 51 

Purchase raw materials 4,972 53 

Receipts $83,377 80 



$135,919 60 $83,377 80 

Legislative Reference Bureau — 

Salaries and expense $9,448 45 $2 00 

Year Book 13,008 77 

Co-operative Crop Reporting Service 1,714 68 



$24,171 90 $2 00 

Oil Inspection — 

Food and Drug Commissioner, salaries $3,800 01 

Office expense 899 09 

Inspectors' salaries and expense 68,494 06 $168,392 73 



$73,193 16 $168,392 73 

Nancy Hanks' Lincoln Burial Ground Commission. . . $1,799 95 

State Soldiers' Home — 

Commandant, , salary $2,500 00 

Adjutant, salary 1,500 00 

Chief post surgeon, salary 2,500 00 

First assistant post surgeon, salary 2,000 00 

Second assistant post surgeon, salary 1,633 31 

Third assistant post surgeon, salary 923 38 

Maintenance 223,606 58 

Repairs and painting 18,799 06 

Garage 838 21 

Repair of steam and water lines 1,199 99 

High Frequency Electrical Cabinet 17 50 

One 100 K.W. dynamo and engine 25 00 

Hot water tank 112 50 

Receipts and earnings $807 20 

Government aid 20,580 00 

Clothing storeroom and equipment 6,315 62 

New hospital and kitchen, etc 135,662 10 

Power lawn mower 180 00 

Framing portraits Civil War officers 353 15 



$398,166 40 $21,387 20 



Auditor op State 113 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home — Disbursements Receipts 

Maintenance $116,857 38 

Repairs 8,995 99 

Library 299 75 

Musical instruments, supplies and gymnasium equip- 
ment ', 1,000 00 

Officers' salaries 4,678 20 

Insurance . . . 400 00 

Agents' Fund 73 86 

Construction ice and cold storage plant 2,200 20 

Tiling farm and garden 12 60 

Household furnishings 1,998 68 

Cylinder printing press 3,111 25 

New type for printing department 300 00 

Receipts and earnings $378 19 ' 



$139,927 91 $378 19 
Tuberculosis Hospital — 

Maintenance $89,099 38 

Repairs 9,999 78 

Turbine engine 2,249 86 

One ton truck and equipment 680 00 

Motor emery wheel and drill 249 22 

Fire protection 390 18 

Children's building 34,702 78 

Superintendent and nurses' cottage 6,341 87 

Kitchen equipment 621 00 

Fencing, tiling, etc 1,684 29 

Office equipment 84 00 

Moving picture machine 458 67 

Topographical survey 195 00 

Milking machine 100 00 

Clothing 999 98 

Receipts from counties $28,164 70 

Receipts from patients 994 43 

Receipts and earnings 95 74 



$147,856 01 $29,254 87 

Central Hospital for Insane — 

Maintenance $453,653 60 

Repairs 49,990 58 

Clothing 22.955 90 

Boiler room and steam lines 14,999 73 

Plastering 5,943 26 

Painting 15,914 86 

Plumbing and reconstruction department for women. 6,969 88 

Kitchen equipment ; . . . 1,898 54 

Chemical fire engine 1,939 75 

New floors and repairs 4,998 53 

Remodeling old buildings and erecting new building 

for men 258,338 50 

Iron fences 5,979 82 

Vegetable and root house 4,966 66 

Receipts from counties $18,169 69 

Individual support 17,882 19 

Receipts and earnings 1,941 74 



$848,549 61 $37,993 62 



8—22978 



114 Year Book 

Eastern Hospital for Insane — Disbursements Receipts 

Maintenance $230,110 67 

Repairs 19,871 33 

Clothing 9,382 64 

Farm building and equipment 15,285 76 

Kitchen and cold storage 846 50 

Two officers' cottages 5,436 27 

Receipts from counties $5,754 10 

Individual support '. 16,998 89 

Receipts and earnings , 482 96 



$280,933 17 $23,235 95 

Northern Hospital for Insane — 

Maintenance $277,781 06 

Repairs 24,999 90 

Clothing 11,999 23 

Repair Assembly Hall 4,347 14 

Installation soft water system 11,989 82 

Farm colony 5,823 53 

Receipts from counties $9,257 07 

Individual support 8,549 50 

Receipts and earnings 1,201 88 



$336,940 68 $19,008 45 

Southern Hospital for Insane — 

Maintenance $134,440 15 

Repairs 8,978 05 

Clothing 7,280 31 

Repair farm buildings 2,119 78 

Receipts from counties $6,148 97 

Individual support 3,996 50 

Receipts and earnings 3,889 90 



$152,818 29 $14,035 37 

Southeastern Hospital for Insane — 

Maintenance $306,907 09 

Repairs 14,999 38 

Clothing 8,499 66 

Bridges, walks, roads, etc 6,453 55 

Cold storage plant 5,929 88 

Farm colony 8,040 67 

Receipts from counties 

Individual support 

Receipts and earnings 



$8,493 
9,420 
2,196 


15 

00 
88 


$20,110 03 



$350,830 23 
-School for Feeble-Minded Youth — 

Maintenance $261,884 64 

Repairs and painting 17,500 00 

Black Hawk farm, fencing, tiling, etc 4,262 48 

Bath and toilet room repair 1,105 96 

Electric wiring 3,492 50 

Dehydrating and canning plant . , 817 19 

Repair fire loss, Black Hawk farm 3,292 74 

Individual support $7,948 02 

Insurance 150 00 

Receipts and earnings 592 32 



$292,355 51 $8,690 34 



Auditor of State 115 

Village for Epileptics— Disbursements Receipts 

Maintenance $125,994 31 

Repairs 11,996 90 

Groups female patients 157,731 50 

School house, chapel and recreation 1,188 00 

Industrial building for women 481 19 

Extension pipe line and water supply 4,200 00 

Farm improvement, tools, etc 500 29 

Receipts from counties 

Individual support 

Receipts and earnings 

$302,092 19 

Indiana Girls' School — 

Maintenance $118,793 50 

Repairs 5,996 44 

Tiling 1,499 83 

Household furnishings 4,537 80 

Receipts and earnings 167 25 

Receipts from counties 54,535 60 



$4,045 


12 


792 


56 


1,068 


99 


$5,906 67 


$63 16 



$130,827 57 $54,766 01 

Indiana Boys' School — ■ 

Maintenance $139,999 95 

Repairs 12,496 97 

Electric motors 649 98 

Livestock and farm equipment 4,544 29 

Beds and bedding 3,499 41 

Electric wiring 5,500 00 

Silo 1,000 00 

Industrial Rotary Fund 748 06 $1,840 00 

Hospital addition and equipment . 343 48 

Shop and school equipment 4,750 00 

Receipts and earnings 440 97 

Receipts from counties 76,734 40 



$173,532 14 $79,015 37 

Indiana Women's Prison — 

Maintenance $33,562 35 

Repairs - . 2,703 46 

Rotary Fund 766 80 $213 95 

Receipts and earnings 4,205 55 



$37,032 61 $4,419 50 

Indiana State Prison — 

Maintenance $295,024 47 

Repairs 10,000 00 

Discharge, parole, supervision and rewards 18,000 00 

Library and amusements 1,500 00 

Binder twine 576,248 09 $896,479 03 

Farm Fund 21,997 24 18,866 98 

Annex to hospital for criminal insane 374 20 

Laundry for hospital criminal insane . . . . ; 10,000 00 

Insurance 1,104 00 

Receipts and earnings 656 26 



$934,248 00 $916,002 27 



116 



Year Book 



Indiana Reformatory — Disbursements 

Maintenance , $253,336 12 

Repairs 13,325 68 

Trade school 14,983 75 

School of letters 9,791 27 

Parole, discharge and supervision prisoners 28,787 49 

Farm Fund 3,720 77 

Receipts and earnings 

Manufacturing trade school 150,310 90 

Clothing 10,000 00 

Heat, light and water connections 2,099 77 

Installation fire signals and water plugs 1,868 52 

Bath, toilets and linen 1,174 43 

Store room, cold storage and ice 299 70 

Relocation of reformatory 358,432 19 

$848,130 59 

Indiana State Farm — 

Maintenance $97,491 96 

Repairs 2,998 38 

Recapturing prisoners 527 31 

Industry Fund 67,811 80 

Nursery stock 998 35 

Cold storage plant 2,346 50 

Transportation of prisoners 

Receipts and earnings 

Completion of dormitory and hospital 891 41 

White lead and oil 998 28 

Radiation dryer and brick kiln 1,485 13 

Blacksmith, carpenter and machine shop . 1,215 64 

Sheep barn 3,132 55 

Brick cottage 1,475 06 

Woven wire fencing 1,198 98 

Wire netting 197 76 

$182,769 11 

Indiana School for Deaf — 

Maintenance $121,284 54 

Repairs 4,813 12 

Industries 5,836 08 

Library , . 246 90 

Painting 1,307 64 

Receipts and earnings 

Receipts from counties 

Coal bunkers and coal handling equipment 3,065 30 

Fencing, tools and agricultural equipment 636 40 

$137,189 98 

Indiana School for Blind — 

Maintenance $62,508 04 

Repairs 2,489 67 

Books, musical instruments, etc 1,481 81 

Receipts and earnings 

Household equipment 1,924 69 

Auto truck and closed car 1,491 59 



Receipts 



$4,927 44 

1,073 61 

178,363 15 



$184,364 20 



$91,175 


13 


4,104 


77 


811 


22 



$96,091 12 



917 82 
149 03 



$1,066 85 



387 73 



$69,895 80 



$387 73 



Auditor of State 117 

Farm Colony for Feeble-Minded — Disbursements Receipts 

Maintenance $49,551 73 

Repairs and painting 6,506 35 

Building and equipping three colony houses 15,956 01 

Administration and service building 25,587 26 

Nursery stock 107 52 

Purchase of live stock 314 44 

Fencing and tiling farm 4,993 29 

Recapture and return of inmates 170 35 

Receipts and earnings 746 08 

Individual support 3,869 88 



Banking Department — 

Bank Commissioner's salary $5,000 00 

Employees' salaries 35,774 99 

Bank Examiners' expense 10,164 41 

Building and Loan Examiners' expense 3,098 06 

Loan and Credit Examiners' expense 9 66 

Contingent Fund 1,154 12 

Printing 726 92 

Postage 250 00 

Expense and special fees 

Bank fees '. 



Board of Pharmacy — 
Pharmacy Fund . . . 
Anti-Narcotic Fund 



$103,186 95 $4,615 96 

Purdue University — 

United States appropriation $50,000 00 $50,000 00 

Annual State appropriation 177,250 00 

Interest on bonds 17,000 00 

Appropriation, General Fund one cent levy, Acts 1921 102,377 94 



$346,627 94 $50,000 00 

Indiana University — 

Roert Long Hospital $65,000 00 

Riley Hospital for Children 28,245 00 

Appropriation, General Fund one cent levy, Acts 1921 102,377 94 

Waterman property, rental 3,163 50 4,201 00 



$198,786 44 $4,201 00 

Indiana State Normal — 

Construction Muncie branch $31,135 42 

Appropriation, General Fund one cent levy, Acts 1921 51,188 97 



$82,324 39 

Insurance Department — 

Salaries and expense $55,408 69 $14,749 20 

Insurance taxes 1,069,590 87 

Insurances fees 139,263 02 

Night watchman 750 00 



$56,158 69 $1,223,603 09 



253 53 


554 89 
92,480 31 


$56,431 69 

$5,002 54 
4,416 15 


$93,035 20 
$1,733 00 


$9,418 69 


$1,733 00 



118 Year Book 

Disbursements Receipts 

Emergency and Contingent Fund $149,134 64 

Legislative expenses 6,314 93 

Board of Medical Registration and Examination 4,928 58 $4,417 00 

Board of Embalmers 1,879 83 2,351 80 

Board of Optometry 1,371 73 1,174 00 

Board Registration and Examination of Nurses 5,702 55 4,822 00 

Indiana Board of Agriculture 277,381 32 50,000 00 

Horticultural Society 2,999 26 

Dairymen's Association 500 00 

Stock Breeders' Association 418 89 

State Corn Growers' Association 868 34 

Indiana Historical Commission 18,663 02 301 80 

Grand Army of the Republic 2,498 30 

Specific appropriations 45,116 92 

Lunacy Commission 63 00 

Escaped prisoners — Sheriff's expense 765 00 

Puulic Library Commission 21,239 52 

Memorial Art Commission 31 73 

Academy of Science 3,480 17 

Board of Finance 1,000 00 

Rhoda J. Chase Pension Fund 1,200 00 

Indiana World War Memorial 48,651 20 

Juvenile Probation Officer 6,704 36 

Battle Flag Commission 1,907 90 

Teachers' Retirement Fund 502,826 55 502,825 65 

Board of Registration Engineers and Surveyors 18,151 48 26,896 00 

Temporary loans 1,382,809 13 2,850,050 00 

General Lawton Monument 2,000 00 

Codification of Drainage Law 341 89 

State tax 2,735 91 726,396 01 

Taxes transferred 799 33 799 33 

Depository interest 45,265 48 

Transportation tax , 37,141 13 

Vessel tonnage tax 1,058 34 

General Fund — Miscellaneous receipts 192 33 

Transfer warrants 18,334 52 3,676,106 67 

Total General Fund $11,708,617 64 $11,804,475 32 

BENEVOLENT INSTITUTION FUND 

Taxes from counties $3,395,745 31 

Transfer warrants to General Fund $3,395,745 31 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION FUND 

Purdue University — 

Tax from counties , $892,699 30 

Depository interest 665 12 

Payroll and miscellaneous $893,364 42 

Building Fund 232,355 52 

Agricultural Experiment Station tax 57,775 07 115,550 15 

$1,183,495 01 $1,008,914 57 

Indiana University — 

Tax from counties $892,699 30 

Depository interest 243 69 

Payroll and miscellaneous $892,942 99 

Building Fund 2,674 12 



$895,617 11 $892,942 99 



Auditor of State 119 

Indiana State Normal — Disbursements Receipts 

Tax from counties $446,349 66 

Depository interest 818 11 

Payroll and miscellaneous $446,601 06 

Building Fund 5,000 00 



$451,601 06 $447,167 77 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL FUND 

Industrial, agricultural and domestic science $246,841 21 $22 50 

County Agents 82,814 27 

Depository interest 1,071 63 1,071 63 

Government aid 117,625 32 

Tax from counties 200,890 36 

State aid, rehabilitation 18,334 52 



$330,727 11 $337,944 33 

STATE DEBT SINKING FUND 

Temporary loan to Indiana Board of Agriculture $55,000 00 

Temporary transfer to General Fund 285,000 00 

$340,000 00 

COMMON SCHOOL FUND 

Transfer from Hydrophobia Fund $13,284 85 

Reclamation state land 1,006 78 



$14,291 63 

SALE OF STATE LANDS 

Sale of state land $547 10 $617 75 

UNCLAIMED ESTATES 

Unclaimed estates $151 65 $489 56 

SCHOOL REVENUE FOR TUITION 

Tax from counties $3,796,525 73 

School Fund interest 632,585 01 

Unclaimed fees 1,263 89 

Manuscript fees 4,270 02 

Show license , 8,172 46 

Apportionment $3,650,279 63 

Town and township deficiency 363,231 06 „. 



$4,013,510 69 $4,442,817 11 

PERMANENT ENDOWMENT FUND INTEREST 

Interest from counties $45,871 72 

Professors' salaries, Indiana University $45,871 72 



$45,871 72 $45,871 72 

TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND 

Transfer from General Fund $43,408 40 

FIRE MARSHAL FUND 

Tax from companies $62,622 77 

Salaries and expense $54,764 50 



$54,764 50 $62,622 77 



120 Year Book 



HYDROPHOBIA FUND 

Disbursements Receipts 

Receipts from counties $22,070 14 

Salaries and expenses $5,364 12 

Transferred to Common School Fund 13,284 85 



$18,648 97 $22,070 14 



WORLD WAR MEMORIAL FUND 



Tax from counties $7,625 51 $341,642 96 

Depository interest 9,881 38 

Transfer from General Fund 48,651 20 



$7,625 51 $400,175 54 



AUTO THEFT FUND 



Salaries and expense $119,975 10 

Fees $175,964 00 

Depository interest 5,387 78 



$119,975 10 $181,351 78 



ROAD FUND 



Automobile license fees $2,983,068 00 

Depository interest 47,909 46 

Expense and refund $176,470 52 

Transfer to State Highway Fund 2,854,506 94 



$3,030,977 46 $3,030,977 46 



STATE HIGHWAY FUND 



Disbursements $6,462,586 89 *$75,000 00 

Tax from counties 2,050,024 64 

Federal aid 821,912 91 

Inheritance tax 798,387 64 

Transfer from Road Fund 2,854,506 94 

Miscellaneous receipts and reimbursements 430,032 70 



$6,462,586 89 *$7,029,864 83 



Total $3^,060,462 83 $33,161,748 



*Note. — Included in the gross receipts to the State Highway Fund, as shown by this 
report, is check No. 76542, for $75,000.00, payable to the Treasurer of State, and the 
same represents an advancement of $75,000.00 made to the Director of the Indiana State 
Highway Commission, by the State Board of Finance, on May 17, 1921. 

As a result of this advancement in May, 1921, and its return to the treasury in Sep- 
tember, 1922, the gross receipts as shown on the Auditor of State's records for the fiscal 
year, ending September 30, 1922, are $75,000.00 greater than the actual receipts to the 
Indiana State Highway Commission Fund. 

STATE DEBT 

Purdue University — Non-negotiable 5 per cent bonds $340,000 00 

Five per cent stock certificates issued under Act 1845 and 1846. . $3,469 99 

Two and one-half per cent certificates issued under the same Act 2,145 13 — 5,615 12 

Temporary loans— Sec. 1, Chapter 168, Acts 1913 1,500,000 00 

Temporary loan for Indiana State Board of Agriculture 50,000 00 

Total v $1,895,615 12 



Auditor of State 



121 



STATE TAXES OF INDIANA 



YEAR 


1 
QQ 


o n> 

■si 

So 


as 3 

"3.13 

> m 

pq 


_ a 
Si 3 

m 


_ el 

H 

.2 3 

ii 

T3 1-1 

H 


a 
.2 

3 

1 

.2 
1 


a 
.2 

o 
O 
>> 

E 

■a 

w 


T3 

a 

is 

O 

a 


O. 

Wo 

■a 3 

JjOQ 

'P 
<5 


1 
si 


I 

o 


1900 


9 
9 
9 
9 
9 

12 
12 
12 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
7 
7 
7 
7 
4 
4 
2 
1 
1 
2 


11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11.6 

11.6 

13.6 

13.6 

13.6 

13.6 

13.6 

13.6 

13.6 

13.6 

13.6 

13.6 

13.6 

13.6 

5.2 

5.6 

7 

7 


5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

3.9 

5.9 

6 

8 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


1.666 

1.666 

1.666 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

2.8 

2.8 

5 

5 












29 666 


1901 












29 666 


1902 












29.666 


1903 












30.75 


1904 












30 75 


1905 , 












31.35 


1906 














31.35 


1907 














33.35 


1908 


3 
3 
1 5 












33.35 


1909 












33.35 


1910 












31.85 


1911 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 












31.85 


1912 












31.85 


1913 


i 

i 
i 
i 

.5 
.5 
.2 
.2 
.5 
.5 










40.10 


1914 










40.10 


1915 










40.10 


1916 










40.10 


1917 










35.10 


1918 










35.10 


1919 


3.9 
3.9 
3.3 
3. 








18.00 


1920 


.6 
.6 
.6 






20.00 


1921 


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1,548 22 

606 24 


643 91 
1,592 59 
113 45 
690 49 
490 16 


1,041 75 
806 32 

2, 195 59 
373 94 

2,221 26 


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1,287 81 
3,185 14 

226 91 
1,380 98 

980 32 


2,083 58 
1,612 68 
4,391 18 
747 89 
4,442 49 


1,350 78 
991 03 

1,868 02 
878 87 

1,614 42 


2,096 39 
3,612 99 
1,653 21 
2,223 81 
2,159 09 


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991 98 
680 75 
114 39 

128 77 
725 58 


077 86 
225 46 
114 75 
644 65 

818 67 


931 74 
777 75 
340 37 
071 47 
470 50 


125 34 
418 97 
586 77 
121 80 
663 75 


026 18 
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802 10 
318 30 
421 62 


144 60 
419 52 
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428 22 
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624 41 
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871 92 
393 09 
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189 24 
304 42 
227 25 
169 96 
650 64 


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175 93 
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250 69 
318 95 


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611 67 
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358 40 
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Bartholomew 

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Carroll 

Cass 

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Crawford.. . 
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Dearborn. .. 


Dekalb 

Decatur 

Delaware. . . 

Dubois 

Elkhart .... 


Fayette 

Floyd 

Fountain . . . 
Franklin . . . 
Fulton 


Gibson 

Grant 

Greene 

Hamilton. .. 
Hancock . . . 



Auditor of State 



129 



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2,267 95 
2,718 18 
3,843 27 
2,639 64 


1,408 57 

1,701 17 

1,892 74 

739 71 

710 98 


2,048 21 
3,187 37 
2,617 82 
1,317 95 
15, 145 64 


3,950 80 
1,036 56 
4,336 48 
27,779 92 
2,293 72 


313 72 
2,363 42 
1,017 24 
3,061 94 
1,161 20 


1,739 78 

2,105 40 

171 94 

660 50 

664 46 


1,2^2 04 

438 96 

765 73 

2,495 02 

1,544 90 


1,186 82 
1,710 86 
2,763 82 
873 98 
2,649 80 


695 53 
3,401 95 
4,077 27 
5,764 91 
3,959 45 


2,112 86 
2,551 76 
2,839 14 
1,109 55 
1,066 46 


3,072 32 
4,781 04 
3,926 74 
1,976 90 
22,718 55 


5,926 21 
1,554 86 
6,504 73 
41,669 87 
3,440 72 


470 54 
3,545 14 
1,526 17 
4,592 91 
1,741 91 


2,609 67 

3,158 13 

257 93 

990 77 

996 64 


1,863 03 
658 42 
1,148 89 
3,742 57 
2,317 35 


1,780 24 
2,566 30 
4, 145 75 
1.310 98 
3,974 71 


825 63 
710 76 
425 00 
707 01 

777 12 


620 78 
034 71 
615 36 
102 62 
865 65 


897 80 
295 77 
596 94 
872 96 
951 94 


594 14 
551 63 

776 16 
184 23 
920 44 


587 85 
498 37 
394 03 
261 00 
580 89 


353 20 
369 72 
418 61 
449 14 
481 55 


246 67 
621 31 
319 49 
584 21 
745 42 


791 32 
114 73 
801 54 
210 43 
860 90 


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579 64 
2,834 96 
3,397 73 
4,804 09 
3,299 56 


1,760 72 

2,126 49 

2,365 96 

924 63 

888 72 


2,560 27 
3,984 21 
3,272 24 
1,647 40 
18,932 ii 


4,938 51 
1,295 72 
5.420 63 
34,724 90 
2,866 76 


392 11 
2,954 32 
1,271 78 
3,827 42 
1,451 60 


2,174 75 

2,631 79 

214 93 

825 62 

830 55 


1,552 53 

548 66 

957 43 

3,118 80 

1,931 12 


1,483 49 
2, 138 57 
3,454 80 
1,092 50 
3,312 2'6 


796 39 
349 64 
977 28 
040 94 
995 65 


607 24 
264 74 
659 59 
246 40 

887 36 


602 74 
842 07 
722 64 
474 19 
321 10 


385 06 
957 04 
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248 88 
667 48 


920 98 
543 00 
718 17 
274 25 
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747 27 
317 80 
149 41 
256 28 
305 40 


525 28 
486 85 
575 07 
188 17 
311 25 


835 30 
385 98 
547 85 
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122 58 


to OOCOOO CO 
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147 86 
777 32 
927 39 
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330 89 
780 73 
590 25 
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310 17 
663 43 
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876 26 
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177 88 
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REPORT OF TREASURER OF STATE 



OFFICERS 



OR A J. DAVIE S, Treasurer of State. 

B. H. URBAHNS, Deputy Treasurer of State. 

AMY WOLFE, Stenographer-Bookkeeper. 
The office of Treasurer of State exists by virtue of the state con- 
stitution. The Treasurer is elected for a term of two years. He may 
succeed himself, but is not eligible to serve more than four years in any 
period of six years. 

DUTIES OF THE TREASURER 

The statutes prescribe that, "The Treasurer shall receive of the 
several county treasurers, collectors of the public revenue, and of all 
other officers and persons, all moneys whatsoever which are required by 
any act of the General Assembly to be paid into the treasury of the 
State. He shall keep, in books provided for that purpose, correct and 
separate accounts of all the moneys received by him by virtue of his 
office. He shall keep in like manner, correct accounts of all moneys 
paid by him out of the treasury." Payments may be made only upon 
proper warrants drawn by the Auditor of State. 

It is further required that "All public funds collected by the state 
officer or board having an office in the state capitol building * * * 
shall be deposited (daily) with the Treasurer of State," wfe© in turn 
shall deposit all such state funds, on the day following the collection 
thereof, in one or more banks or trust companies, which have previously 
been designated state depositories by the State Board of Finance. 

The Treasurer is ex-officio a member of the State Board of Finance, 
which board is composed of the Governor, Auditor and Treasurer. This 
board has supervision of all the fiscal affairs of the State. It selects 
state depositories with reference to the convenience of officers of state 
institutions using them. The state depositories pay monthly, into the 
state treasury, interest on daily balances of state funds at the rate of 
two per cent per annum on checking account, two and one-half per cent 
on semi-annual time deposits and three per cent upon. annual time de- 
posits. Exception to this schedule of rates is made on deposits on the 
state sinking fund, for 'which the depositories pay four per cent on 
annual time deposits. 

The Treasurer of State is also ex-officio custodian of the funds and 
interest-bearing securities of the Indiana State Teachers' Retirement 
Fund. 



(137) 



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1,709 69 


224 81 
1,780 02 

738 20 
2,234 33 

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1,285 01 
1,413 93 

128 19 
467 27 
486 67 


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303 95 

520 38 

1,763 11 

1,144 31 


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1,295 77 
2,170 09 

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Treasurer of State 



141 



„ JUNE SETTLEMENT SHEET 

Tabular Statement Showing the Amounts Paid by County Treasurers at the June Settlement, 1922, for the 
May Installment of Taxes for 1922. 



Counties 




Fayette.. 
Floyd.... 
Fountain . 
Franklin., 
Fulton... 



Gibson. . . 

Grant 

Greene . . . 
Hamilton. 
Hancock.. 



Harrison . . 
Hendricks . 

Henry 

Howard . 
Huntington. 



Jackson. 
Jasper... 
Jay 

Jefferson . 
Jennings. 



Johnson. . , 

Knox 

Kosciusko. 
Lagrange . . 
Lake 



Laporte.. 
Lawrence. 
Madison . . 
Marion . . . 
Marshall. 



Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery. 
Morgan 



Newton . 
Noble.. 
Ohio. . . 
Orange. 
Owen . . . 



Unclaimed 



144 15 



66 76 



Teachers' 
Pension 



$502 54 
2,267 08 
523 29 
690 22 
284 76 

693 10 
36 15 
520 90 
773 17 
301 98 

325 58 
805 19 
54 49 
343 78 
254 92 

402 83 
527 16 

1,119 39 
190 76 

1,191 45 

348 06 
259 98 
459 62 
226 82 
404 92 

540 14 
911 25 
417 46 
546 32 
557 38 

109 07 
567 81 
680 31 
953 37 
661 50 

357 23 
415 32 

466 58 
187 74 
174 16 

516 29 

764 50 

664 60 

329 61 

4,199 44 

1,021 64 

249 77 
1,104 75 
6,931 61 

572 68 

75 12 
595 79 

250 35 
767 55 
284 08 

432 46 
551 14 
43 17 
162 97 
169 26 



World 

War 

Memorial 



$1,520 88 

6,955 04 

1,602 22 

2,114 19 

875 21 

2,103 81 

120 00 

1,588 77 

2,346 88 

933 81 

1,000 13 

2,437 81 

173 01 

1,064 33 



1,234 45 
1,615 37 
3,456 38 
579 42 
3,710 03 

1,054 52 
809 30 

1,402 46 
687 41 

1,226 77 

1,666 65 
2,792 14 
1,296 15 
1,669 13 
1,700 18 

337 49 

1,728 41 
2,063 60 
2,943 64 
2,031 66 

1,099 55 
1,319 89 
1,434 04 
• 574 07 
557 70 

1,584 62 
2,439 77 
2,030 48 
1,018 31 
12,933 36 

3,120 71 

769 79 

3,377 44 

21,473 29 

1,744 71 

237 50 

1,805 76 
786 40 

2,335 57 
873 82 

1,323 85 

1,702 33 

130 80 

506 34 

529. 67 



State 
Tax 



$2,948 51 
14,911 34 
3,415 07 
3,832 30 
1,900 45 

4,179 30 
402 32 
3,235 63 
4,790 79 
1,877 00 

2,591 56 
4,882 26 
534 01 
2,684 74 
2,022 22 

2,522 32 
4,387 72 
7,647 29 
1,996 32 
8,817 10 

2,431 60 
1,569 45 
3,020 52 
1,448 48 
2,338 15 

4.179 69 
5,947 20 
3,545 27 
3,807 34 
3,614 04 

898 92 
3,474 91 
4,580 56 
5,642 50 
3,673 26 

2,557 26 
2,503 65 
2,950 44 
1,596 41 
1,366 84 

3,249 99 
5,435 74 
4,262 97 
2,259 13 
27,208 96 

7,534 61 
1,942 13 
7,644 32 
47,247 43 
3,514 36 

710 42 

3.180 20 
1,912 75 
5,006 92 
2,167 86 

2,535 
3,745 06 

346 
1,357 68 

870 54 



Benevolent 

Institution 

Fund 

Tax 



$15,206 43 

69,524 40 

16,017 28 

21,130 33 

8,748 56 

21,033 77 

1,198 13 

15,883 32 

23,453 20 

9,333 38 

9,997 87 
24,375 21 

1,728 76 
10,637 89 

8,019 79 

12,340 39 
16,147 68 
34,547 40 
5,783 34 
37,077 62 

10,543 04 
8,088 12 

14,020 64 
6,872 96 

12,265 71 

16 658 21 
27,911 29 
12,954 48 
16,685 98 
16,996 53 

3,375 74 
17,279 95 
20,631 90 
29,422 92 
20,308 21 

10,952 15 
13,186 09 
14,335 03 
5,739 23 
5,571 35 

15,840 32 
24,373 64 
20,298 64 
10,178 32 
129,277 37 

31,197 64 

7,695 11 

33,763 91 

214,619 72 

17,441 31 

2,373 08 
18,055 59 

7,858 99 
23,350 40 

8,723 67 

13,234 00 

•17,015 30 

1,307 70 

5,060 73 

5,292 57 



Highway 



$8,377 93 
38,406 25 

8,843 11 
11,672 29 

4,834 53 

11,595 31 
671 63 

8,764 30 
12,927 91 

5,163 82 

5,524 34 

13,430 66 

963 08 

5,886 88 

4,452 26 

6,815 57 
8,917 88 

19,108 26 
3,194 21 

20,540 91 

5,809 91 
4,480 44 
7,737 21 
3,787 78 
6,759 24 

9,212 46 

15,414 86 

7,172 85 

9,210 27 

9,378 33 

1,868 51 

9,531 25 

11,372 23 

16,273 84 

11,220 90 

6,036 54 

7,333 06 

7,921 67 

3,168 51 

3,102 63 

8,751 27 
13,565 28 
11,204 47 

5,630 00 
71,468 30 

17,219 57 
4.254 26 

18; 638 96 

118,782 11 

9,621 48 

1,318 49 
9,950 74 
4,361 23 
12,878 65 
4,819 69 

7,306 57 
9,411 72 
720 65 
2,802 55 
2,934 77 



School 
Tax 



$18,564 36 
85,765 75 
19,494 67 
25,060 41 
10,616 44 

25,454 19" 

1,584 51 

19,212 90 

28,598 08 
11,627 96 

12,710 99 
29 554 66 

2,339 43 
13,388 45 

9,995 55 

14,978 51 
20,604 86 
42,236 60 
7,791 51 
45,830 77 

13,031 90 
10,041 85 
17,037 46 
8,672 07 
14,921 22 

21,008 69 
33,924,03 
16,509 59 
20,540 78 

20.592 31 

4,543 37 
20,919 57 
25,210 14 

35.593 90 
24,826 47 

13,654 19 
15,924 47 
17,444 85 
7,323 22 
6,882 92 

19,126 22 

29.862 30 
24,697 88 
12,392 83 

156,346 81 

38,748 72 

9,610 30 

41,881 11 

261,590 44 

21,197 08 

3,096 80 
22,082 58 

9,789 32 
28,362 08 

10.863 61 

15,830 65 

20,860 81 

1,682 72 

6,424 28 

6,580 18 



142 



Year Book 

JUNE SETTLEMENT SHEET— Continued. 



Counties 



Parke . 
Perry . 
Pike.. 
Porter . 



Pulaski . . . 
Putnam. . 
Randolph . 
Ripley — 
Rush 



Scott... 
Shelby.. 
Spencer . 
Starke.. 
Steuben . 



St. Joseph. . 
Sullivan. . . . 
Switzerland . 
Tippecanoe . 
Tipton 



Union 

Vanderburgh . 
Vermillion. . . 
Vigo 



Wabash .... 

Warren 

Warrick 
Washington . 



Wayne. . 
Wells... 
White.. 
Whitley. 



Totals . 



Unclaimed 



$31 41 



$514 06 



Teachers' 
Pension 



$310 95 
109 99 
188 16 
642 04 
382 99 

290 80 
425 39 
658 84 
221 77 
680 51 

91 86 
723 24 
210 91 
262 83 
251 58 

2,160 08 

438 24 

75 90 

1,103 16 
474 84 

188 94 
1,482 20 

464 46 
1,367 45 

607 88 
447 50 
207 72 
183 52 

889 30 
520 41 
565 45 
404 89 



$57,774 36 



World 

War 

Memorial 



$956 94 

338 76 

591 83 

1,999 82 

1,180 55 

901 12 
1,304 61 
2,029 63 

677 92 
2,062 10 

282 12 
2,204 31 
666 12 
838 80 
769 06 

6,586 45 
1,335 35 
237 68 
3,393 19 
1,442 76 

575 25 
4,517 58 
1,451 83 
4,229 34 

1,870 53 

1,375 48 

651 59 

567 72 

2,717 23 
1,599 75 
1,788 04 
1,229 66 



$177,726 70 



State 
Tax 



$2,115 63 
1,088 49 
1,341 70 
3,990 88 

2,757 80 

1,638 22 
2,902 37 
4,204 45 
1,730 87 
4,036 74 

655 50 

4,527 84 
1,546 63 
1,568 89 
2,167 82 

14,346 94 
3,433 68 
756 42 
6,767 75 
2,951 73 

1,407 02 
9,356 95 
3,529 89 
8,458 54 

3,599 73 
2,302 44 
1,502 73 
1,387 47 

5,951 95 
3,378 58 
3,441 22 
2,717 12 



$384,411 63 



Benevolent 

Institution 

Fund 

Tax 



$9,565 44 
3,386 48 
5,913 65 
19,986 01 
11,800 48 

9,006 35 
13,041 44 
20,287 04 

6,777 21 
20,617 16 

2,819 97 
22,037 49 
6,657 21 
8,379 68 
7,688 71 

65,847 48 
13,611 41 
2,375 21 
33,918 08 
14,424 86 

5,750 98 
45,164 23 
14,508 50 
42,272 34 

18,697 15 
13,738 30 
6,513 50 
5,674 34 

27,163 87 
15,990 83 
17,865 47 
12,294 01 



$1,776,727 17 



Highway 



$5,287 31 
1,871 69 
3,281 94 

11,072 79 
6,524 79 

4,984 84 
7,203 70 

11,215 89 
3,741 13 

11,361 94 

1,558 08 
12,158 44 
3,697 54 
4,663 69 
4,244 63 

36,331 97 

7,537 89 

1,317 17 

18,746 36 

7,953 63 

3,172 25 

24,917 77 

8,043 52 

23,388 39 

10,334 55 
7,593 27 
3,613 64 
3,139 67 

14,993 91 

8,837 88 
9,926 02 
6,778 11 



$982,018 78 



School 
Tax 



$11,768 02 
4,535 45 

7,607 42 
24,107 28 
14,642 88 

10,921 87 
15,904 52 
24,545 71 
8,660 50 
24,706 00 

3,546 59 
26,626 35 

8,362 42 
10,069 20 

9,841 34 

81,586 88 
17,249 07 
3,119 54 
41,119 48 
17,410 55 

7,191 13 
54,863 52 
18,206 85 
51,594 69 

22,664 86 
16,336 35 
8.225 60 
7,177 99 

33,138 26 
19,451 79 
21,451 27 
15,028 95 



$2,176,702 65 



Treasurer op State 



143 



JUNE SETTLEMENT SHEET— Continued. 



Counties 



Educational 

Institution 

Fund 

Tax 



State 

Vocational 

Fund 



School 

Fund 

Interest 



Permanent 
Endowment 
Fund Indiana 

University 
Interest 



Agricultural 

Experiment 

Station 



Docket 
Fees 

Circuit 
Court 



Total 



Adams 

Allen 

Bartholomew 
Benton ....:. 
Blackford — 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Cass 

Clark........ 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford 

Daviess 

Dearborn 

Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware 

Dubois 

Elkhart 

Fayette 

Floyd 

Fountain. . . . 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant 

Greene 

Hamilton 

Hancock 

Harrison 

Hendricks . . . 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington . . 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jay 

Jefferson 

Jennings 

Johnson 

Knox 

Kosciusko . . . 
Lagrange 
Lake 

Laporte .'...-. 
Lawrence 

Madison 

Marion 

Marshall 

Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery . 
Morgan 

Newton 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 



$12,625 63 

57,394 72 

13,238 83 

17,457 66 

7,216 71 

17,441 48 
957 58 
13,144 17 
19,451 84 
7,679 44 

8,249 20 

20,234 15 

1,406 74 

8.748 44 
6,549 49 

10,192 06 
13,337 68 
28,443 05 
4,802 38 
30,419 01 

8.749 48 
6,636 71 

11,600 25 
5,702 97 
10,179 10 

13,719 04 

23,053 49 
10,640 63 
13,798 49 
14,064 95 

2,782 08 
14,311 73 
17,113 42 
24,224 29 
16,757 58 

9,032 56 
10,727 80 
11,825 01 
4,744 13 
4,518 54 

13,073 87 
19,795 00 
16,785 92 
8,377 69 
106,549 09 

25,801 28 
6,342 87 
27,914 22 
176,455 72 
14,441 14 

1,934 59 

14,981 22 
6,423 84 

19,342 59 
7,197 05 

10,934 97 

14,007 09 
1,085 18 
4,155 53 
4,333 39 



$1,261 10 
5,722 34 
1,320 46 

1.740 95 
719 33 

1.741 39 

94 47 

1,311 50 

1,942 22 

764 85 

822 29 
2,020 95 
139 61 
871 18 
650 68 

1,016 29 
1,330 03 
2,833 31 
479 43 
3,026 73 

873 82 
660' 42 

1,157 38 
569 52 

1,016 57 

1,366 76 
2,298 86 
1,059 15 
1,376 45 
1,403 39 

277 15 

1,428 36 

1,708 79 

2,413 12 

1,670 48 

900 88 

1,064 49 

1,178 67 

473 21 

447 89 

1,303 36 

1,963 16 

1,674 43 

834 66 

10,617 49 

2,573 90 
631 70 
2,784 41 
17,569 03 
1,441 09 

192 14 
1,496 11 

638 45 
1,930 53 

717 32 

1,090 22 

1,395 09 

108 38 

413 61 

430 93 



$2,211 84 
9,123 53 
3, 000. 59 
1,700 06 
2,000 00 

3,776 95 

1,500 00 
1,680 63 
3,981 49 
3,502 15 

3,519 27 
3,884 07 
1,507 09 
3,891 12 
3,166 46 

2,906 86 
2,203 14 
5,343 60 
2,482 88 
5,122 62 

1,542 80 
3,380 12 
2,950 28 
3,759 86 
1,836 91 

3,651 95 
6,432 17 
6,000 00 
3,250 82 
4,000 00 

2,495 00 

3,843 02 

3,549 22 

3,723 38 

3,219 46 

3,000 00 
1,552 81 
1,492 66 
3,700 00 
1,682 95 

2,888 45 
6.28fr50 

4,106 94 
1,872 71 
7,935 00 

3,375 45 

3,250 63 
4,704 39 
11,466 60 
3,093 36 

3,000 00 
3,979 89 
2,568 02 
2,248 53 
2,469 55 

1,135 38 

2,962 55 

402 95 

1,852 75 

2,105 37 



$188 27 
674 32 
246 04 
129 46 
149 78 

271 54 
84 16 

194 31 
342 25 
280 97 

314 49 

277 46 
116 05 
253 63 
218 53 

202 88 

236 85 
416 17 
160 70 
426 40 

140 14 

274 21 
215 67 
168 65 
171 14 

267 02 
623 51 
242 01 
266 39 
180 48 

196 01 

214 52 
253 99 

275 11 

264 58 

232 87 

126 19 

265 08 
228 49 
147 31 

196 63 

272 70 
283 55 
156 59 
300 55 

346 86 

196 25 

547 33 

1,683 41 

237 01 

112 89 
261 09 
178 01 
189 17 
183 22 



249 61 
47 06 
136 21 
139 75 



$1,005 13 

4.534 17 
1,047 62 
1,380 46 

569 50 

1,386 17 

72 30 

1,041 82 

1,546 32 

603 95 

651 21 
1,610 42 
108 95 
687 54 
509 78 

805 65 

1,054 42 

2,238 77 

381 48 

2,382 78 

696 16 
520 00 
919 17 
453 66 
809 85 

1,080 31 
1,822 49 
834 87 
1,092 56 
1,114 76 

219 28 
1,135 62 
1,360 63 
1,906 75 
1,323 01 

714 41 
830 62 
933 17 
375 45 
348 33 

1,032 56 

1,528 95 

1,329 19 

659 32 

'8,398 85 

2,043 29 

499 21 
2,209 59 

13,863 21 
1,145 38 

150 18 
1,191 58 

500 68 

1.535 22 
568 13 

864 89 

1,102 33 

86 34 

325 92 

338 50 



$196 00 
182 00 
143 00 

97 00 
110 80 

166 00 
20 00 

98 00 



28 00 

136 00 
366 00 
24 00 
77 00 
58 00 

131 00 

92 00 
94 00 
40 00 



96 00 
136 00 
112 00 
82 00 
66 00 

350 00 
115 00 
142 00 
200 00 

106 00 

16 00 
96 00 
182 00 
253 10 
128 00 

156 00 
96 00 
118 00 

42 00 
46 00 

98 00 
124 00 
128 00 
82 00 
84 00 

118 00 

120 00 

400 00 

238 00 

54 00 

43 00 
178 00 
178 00 
160 00 
132 00 

66 00 

107 00 
12 00 
36 00 

123 00 



$64,608 62 

295,460 94 

68,892 18 

87,005 33 

38,026 07 

89,843 01 
6,741 25 
66,676 25 
100,154 15' 
42,097 31 

46,078 52 
103,878 84 
9,095 22 
48,534 98 
36,700 24 

53,548 81 
70,454 79 

147,484 22 
27,892 43 

158,545 42 

45,317 43 

36,856 60 
60,632 66 
32,432 18 
51,995 58 

73,700 92 
121,246 29 
60,814 46 
72,588 68 
73,708 35 

17,118 62 
74 531 15 

88,706 79 
123,625 92 
86,121 26 

48,693 64 
55,080 39 
60,365 20 
28,152 46 
24,846 62 

67,661 58 
106,405 54 
87,467 07 
43,791 17 
535,319 22 

133,101 67 

35,562 02 
145,037 19 
891,920 57 

74,503 60 

13,244 21 

77,758 55 
35,446 04 
98,107 21 
39 000 00 

54,850 45 
73,110 03 
5,973 14 
23, 234', f 
23,84? 



144 



Year Book 

JUNE SETTLEMENT SHEET— Continued. 



Counties 


Educational 

Institution 

Fund 

Tax 


State 

Vocational 

Fund 


School 

Fund 

Interest 


Permanent 

Endowment 

Fund Indiana 

University 

Interest 


Agricultural 

Experiment 

Station 


Docket 
Fees 
' Circuit 
Court 


Total 


Parke 


$7,885 88 
2,790 82 
4,832 90 

16,394 96 
9,722 23 

7,403 85 
10,767 68 
16,718 56 

5,603 43 
17,108 33 

2.326 96 
18,242 30 

5,431 18 
6,805 70 
6,356 27 

54,498 10 
11,176 09 
1,944 38 
27,969 79 
11,956 18 

4,762 74 
37,388 58 
11,884 14 
34,778 95 

15,415 78 
11,334 65 

5.327 02 
4,668 03 

22,462 62 
13,197 95 
14,564 56 
10,191 96 


$785 90 

278 02 

480 29 

1,631 25 

968 72 

737 21 
1,073 66 
1,665 85 

558 94 
1,708 55 

231 96 

1,820 31 
538 35 
674 94 
634 00 

5,437 93 
1,138 87 
193 33 
2,787 67 
1,193 56 

475 33 
3,730 82 
1,181 88 
3,463 66 

1,536 29 

1,130 07 

529 43 

464 85 

, 2,240 77 
1,314 24 
1,446 12 
1,017 51 


$3,472 26 
2,196 62 
2,796 43 
2,815 30 
3,783 74 

1,108 34 
3,981 16 
4,295 28 
2,787 63 
3,533 60 

717 56 
3,747 89 
2,648 13 
1,896 67 
1,000 00 

7,633 43 
3,835 40 
1,665 48 
6,070 48 
2,636 76 

531 00 

7,822 78 
3,590 61 
7,048 36 

4,500 00 
1,800 00 
3,000 00 
2,195 05 

4,479 36 

500 00 

1,700 00 

1,944 31 


$208 65 
152 27 

173 58 
187 65 
216 87 

117 80 
208 47 
278 14 
194 91 
199 49 

72 76 
258 80 
204 28 

90 17 
168 19 

460 31 
212 16 
116 40 

394 03 
176 94 

72 67 
601 37 
135 97 
583 67 

268 94 
107 80 
202 49 

174 05 

395 76 
208 02 
174 97 
166 94 


$621 85 
219 98 

376 49 
1,284 07 

765 98 

581 58 
850 77 

1,317 63 
443 62 

1,360 98 

183 72 
1,446 45 
422 17 
525 68 
503 10 

4,320 16 
876 44 
151 85 

2,206 35 
949 65 

377 88 
2,964 45 

928 91 
2,734 90 

1,215 79 
894 84 
415 42 
367 03 

1,778 62 

1,040 22 

1,130 96 

809 75 


$92 00 
20 00 
165 00 
104 00 
78 0Q 

150 00 
92 00 

121 00 
26 00 

114 00 

46 00 
154 00 
42 00 
66 00 
40 00 

36 00 
16 00 
10 00 
94 00 
163 00 


$43,070 83 
16,988 57 




Pike 


27,749 39 




84,216 05. 




52 825 03 


Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolpn 


37,841 98 
57,755 77 
87,338 02 
31,423 93 


Rush 


87,489 40 


Scott 


12,533 08 


Shelby 


93 947 42 


Spencer 


30,426 94 
35,842 25 


Steuben 

St. Joseph 

Sullivan 

Switzerland 

Tippecanoe .... 
Tipton 


33,664 70 

279,245 73 
60,860 60 
11,963 36 

144,560 34 
61,734 46 

24,505 19 


Vanderburgh . . . 
Vermillion 


358 00 
144 00 
171 00 

164 00 
48 00 

122 00 
44 00 

200 00 
188 00 
114 00 
138 00 


193,168 25 
64,070 56 
180,091 29 


Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington 

Wayne 

Wells 


80,875 50 
57,108 70 
30,311 14 
26,075 13 

116,411 85 
66,227 67 


White 


74,168 08 


Whitley 


52,721 21 


Totals 


11,465,017 33 


$146,030 76 


$305,000 61 


$22,935 86 


$115,550 15 


$10,397 90 


$7,620,807 96 



$137.03— Refund State Tax. 
$5.45 — Receipted after settlement — Benton County Sp. Judge. 
$10.00 — Receipted after settlement. 
$5.45— Receipted after settlement— Benton County School Tax. 



Treasurer of State 



145 



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.;J 



REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF ACCOUNTS 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

WARREN T. McCRAY, Governor. 
WILLIAM G. OLIVER, Auditor of State. 
JESSE E. ESCHBACH, State Examiner. 

DEPARTMENT OF INSPECTION AND SUPERVISION OF PUBLIC OFFICES 

JESSE E. ESCHBACH, State Examiner. 
LAWRENCE F. ORR, Deputy Examiner. 
WALTER G. OWENS, Deputy Examiner. 

The public accounting law of Indiana is very generally endorsed 
today and we believe it to be the best and most economical accounting 
law of any State in the Union. 

The board consists of the Governor and the Auditor of State, who 
are members ex officio, and a State Examiner, appointed by the Gov- 
ernor for a term of four years. The chief executive officer of the State 
Board of Accounts is the State Examiner, who is assisted in the admin- 
istrative work of the office by two deputy examiners. The duties of the 
State Board of Accounts are to prescribe and install a uniform system 
of accounting and reporting for all public offices and institutions which 
will exhibit in clear, succinct and understandable form all receipts and 
expenditures of public money, the use and disposition of public prop- 
erty, and the sources of all public revenue; to determine the validity of 
all financial transactions involving public money; to formulate all state- 
ments and reports required for the internal administration of any pub- 
lic office; to conduct periodical examinations of the financial operations 
of every state, county, township, city and town office, as well as all 
public service industries, such as municipal light and water plants; to 
recover all public money unlawfully obtained by any public official by 
fraud, delinquency, negligence, peculation, ignorance or misunderstand- 
ing; and to guide and assist public officials in the discharge of the duties 
of their respective offices by the promulgation of administrative orders, 
rulings and regulations and the construction and interpretation of the 
statutes under which they are required to operate. 

UNIFORM ACCOUNTING 

In compliance with the provisions of the public accounting law, the 
State Board of Accounts has developed, prescribed and installed a uni- 
form and simplified system of bookkeeping and accounting for each of 
the public offices and state institutions of Indiana. Under this system, 
less time is required than formerly to keep public records. 

FIELD EXAMINERS 

The work of examining and investigating public offices and install- 
ing public records is assigned to field examiners, who are appointed by 

(146) 



State Board of Accounts 147 

the State Examiner. All candidates for the position of field examiner 
are required to pass an open, competitive examination, are selected on 
account of their integrity and ability and are assigned to duty in pairs, 
representing opposite political parties. At the close of each examination 
the field examiners confer with the officer whose records have been 
examined and verify each item of error charged against him; if the 
officer's explanation is satisfactory, credit is given for all items satis- 
factorily explained and the officer may then pay the amount of the re- 
maining errors to the proper authority and be given proper credit. Ap- 
proximately 85% of all errors and irregularities have been settled with 
delinquent officials in this manner by the field examiners. The discrep- 
ancies disclosed in public records by the field examiners are largely due- 
to mistakes and misinterpretations of the law, and public officers gen- 
erally have displayed a spirit of willingness and frankness in the adjust- 
ment of discrepancies. 

authority of the board 

The board of accounts does not confine its activities exclusively to 
the auditing of accounts of public officers and the recovery of public 
funds which are knowingly or unwittingly misappropriated. A mere 
audit of public accounts will give no idea of the range or magnitude 
of the irregularities and malpractices which have obtained throughout 
the State in awarding public contracts, disbursing public money and 
carrying on public work. The official acts of the department have been 
based on the theory, amply sustained by the express provisions of the 
accounting law, that everything should be done which will aid public 
officials in preventing the waste of public funds and guarantee value 
received for each dollar of public money expended. The operation of 
the department in the discharge of these ancillary public functions has 
yielded the most beneficent results. Among the more conspicuous and 
flagrant abuses which the board of accounts has investigated and prac- 
tically eliminated are the sale of "short weight" furnaces and bridges, 
vending of teachers' contracts, malpractices in the construction and 
repair of bridges and free gravel roads, and the practice of charging 
different prices for the same articles when sold under substantially 
identical conditions. 

ROADS AND BRIDGES 

The loss in construction of roads throughout the State aggregates 
millions of dollars. There are many instances where bridges did not 
contain the required amount of material as provided in the specifications, 
and were badly and improperly " constructed ; of short weights; of the 
construction of dredge ditches which did not comply with the plans and 
specifications; of short yardage of gravel and stone in the construction 
of roads; of various inferior materials and workmanship on public 
building contracts; of fictitious names carried on payrolls where no 
work was done at all; of the destruction of time sheets and time books; 
and of the endorsements of spurious checks to the extent of thousands 
of dollars by unsuspecting endorsers. These unfortunate conditions 
were made possible by the loose methods of doing business and the 



148 Year Book 

opportunities which formerly existed by which frauds could be prac- 
ticed by collusion among commissioners, gravel road engineers and 
contractors. 

Many of these practices have been eliminated by the investigations 
and examinations conducted by the State Board of Accounts through its 
field examiners and civil engineers. One obstacle which stands in the 
way of further progress is the fact that many county surveyors are 
without any technical knowledge whatsoever with which to perform the 
duties of their office. Almost invariably, the county surveyors have 
charge of the plans and specifications for all bridges, turnpikes, roads, 
ditches, drains, levees and other surveying and engineering work. The 
value of public highways alone which are constructed annually under 
the supervision of the county surveyors aggregates three or four million 
dollars. The law provides a per diem for the official services of sur- 
veyors; as high as seven per diems have been charged for a single day; 
and the expense accounts vary 500% in some counties in comparison 
with other counties in performing the same services; bridge companies 
furnish plans and specifications free to the county surveyor, although 
the surveyor receives pay from the county for preparing such plans and 
specifications, and the surveyor then uses his influence with the board 
of commissioners in favor of such bridge companies. It is such intoler- 
able practices as these which clearly demonstrate the necessity of an 
investigation as well as an audit and the election of men to the office 
of county surveyor of technical ability and known probity. 

MUNICIPAL BUDGET SYSTEM 

Under the provisions of the public accounting law, providing for the 
adoption and installation of complete forms, records and accounts for the 
proper conservation of all public expenditures, the State Board of Ac- 
counts is entrusted with the necessary authority to prepare forms for 
the estimate of receipts and expenditures for public offices, and the de- 
partment has prepared a complete budget system for all county, city, 
town and township offices. 

The adoption of the "budget system" as prescribed and installed by 
this department in the various offices throughout the state means a 
total saving of large sums of money annually and materially reduces 
the expense of examination of public offices by the State Board of Ac- 
counts. The president of the county council of one of the largest coun- 
ties of the state asserted that by reason of the "budget system" pre- 
pared by the State Board of Accounts, they were enabled to reduce their 
appropriations more than $100,000.00 in one year. 

The statement has frequently been made by persons who do not 
understand the work of the department, that every dollar expended in 
its administration was a total loss to the state and its municipalities. 
For the information of those who insist upon measuring the value of 
the law in dollars and cents, we set out herein a condensed financial 
statement of the expense of the department and the total recoveries to 
the state and its municipalities for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1922. 



State Boaed of Accounts 149 

While it is shown there has been recovered and returned to the dif- 
ferent municipalities, as the result of our examinations, $163,816.29 over 
and above the total expense of the department, the preventive and re- 
pressive effect has been worth many times this amount to the taxpayers 
of the state. 

state budget 

The General Assembly of 1921 enacted a law providing for a budget 
report and a budget bill to be prepared by the State Examiner and sub- 
mitted by him to the Governor for transmission to the General Assembly. 

Under the provisions of this act, each and every department of the 
state government, except the General Assembly, shall submit to and file 
with the State Examiner of the State Board of Accounts written state- 
ments showing appropriations, expenditures and income of each of such 
departments for the fiscal biennium ending on the 30th day of Sep- 
tember next preceding the filing of such statement and estimates of 
necessary expenditures, appropriations, etc., for the fiscal biennium 
beginning, on the first day of October of the calendar year next suc- 
ceeding the filing of such statement. From such statements, the State 
Examiner will submit to the Governor his report of recommended ex- 
penditures and sources of income for the last designated fiscal biennium. 

The act repeals the law creating a visitation committee and it 
necessarily becomes the duty of the State Examiner personally to visit 
each institution and department of the state government and be pre- 
pared wisely to advise the Governor and General Assembly upon all mat- 
ters contained in said report. 



state board of accounts 

Statement of Charges and Settlements for Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 1922 

Charges pending in department October 1, 1921 $396,435 20 

Charges docketed during year ending September 30, 1922 584,134 61 

Total $980,569 81 

Adjusted by field examiners $162,883 61 

Paid to department 195 00 

Paid to municipalities 28,330 78 

Total payments $191,409 39 

Credits on explanation 7,291 00 

Certified to Governor 226,607 68 

Pending settlement October 1, 1922 555,261 74 

$980,569 81 

REPORTS CERTIFIED AND RECALLED 

Pending settlement October 1, 1921 $13,318 84 

Recalled during year ending September 30, 1922 143,622 12 

Total ; . . . , $156,940 96 

Settled $100,000 00 

Pending October 1, 1922 56,940 96 

■ 156,940 96 



150 Year Book 

CERTIFIED REPORTS 

Pending settlement October 1, 1921 * $492,485 73 

Certified during year ending September 30, 1922 226,607 68 

Total $719,093 41 

Recalled by department $143,622 12 

Collected by Attorney-General 6,835 16 

Dismissed by Attorney-General 122,781 48 

Pending settlement October 1, 1922 445,854 65 

719,093 41 

RECOVERIES 

By department § $291,409 39 

Interest collected .' 48 72 

By Attorney-General 6,83516' 

Total $298,293 27 

Office Salaries and Expenses, October 1, 1921, to September 30, 1922 

SALARIES 

State Examiner $4,000 00 

Deputy Examiners (2) 6,000 00 

Clerical and Expert Assistants 6,745 00 

Total salaries $16,745 00 

EXPENSES 

Traveling $748 32 

Postage 574 00 

Telephone and telegraph 216 39 

Express and freight 40 

Miscellaneous 181 96 

Total expense 1,721 07 

Total office salaries and expense $18,466 07. 

FIELD EXAMINERS 

Per diem $113,926 25 

Railroad fare 2,037 54 

Special expense 47 10 

Total 116,010 89 

Total expense of department $134,476 96 

Budget Department 
salaries 

State Examiner $2,000 00 

Budget Clerk 3,600 00 

Stenographer 119 00 

Total $5,719 00 

Traveling expense 94 24 

Total 5,813 24 

Total expense of department, including budget $140,290 20 



State Board of Accounts 151 

Statement of Appropriations and Expenditures 

Appropriated Disbursed Reverting 

State Examiner .' $4,000 00 $4,000 00 $0 00 

Deputy Examiners (2) 6,000 00 6,000 00 00 

Legal clerk 3,000 00 00 3,000 00 

Clerical and expert assistants 14,500 00 6,715 00 7,755 00 

Office and traveling 4,200 00 1,721 07 2,478 93 

Totals $31,700 00 $18,466 07 $13,233 93 

RECAPITULATION 

Total recoveries $298,293 27 

Total expense $134,476 96 

Recoveries over and above expense $163,816 29 



REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF CERTIFIED ACCOUNTANTS 

JESSE E. ESCHBACH, President. 
LAWRENCE F. ORR, Secretary. 
WALTER G. OWENS, Treasurer. 

Due to the efforts of Senator C. O. Holmes of Gary, in co-operation 
with the State Board of Certified Accountants, the 1921 legislature 
enacted a certified public accountant law which supersedes the 1915 act 
and is more in keeping with the present-day needs of the accountant and 
the operations of the State Board of Certified Accountants of Indiana. 
The new law became effective March 10, 1921, with the approval of the 
Governor. 

The chief purpose of the 1921 law is to elevate the standards of 
accountancy in Indiana by a close co-operation with other states on a 
national and uniform basis in holding C. P. A. examinations. 

The State Board of Certified Accountants accepted the plan offered 
by the American Institute of Accountants and conducted its first exam- 
ination under said plan in November, 1919. Examinations followed in 
May and November, 1920, under the same arrangements. The board 
realized that the plan was far more beneficial to accountants than at 
first anticipated and having operated under said plan could not afford 
to drop it. Consequently the 1921 law was written in order that the 
board might have full authority to make rules and requirements tending 
toward the closest possible national co-operation. 

At present, there are thirty-eight states, including Indiana, co- 
operating with the American Institute of Accountants. Examinations 
covering a period of two days are held the middle of May and Novem- 
ber each year on exactly the same days, the same hours, and with the 
same questions in all of said states. Manuscripts submitted by candi- 
dates so examined are graded by the board of examiners of the insti- 
tute and certificates are issued to applicants whom the examiners of 
the institute have declared successful. 

The Indiana law provides that a citizen of the United States or a 
person who has duly declared his intention of becoming such citizen, 
not less than twenty-one years of age; of good moral character; a 
graduate of a high school or having received an equivalent education, 



152 Year Book 

with at least three years' experience in the practice of accounting and 
who has received from the State Board a certificate of his qualifications 
to practice as a public accountant shall be styled and' known as a certi- 
fied public accountant. 

Under the provisions of the law, the board is required to hold semi- 
annual examinations for candidates desiring to obtain Indiana certifi- 
cates. The board is also given authority to issue certificates without 
examination to applicants who hold certificates issued by other states, 
provided that the requirements of such other states for obtaining C. P. 
A. certificates are substantially the same as those provided by the In- 
diana C. P. A. law and the rules of the board, and provided further that 
such states will agree to enter into reciprocal relations with the Indiana 
board. The board is also granted authority to issue certificates without 
examination to members of the American Institute of Accountants. 

As a result of the 1921 law and the plan of co-operation with other 
states under the American Institute of Accountants, the number of 
candidates has steadily increased and as a fee of $25.00 is required of 
each applicant for a certificate, a substantial sum is paid into the state 
treasury each year. The law provides that the amount in excess of 
$100.00 at the end of the fiscal year shall be paid into the state treas- 
ury after all expenses of the board have been met. Fees on hand from 
candidates whose applications have not been passed upon by the board 
are also retained in the treasury at the end of the year. 

The purpose of the State Board of Certified Accountants of Indiana 
is to maintain a high standard of accountancy. The Indiana certificate 
is attained through merit and qualifications and is unexcelled by any 
C. P. A. certificate issued in the United States. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



RECEIPTS 



Oct. 1, 1921— Balance in treasury of the board $125 00 

Application fees received 4,100 05 

Depository interest 35 51 

Total $4,260 56 

LXSBURSEMENTS 

Salary of secretary and treasurer $400 00 

Fees refunded 725 00 

Office and examination expense 1,406 76 

Sept. 30, 1922— Paid treasurer of state 1,278 80 

Balance retained in treasury of board 450 00 

Total $4,260 56 



REPORT OF THE INDUSTRIAL BOARD 



MEMBERS OF BOARD 

SAMUEL R. ARTMAN, Chairman, Lebanon. 
KENNETH L. DRESSER, Peru. 
CHARLES FOX, Terre Haute. 
THOMAS A. RILEY, Indianapolis. 
THOMAS ROBERTS, Indiana Harbor. 
LELAND K. FISHBACK, Secretary, Richmond. 

PERSONNEL OP COMPENSATION DEPARTMENT 

LELAND K. FISHBACK, Secretary. 

FLORA PAETZ, Reporter. 

BUREN BOUNELL, Reporter. 

MAUREE SONDAY, Reporter. 

IDA DROSDOWITZ, Reporter. 

JULIA D. BARNARD, Agreement Clerk. 

MURRELL BRITTON, Accident Clerk. 

FRANCES SARTOR, Insurance Clerk. 

EMMA HUPKE, Bookkeeper and License Clerk. 

LUCY H. BALCOM, File Clerk. 

JESSE LOWES, Insurance Clerk. 

ALICE MOODY, Stenographer. 

ELLEN O'BRIEN, Receipt Clerk. 

EDITH WAGAMAN, Receipt Clerk. 

HELEN TROUTMAN, Statistical Clerk. 

FACTORY, BUILDING AND WORKSHOP INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

JAMES E. REAGIN, Chief, Terre Haute. 

E. C. CALLAHAN, Assistant, Terre Haute. 

WM. H. HENDRICKSON, Assistant, Connersville. 

E. T. LOVE, Assistant, Elwood. 

WILBUR NUSBAUM, Assistant, Gary. 

ELMER YOCUM, Assistant, Indianapolis. 

LUCILE O'BRIEN, Stenographer, Peru. 

BOILER INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

BENJAMIN W. BISSELL, Chief, Indianapolis. 
OLIVER M. MARSH, Assistant, New Albany. 
JOHN P. CONNAUGHTON, Assistant, Indianapolis. 
GEORGE BUNGARD, Assistant, Terre Haute. 
CHARLES R. RAGSDALE, Assistant, Bedford. 
LUCILE O'BRIEN, Stenographer, Peru. 

MINE INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

CAIRY LITTLEJOHN, Chief, Hymera. 
ALBERT DALLY, Assistant, Knightsville. 
JOHN ELLISON, Assistant, Winslow. 

(153) 



154 Year Book 

THOMAS GILLESPIE, Assistant, Bicknell. 
JOHN STEVELY, Assistant, Clinton. 
S. J. WILTON, Assistant, Rockville. 
FLORENCE BIGGS, Stenographer. 

DEPARTMENT OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN 

MRS. LUELLA COX, Director, East Chicago. 
SARAH L. PROCTOR, Investigator, Union City. 
EDITH VENN, Investigator, Indianapolis. 
BERYL REED, Stenographer and Clerk, East Chicago. 

FREE EMPLOYMENT DEPARTMENT 

THOMAS A. RILEY, Director, Indianapolis. 

BLANCHE E. METZKER, Stenographer and Clerk, Muncie. 

FINANCIAL. 
1. Receipts. 

a. License fees $16,189 67 

b. Transcripts 1,260 75 

c. Water craft inspections 300 00 



Total $17,750 42 

2. Appropriations. 

a. Regular (Acts 1921, p. 76) $112,000 00 

b. Special mine (Acts 1921, p. 876) Indefinite 

c. Special blank (Acts 1921, p. 349) :[ Indefinite 

3. Disbursements. 

a. From regular appropriation . . $79,970 44 

b. From special mine appropriation 17,931 84 

c. From special blank appropriation 516 34 



Total $98,426 62 

RECAPITULATION. 

Regular appropriation $112,000,00 

Paid out 79,970 44 

Balance reverting to treasury $32,021 56 

Paid from all appropriations 98,426 62 

Balance of regular appropriation in excess of all disburse- 
ments ." 13,573 38 



COMPENSATION DEPARTMENT 

INJURIES 

Section 67 of the Indiana Workmen's Compansation Act requires 
all the employers of the state, within one week from the date of injury, 
to report to the Industrial Board each injury of an employe, causing 
the absence of such employe from work for more than one day. 



Industrial Board 



155 



During the fiscal year beginning on the first day of October, 1921, 
and ending on the 30th day of September, 1922, 38,604 of such injuries 
were so reported, which is an increase of 4,235 over the number reported 
for the year previous. 

Of the 38,604 accidents reported during the year there were 198 
workmen killed, 609 workmen suffered the loss of some member of the 
body, 3,653 workmen were injured in mining coal, 35 of these cases 
resulted in the death of the miner. The railroad companies reported 
3,131 accidents to their employes, 18 resulting in fatalities. The auto- 
mobile industries reported 3,183 accidents; two of these resulted fatally. 
In the manufacture of iron, steel and wire 2,850 employes were in- 
jured; 19 of these accidents caused death. 

The injury-reporting provisions of the law became effective on the 
first day of September, 1915. 

The injuries reported for each month between the 31st day of 
August, 1915, and the first day of October, 1922, are as follows: 



September, 1915 1 

October, 1915 2 

November, 1915 2 

December, 1915 2 



January, 1916 2 

February, 1916 2 

March, 1916 3 

April, 1916 2 

May, 1916 3 

June, 1916 3 

July, 1916 3 

August, 1916 4 

September, 1916 3 



783 
.717 
594 
696 
,684 
830 
114 
963 
394 
415 
607 
,379 
,496 



October, 1916 


3,838 


November, 1916 


3,631 


December, 1916 


3,265 


January, 1917 


3,835 


February, 1917 


3,223 


March, 1917 


3,705 


April, 1917 


3,123 


May, 1917 


3,366 


June, 1917 


3,256 


July, 1917 


3,592 


August, 1917 


3,778 


September, 1917 


3,320 


October, 1917 


3,552 


November, 1917 


3,482 


December, 1917 


2,881 


January, 1918 


2,772 


February, 1918 . 


2,516 


March, 1918 


2,976 


April, 1918 


2,702 


May, 1918 


3,294 


June, 1918 


3,207 


July, 1918 


3,143 


August, 1918 


3,592 


September, 1918 


3,403 



39,672 



41,932 



37,520 



October, 1918 3,421 



November, 1918 


2,604 


December, 1918 


2,900 




, 2,721 


February, 1919 , 


2,508 


March, 1919 


2,378 


April, 1919 


2,551 


May, 1919 


2,597 


June, 1919 


2,671 


July, 1919 


3,493 


August, 1919 


3,689 


September, 1919 


3,696 


October, 1919 , 


3,925 


November, 1919 


3,351 


December, 1919 


3,325 


January, 1920 


3,444 


February, 1920 


3,266 


March, 1920 , 


3,664 


April, 1920 , 


3,533 


May, 1920 


3,232 


Jurfe, 1920 


3,746 


July, 1920 , 


3,954 


August, 1920 


3,706 


September, 1920 


3,848 


October, 1920 , 


, . 4,109 


November, 1920 


3,402 


December, 1920 


...... 3,166 




2,857 


February, 1921 


2,362 


March, 1921 


2,679 


April, 1921 


2,435 


May, 1921 


2,536 


June, 1921 


2,559 


July, 1921 


2,617 


August, 1921 


3,040 


September, 1921 


2,734 


October, 1921 


3,064 


November, 1921 


2,696 


December, 1921 


2,673 



35,229 



42,994 



34,396 



156 Year Book 

January, 1922 2,633 July, 1922 3,663 

February, 1922 2,492 August, 1922 4,116 

March, 1922 3,023 September, 1922 4,325 

April, 1922 2,933 38,604 

May, 1922 3,258 

June, 1922 3,728 Grand total .. 270,347 

This covers a period of seven years and one month, eighty-five 
months, or 2,187 calendar days. In round numbers there were 124 in- 
juries reported for each calendar day — more than five for each hour 
and more than one for each twelve minutes. 

Of the above injuries fatals were included as follows: 

Between August 31, 1915, and October 1, 1916 268 

Between September 30, 1916, and October 1, 1917. 305 

Between September 30, 1917, and October 1, 1918 373 

Between September 30, 1918, and October 1, 1919 268 

Between September 30, 1919, and October 1, 1920 291 

Between September 30, 1920, and October 1, 1921 263 

Between September 30, 1921, and June 1, 1922 198 



Total 1,966 

which means that, for 85 months, one employe was killed by an acci- 
dent in his employment in each 27 hours. 

AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGE 

In making reports of accidents the employers are required to give 
the average weekly wages of the injured employe. The wages of all 
employes injured during each month were averaged by us and are as 
follows : 

Month Wage Month Wage 

October $25 04 April $24 10 

November 26 06 May 23 49 

December 26 07 June 23 52 

January 26 30 July . . 23 37 

February 25 93 August 23 70 

March 26' 32 September 25 59 

Average weekly wage, $24.95. 

The average weekly wage for the year previous was $28.65. 

There were 1,321 women injured in industry whose weekly wages 
averaged $13.07. Three hundred thirteen children under sixteen years 
of age were injured and the average weekly wage in these cases was 
$12.10. 

COMPENSATION ADJUSTMENTS 

Under the act there are two methods of compensation adjustment, 
one by voluntary agreement between the employer and employe to be 
approved by the Industrial Board as provided in Section 57; the other 
in contested cases by formal hearing and award made as provided in 
Sections 58, 59, 60 and 61. 

(a) Settlements of Agreement 
Settlements by agreement have been made as follows: 



Industrial Board 157 

Between August 31, 1915, and September 1, 1916 8,297 

Between August 31, 1916, and October 1, 1917 11,748 

Between September 30, 1917, and October 1, 1918 14,806 

Between September 30, 1918, and October 1, 1919 14,304 

Between September 30, 1919, and October 1, 1920 . . 18,545 

Between September 30, 1920, and October 1, 1921.. 17,838 

Between September 30, 1921, and October 1, 1922 18,416 

Total between August 31, 1915, and October 1, 1922 103,954 

which is an average of 47 plus for each calendar day during which the 
compensation provisions of the act have been in force. 

(b) Awards in Contested Cases 

Between August 31, 1915, and October 1, 1921 6,090 

Between September 30, 1921, and October 1, 1922 1,405 

Total between August 31, 1915, and October 1, 1922 7,495 

which is an average of 3 plus for each calendar day of the same period. 

LUMP SUM SETTLEMENTS 

Compensation is payable in weekly installments, except that, by the 
provisions of Section 43, after the lapse of twenty-six compensation 
weeks and the payment in full of twenty-six weeks' compensation, the 
present value of the whole or any part of the remainder thereof, in 
unusual cases, may be paid in a lump upon agreement approved by the 
Industrial Board. 

In case of permanently disabling injuries of a minor the board may 
order a lump sum payment at any time. 

Within the year lump sum payments were approved and ordered 
in 149 cases, amounting to $123,794.53. 

COMPENSATION BENEFITS 

Between August 31, 1915, and October 1, 1922, compensation has 
been paid in closed cases, that is in cases in which the compensation 
period either has expired or in which the full compensation liability has 
been discharged in lump sum settlements, as follows: 

Between August 31, 1915, and October 1, 1916 $267,401 03 

Between September 30, 1916, and October 1, 1917 582,435 85 

Between September 30, 1917, and October 1, 1918 914,426 86 

Between September 30, 1918, and October 1, 1919 1,090,737 83 

Between September 30, 1919, and October 1, 1920 1,186,303 60 

Between September 30, 1920, and October 1, 1921 1,790,141 96 

Between September 30, 1921, and October 1, 1922 2,356,055 90 

Paid in cases in which the compensation period has not expired and in 

which the full compensation has not been paid in lump sums 1,573,269 54 

Burial benefits in 1,966 cases, at $100.00 each (the amount the employer 

is required to contribute) 196,600 00 

Medical benefits in 270,347 cases, at $14.00 each (which is the average medi- 
cal expense per injury, as nearly as can be ascertained, and includes the 
fees of physicians, hospital charges, nurse charges and the cost of 

supplies) 3,784,858 00 

Total , $13,742,230 57 



158 



Year Book 



Separate reports for the Departments of Factory, Building and 
Workshop Inspection, Boiler Inspection, Mine Inspection, Women and 
Children and Free Employment are filed herewith as Exhibits A, B, 
C, D and E. 



DEPARTMENT OF FACTORY AND BUILDING INSPECTION 

PERSONNEL 

JAMES E. REAGIN, Chief Inspector, Terre Haute. 
LUCILLE C. O'BRIEN, Secretary, Indianapolis. 
EUGENE CALLAHAN, Assistant Inspector, Terre Haute. 
WILLIAM HENDRICKSON, Assistant Inspector, Connersvillei 
EDWARD T. LOVE, Assistant Inspector, Elwood. 
OLIVER P. MARSH, Assistant Inspector, New Albany. 
J. E. STICKELMAN, Assistant Inspector, Evansville. 
ELMER L. YOCUM, Assistant Inspector, Indianapolis. 
WILBUR NUSBAUM, Assistant Inspector, Gary. 



Following is the annual report for the year ending September 30, 



1922; 





Inspections 


Consultations 


Men 


Orders 

Issued 


Months 
on Duty 




764 
593 
416 
43 
690 
530 
551 


14 
10 
32 

2 
22 
37 
64 


17,588 
17,079 
25,954 
1,872 
70,232 
13,404 
27,383 


1,193 
1,354 

1,300 
50 

2,410 
617 
924 


12 


William Hendrickson 

Edward T. Love 


12 
12 
1 




12 


J. E. Stickelman 

Elmer L. Yocum 


11 

12 


Total 


3,587 


181 


173,512 


7,848 


72 



Mr. J. E. Stickelman, Assistant Inspector, Evansville, was succeeded by Mr. Oliver P. Marsh, New Albany 
on September 30, 1922. 

Number of fire escapes ordered 41 

Number of fire escapes approved 20 

Hotels inspected 91 

Schools inspected 52 

Theatres inspected 40 

Watercraft 59 

Total 303 

It is gratifying to report the wonderful increase in activities shown 
in factories and workshops, in fact, in all industrial centers relative to 
the employment of persons. 

Since submitting the report of 1921, we have found the increase 
in the added employes to average as high as 300% over last year and, 
in view of this fact, the number of employes fatally injured was 140, 
which in comparison to the number of employes shows a very small per 
cent pro rata. 

There have been numerous accidents due to elevators, both passen- 
ger and freight, and upon investigation we found that almost every 
accident due to the elevator has been through neglect. Statistics show 
a larger number of accidents than in former years, but this is due to 



Industrial Board 



159 



closer supervision being brought about by the co-operation of the em- 
ployer. In all well regulated establishments, they have a first aid where 
all accidents, whether minor or otherwise, are reported. In view of the 
fact that this practice is becoming more thorough leaves the impres- 
sion that the number of accidents is increasing yearly, which is not 
correct. It just means that they are being given more attention. 

The Inspection Department of the Industrial Board is authorized 
to inspect all places where the public assembles and, in view of the fact 
that the factories are experiencing a very heavy business at this time, 
there is more time being devoted to these industries. 

In making inspection, we are pleased to commend the attitude of 
the employer in complying with our department orders which, with- 
such co-operation, is bound to reduce the number of accidents in the 
State of Indiana to a minimum. 



REPORT OF BOILER DEPARTMENT 

PERSONNEL 

J. F. GEIGER, Chief Inspector, Princeton, was succeeded on April 

1, 1922, by 
WILLIAM V. GRIFFER, Indianapolis. 

BERTHA M. BYERS, Secretary, was succeeded on April 1, 1922, by 
LUCILLE C. O'BRIEN, Indianapolis. 

J. P. CONNAUGHTON, Assistant Inspector, Indianapolis. 
WILLIAM V. GRIFFER, Assistant Inspector, Indianapolis, was 

succeeded on May 1, 1922, by 
C. R. RAGSDALE, Mitchell. 
CHARLES HULL, Assistant Inspector, South Bend, resigned on 

May 22, 1922. 
THOMAS GRIFFITHS, Assistant Inspector, Logansport, resigned 

on October 31, 1921, and was succeeded on May 1, 1922, by 
GEORGE E. BUNGARD, Terre Haute. 

The following annual report of the Department of Inspection of 
Boilers is submitted for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1922: 

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS. 

Showing the number of boilers inspected, recommendations and 
number of boilers condemned by the state inspectors: 





Inspections 


Recommendations 


Condemned 




919 
501 
38 
521 
404 
411 


696 

215 

11 

71 

211 

81 


69 


William V. Griffer 


11 






Charles Hull 


1 


C. R. Ragsdale 


2 










Total 


2,794 


1,285 


83 







160 Year Book 

Approximately 11,000 internal inspections and 12,000 external in- 
spections were made by the various boiler insurance companies operat- 
ing in the state under the supervision of this department. Manufactur- 
ers' data reports on about 1,600 boilers were checked, and in a number 
of cases it was necessary to withhold admission for use in the state, 
as they did not comply with the state requirements. 

It is impossible for the average person to realize the importance 
and value of the above statistics in the prevention of loss of life and 
property. Most boiler users and manufacturers desire safe boilers and 
careful operation. There is always present the negligent, ignorant and 
avaricious who have not thought of their fellowmen. The protection 
rendered from this class of manufacturers, users and dealers cannot be 
covered in the above report. 

The state law, Chapter 111, Section 4 (a) and (b), states: "(a) It 
shall be the duty of the deputy inspector of the department of boilers 
to inspect or cause to be inspected internally, at least once every six 
months, all steam boilers, tanks, jacket kettles, generators and other 
apparatus used for generating or transmitting steam for power, or for 
using steam under pressure for heating or steaming purposes, and all 
other tanks or jacket kettles and reservoirs under pressure, of whatso- 
ever kind, (b) Boilers used less than six consecutive months in each 
year, and boilers used solely for heating purposes and carrying less 
than twenty-five pounds pressure, shall be inspected internally at least 
once a year." 

This is an impossibility with the present force of inspectors and 
office force. 

Many boilers are shipped into the state unrecorded; old, dangerous 
boilers are installed without inspection, and inadequate records are kept 
of present inspections. It is impossible to follow up orders given, and 
delinquent inspections. 

The present boiler laws are contradictory, indefinite and confusing. 
They make the farmer, the average citizen, pay for protection from a 
hazard which he does not create. This should be paid for by the parties 
causing the hazard. A new uniform boiler law should be enacted which 
will reduce the cost of boilers by standardization of manufacture and 
place the cost of carrying out these laws on the proper parties. 

The above statistics were compiled and the recommendations made 
by Benjamin W. Bissell, Chief Inspector, succeeding William V. Grif- 
fer on October 1, 1922. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND MINING 

PERSONNEL 

CAIRY LITTLEJOHN, Chief Deputy Inspector, Indianapolis. 

FLORENCE WHITE, Secretary, Indianapolis. 

A. C. DALLY, Assistant Inspector, Knigktsville. 

JOHN ELLISON, Assistant Inspector, Winslow. 

THOMAS GILLESPIE, Assistant Inspector, Bicknell. 

JOHN STEVELY, Assistant Inspector, Clinton. 

S. J. WILTON, Assistant Inspector, Carbon. 



Industrial Board 161 

The condition of the major mines of Indiana has shown a steady- 
improvement during the past year as regards ventilation and safety 
conditions. 

The personnel of the codifying commission appointed by Governor 
Warren T. McCray, authorized by an act of the legislature approved 
March 11, 1921, is as follows: William Johnson, of Indianapolis; Henry 
Adamson, representing the operators; John Hessler and William Mitch, 
of Terre Haute, representing the miners; S. J. Wilton and Cairy Little- 
john, representing the Department of Mines. The codifying commission 
was organized under the terms of the act by electing Cairy Little John 
chairman and S. J. Wilton secretary. 

There was a general strike of the major mines beginning April 1, 
1922, and continuing until the latter part of August. 

There are approximately 500 small mines employing less than ten 
men, which produced approximately 1,500,000 tons of coal during the 
year, operating generally during the strike of the major mines. 

There has been no great mine disaster in this state during the year. 

The production of coal during the working period has averaged 
with the preceding three or four years. 

The teaching of first-aid in the schools of Indiana, especially in 
the mining districts, is being carried on in many localities and we hope 
to get it generally established in industrial centers. The first-aid move- 
ment is being encouraged at all the mines and many operators are re- 
quiring their bosses to take training in rendering first-aid. 



11—22978 



162 



Year Book 





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Industrial Board 



163 



GEOLOGICAL TABLE 

Exhibiting by Counties the Names op the Various Coal Companies, the Name of the Mine, the Depth 

op the Overlying Strata, the Geological Number of the Seam Being Operated, the Thickness 

op the Seam and the Character of the Coal 

Clay County 



NAME OF COMPANY 


Name of Mine 


Depth 
of Over- 
lying 
Strata 


Geological 
Number 
of Seam 


Thickness 
of Seam 


Character of 
Coal 




No. 1 


75' 
49' 
80' 
63' 
110' 


IV 
V 
V 

V 
Rider 


2' 6" 
7' 6" 
8' 
7' 
V 3" 


Block 


Bays-Logan Coal Company 


Red Rag 










Bolt No. 1 






No. 1 


Block 




No. 2 




Brazil District Mining Co 


Hamlin-Heck 

No.l 

Plymouth No. 2 

Cloverland 


40' 
80' 
15' 
78' 
30' 


III 
III 
III 
III 
IV 


7' 8" 
2' 11" 
3' 6" 
6' 6" 
5' 


Bituminous 


Coal Bluff Mining Co 


Block . . 


Interurban Coal Company 


Bituminous 




Hyde No. 1 






Miller No. 1 


68' 
58 
56' 
59' 
155' 


III 
III 

Lower Vein 

V 

III 


7' 2" 
7' 6" 
4' 
7' 
6' 




Rowland-Power Collieries 


No. 6 

Old Glory No. 8 


Bituminous 
Block 


South Side Coal Company 

United 4th Vein Coal Co 


No.l : 


Bituminous 


White Ash Coal Company 


No.l 




Hydraulic Press Brick Co 


No.l 


35' 


Block 


3 6" 


Block 



Daviess County 





Thrifty-No. 1 












Montgomery No. 4 

Thrifty No. 2 


96' 
45' 
90' 


V 
V 
IV 

V 


5' 6" 
6' 
4' 
5' 4" 










No.l 











































Gibson County 







204' 
225' 
400' 


V 
V 
V 


6' 6" 
6' 
5' 8" 












No.l 














125' 
440' 
282' 


V 
V 
V 


5' 6" 

6' 
6' 6" 




Princeton Coal Co 


No.l | 

No. 2 


Bituminous 









Greene County 







60' 


V 


5' 4" 






No. 1 








127' 
36' 
84' 

151' 


IV 
IV 
IV 
III 


5' 

4' 10" 
4' 4" 
6' 6" 


















Calora No. 2 












No. 1 












No. 1 


160' 

30' 
27' 
160' 
35' 


IV 
V 
V 

IV 
V 


5' 
7' 
6' 
4' 
5' 






Jewell No. 2. . . 






J.&M 










Linton-Summit Mining Co 


Twin Nos. 5 and 6. 


Bituminous 
















Queen No. 2 


50' 
123' 
115' 
125' 


V 
IV 
IV 
III 


6' 6" 
4' 

4' 3" 
6' 
















Sleepy Eye Mining Co 


No.l 


Bituminous 



164 



Year Book 



GEOLOGICAL TABLE— Continued 

Greene County — Continued 



NAME OF COMPANY 


Name of Mine 


Depth 
of Over- 
lying 
Strata 


Geological 
Number 
of Seam 


Thickness 
of Seam 


Character of 
Coal 




No. 1 












No. 1 


133' 

65' 


III 
IV 


6' 
3' 6" 




United 4th Vein Coal Co 


Black Creek 






Robertson 




Vigo Mining Company 


No. 6 


153' 
114' 


IV 
IV 


5' 4" 
5' 6" 




No. 2 











Knox County 



American Coal Mining Co 
American Coal Mining Co 
Columbia Coal Company . 
Indiana Power Company . . 
Indian Creek Coal Co ... . 
Knox County 4th Vein Co 
Oliphant-Johnson Coal Co 

Panhandle Coal Co 

Panhandle Coal Co 

Ridge Coal Mining Co — 
Standard Coal Company . . 
Howe-Coulter Coal Co — 
Howe-Coulter Coal Co — 
American Coal Mining Co 
River Valley Coal Co 



American No. 1 . 
American No. 2. 
Columbia No. 2. 

Lynn No. 1 

No. 1.... 

Westphalia 

No. 1 

No. 5 

No. 6 

Knox 

Wheatland 

Tecumseh No. 2 
Tecumseh No. 3 

No. 3 

No. 1 



300' 
226' 

80' 
100' 
270' 

22' 
410' 
140' 

50' 
207 
238' 
154' 
240' 
262' 
Slope 



Big Muddy Coal Company . . . 

Birchwood Coal Company 

Busram Creek Coal Co 

Chicago-Carlisle Coal Co 

Chicago-Carlisle Coal Co ... . 

Dugger-Mutual Coal Co 

Ebbw Vale Coal Co 

Enterprise Coal Co 

Farmersburg Coal Co 

Glendora Coal Co 

Hamilton Coal Co 

Hamilton Coal Co 

Indiana & Illinois Corporation 

Hymera Coal Company 

Jackson Hill Coal Co 

Jackson Hill Coal Co 

Linton Coal Company 

Republic Coal Co 

Rose Hill Coal Co 

Rowland-Power Co 

Shallow Valley Coal Co 

Shelburn Indiana Mining Co . . 

Six Veins Coal Co 

Six Veins Coal Co 

Star City Mining Co 

Star City Mining Co 

Steele-Kattman Coal Co 

Sunflower Coal Co 

Syndicate Coal Co 

Templeton Coal Company 

Templeton Coal Company 

Templeton Coal Company 

Vandalia Coal Company 



Kettle Creek 

Birchwood No. 1 . . . 

Busram No. 1 

Carlisle 

Reliance 

Keeley 

Ebbw Vale 

No. 1 Black Comet . 

Rood 

Baker 

Hamilton No. 1 ... . 

Mohawk 

Paxton No. 8 

Hymera No. 2 

No. 4 

No. 7 

Little Betty 

Hocking No. 2 

No. 1 

Powers No. 7 . . 

No. 1 

Virginia 

No. 1 

No. 2 

Star City No. 5.... 

Star City No. 7 

Mayflower 

No. 1 

No. 1 

Glendora No. 26. . . 
Peerless No. 27. . . . 
St. Clair No. 30. . . . 
No. 10 



170' 



10' 
305' 

228' 
110' 
250' 



115' 

200' 

75' 

170' 

323' 

135' 

165' 

280' 

233' 

180' 

25' 

90' 



70' 
104' 



300' 
148' 



VI 
III 
VII 

V 
VI 
VI 

V 



VII 
V 

VI 
V 
V 
V 

VI 
V 

IV 
VII 

VI 

VI 



7' 


6" 


7' 




4' 


4" 


4' 




4' 


9" 


7' 


6" 


5' 


M 


6' 


5" 


7' 




5' 


6" 


ft' 


6" 


7' 


6" 


7' 




3' 





IV 



5' 10" 
4' 6' 
5' 

4' 8" 
6' 
5' 6" 



5' 6" 
V 6" 
5' 6" 
5' 6" 
6' 11' 
7' 

5' 8" 
5' 6" 
6' 

3' 10" 
5' 
6' 1" 



Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 



Spencer County 


Fox Hill Coal lining Co . . -. 


Fox Hill No. 1 


1 






Oak Knob Mining Company 


Oak Knob No. 1 
















Sullivan County 



5' 6" 



Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous' 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 



Industrial Board 



165 



GEOLOGICAL TABLE— Continued 
Sullivan County — Continued 



NAME OF COMPANY 


Name op Mine 


Depth 
of Over- 
lying 
Strata 


Geological 
Number 
of Spam 


Thickness 
of Seam 


Character ef 
Coal 


Vandalia Coal Company 


No. 12 


248' 


V 


8' 4" 




Vandalia Coal Company 


No. 16 




Vandalia Coal Company 


No. 17 


311' 
104' 
109' 
120' 
282' 
307' 
211' 

88' 
125' 

20' 


IV 
VI 
VI 
VI 
IV 
IV 
IV 
VI 
VI 
VII 


4' 8" 
5' 6" 
5' 9" 
5' 6' 
5' 

4' 8" 
6' 
5' 

5' 6" 
5' 






No. 23 






No. 14 






No. 15 






No. 22 






No. 27 






No. 28 




Vigo Mining Company 


No. 29 




Wooley, J., Coal Co 


Mildred No. 2 




Seventh Vein Coal Co 


Cummins 











Vanderburgh County 



Crescent Coal Company . 
Diamond Coal Company. 
Sunnyside Coal Company 



Crescent No. 1 . . 
Diamond No. 1 . 
Sunnyside No. 1 



256' 
247' 
268' 



Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 



Vermillion County 



Bickett-Shirkie Coal Co 

Clinton Coal Company 

Clinton Coal Company 

Clinton Coal Company 

Clinton Coal Company 

Clinton Coal Company 

Clinton Coal Company 

Dana Coal Company 

Dering, J. K., Coal Co 

Essanbee Coal Company 

Essanbee Coal Company 

Indiana & Illinois Coal Corp 
Indiana & Illinois Coal Corp 
Indiana & Illinois Coal Corp 

Interstate Coal Co 

Jackson Hill Coal Co 

Newport Coal Mining Co . . . 

Tighe Coal Company 

United States Fuel Co 

United States Fuel Co 

Vermillion Coal Co 

West Clinton Coal Co 

Whitcomb Coal Company. . . 



No. 1 

Crown Hill No. 2. 
Crown Hill No. 3. 
Crown Hill No. 4. 
Crown Hill No. 5. 
Crown Hill No. 6. 
Crown Hill No. 8. 

Dana No. 1 

Dering No. 8 . . . . 
Essanbee No. 1 . . 
No. 3 . . 



No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Universal No. 4 . 

Universal No. 5 . 

No. 1 

No. 1 

No. 1 



345' 
249' 
182' 
185' 
165' 
162' 
200' 
183' 
349' 



178' 



t*v 



110' 
249 
239' 
143 
130' 
185' 



V 
III 
III 
IV 

V 
V 
V 
V 
IV 
V 

III 



Minshall 
V 
IV 
V 
V 
V 



4' 8" 



4' 6' 
5' 

4' 8' 

4' 10' 

4' 8" 

5' 3" 

4' 8" 
6' 



4' 8" 
4' 6" 



5' 6" 

4' 8" 

4' 11" 
5' 
5' 

4' 6" 



Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous' 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 
Bituminous 



Vigo County 



Binkley, L. G. Coal Co 






III 
III 




Bituminous 








6' 


Bituminous 




Burnett No. 2 .• 








No. 1 












No. 1 


280' 
170' 
160' 
280' 
206 
225' 


IV 
V 

III 
V 

IV 

IV 


4' 
4' 
6' 
6' 
5' 
5' 


3" 
6" 
6" 

4" 
3" 




Dering, J. K., Coal Co 


No. 6 


Bituminous 


Dry Fork Coal Company 


No. 1 


Bituminous 




Bituminous 


Fayette Realty & Devloping Co.. . 


Fayette No. 1 


Bituminous 




Bituminous 






Bituminous 


Fort Harrison Mining Co ....... . 

Fort Harrison Mining Co 

Fort Harrison Mining Co 

Foxworthy Bros. Coal Co 




338' 
140' 
268' 


IV 
V 
IV 


5' 
4' 
5' 


6" 
8" 
6" 


Bituminous 


Clovelly.. 


Bituminous 
Bituminous 


No. 1 


Bituminous 


No. 1 


90' 
65' 


IV 
IV 


5' 
5' 




Bituminous 


Glenco Coal Company 


No. 1 


Bituminous 



166 



Year Book 



GEOLOGICAL TABLE— Continued 
Vigo County — Continued 



NAME OF COMPANY 


Name of Mine 


Depth 
of Over- 
lying 
Strata 


Geological 
Number 
of Seam 


Thickness 
of Seam 


Character of 
Coal 




No. 1 


59' 
486' 
270' 


IV 

III 

V 


5' 

5' 6" 
4' 8' 




Glenjean Coal Company 


No. 1 . . . 




Maple Grove No. 4 










No. 5 


180' 


IV 


5' 






No. 1 




Lower Vein Coal Company 


No. 1 Lower Vein 

No. 2 Speedwell 


192' 
295' 
160' 


V 
IV 
V 


4' 8" 
4' 10" 
4' 4" 


Bituminous 




Wizard No. 2 




McClelland Coal Company 


No. 1 




Black Hawk 


























125' 
156' 
285' 
260' 
250' 
245' 
240' 


V 

V 
IV 

V 

IV 

IV 

Minshall 


5' 
5' ' 
5' 6" 
5' 
5' 

3' 9" 
3' 




























Otter Creek Coal Co 




Block 


Otter Creek Coal Co 




Block & Bit. 


Otter Valley Coal Co .< 


No. 1 








50' 


III 


4' 






No. 1 








30' 

377' 
272' 
240' 
140' 


V 
V 

V 
V 
V 


5' 6" 
4' 8" 
4' 8" 
4' V 
4' 4" 






Sanford No. 2 






Shirkie No. 1 






St. Mary 




Sugar Valley Coal Co 


No. 1 






Old Soules 






No. 1 


219' 
183 
106' 
234' 
175' 
165' 
300' 
120' 
340' 


V 

V 

Minshall 

V 

Minshall 

V 

IV 

III 

IV 


4' 6' 
4' 2" 
4' 6" 
4' 8" 
5' 

4' 5" 
5' 4" 
5' 6" 
3' 












No. 74 






No. 82 




Western Indiana Mining Co 










Western Indiana Mining Co 

Willow Creek Coal Co 






No. 1 




Zjmmerman Coal Company 


Black Betty 









Warrick County 





Red Shaft 


180' 


V 


5' 


Bituminous 


Boonville Mining Company 






Korff No. 1 


50' 

120' 


V 
V 


6' 
4' 5" 






Chandler No. 1 






Cox No. 1 






John Bull 


60' 
196' 
130' 

37' 
Drift 

85' 
Slope 
114' 

96' 
128' 


V 
V 
V 
V 
V 
V 
V 
V 
V 
V 


5' 6" 

5' 

4' 5" 

5' 

4' 

4' 6" 

6' 

4' 

4' 

4 




Elberfeld Coal Mining Co .... 


No. 1 






No.l 






No. 1 






No. 1 












No. 1 
























Sunlight No. 2 






Sunlight No. 4 














61 

Slope 

80' 

61' 


V 
V 
V 
V 


4' 

6' 6" 
4' 2" 
4' 






Polk Patch No. 5 

Castle Garden No. 6 




Wooley, J., Coal Co 















Industrial Board 



167 






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168 Year Book 

changes in ownership of mining property 

Clay Countt 

Rowland-Powers Consolidated Collieries — Nos. 6 and 8 Mines, Terre Haute, Indiana — To the Maumee 
Collieries Company, Terre Haute, Indiana, September 12, 1922. 

Knox Counpany 

American Coal Mining Company — American Nos. 1 and 2 Mines, Bicknell, Indiana — To Knox Consolidated 
Coal Company, Indianapolis, Indiana, July 16, 1922. 

Indian Creek Coal and Mining Company — Indian Creek Mure, Bicknell, Indiana — To Knox Consolidated 
Coal Company, Indianapolis, Indiana, July 16, 1922. 

Tecumseh Coal Mining Company — Tecumseh Nos. 1 and 2 Mines, Bicknell, Indiana— To Howe-Coulter 
Coal Company — Tecumseh Nos. 2 and 4 — Chicago, Illinois, June 1, 1922. 

Owen County 
Putnam Coal Company — No. 1 Mine Coal City, Indiana— To Owen County Coal Company, January 28, 1922 

Parke County 

New Discovery Coal Company — Frog Pond Mine. Rockville, Indiana— To Parke County Central Coal Com- 
pany, Rockville, Indiana, December 29, 1921. 

Pike County 

Fork Ridge Mining Company— Fork Ridge Mine, Oakland City, Indiana— To Enterprise Coal Mining 
Company, Oakland City, Indiana, September 1, 1922. 

S. W. Littles Coal Company — Littles No. 1 Mine, Littles Indiana — To Neal Coal Company, Indianapolis, 
Indiana, August 1, 1922. 

Pike County Coal Company— Atlas No. 1 Mine, Petersburg, Indiana— To Howe-Coulter Coal Company, 
Chicago, Illinois, June 1, 1922. 

Simplex Coal and Mining Company — Simplex No. 3 Mine, Petersburg, Indiana— To Howe-Coulter 
Company, Chicago, Illinois, June 1, 1922. 

Sullivan County 

Rose Hill Coal Company — Rose Hill Mine, Sullivan, Indiana — To H. D. & F. Coal Producing Company , 
Linton, Indiana, August 22, 1922. 

Rowland-Powers Consolidated Collieries Company — No. 7 Mine, Terre Haute, Indiana— To The Maumee 
Collieries Company, Terre Haute, September 12, 1922. 

Steele-Kattman Coal Company — Mayflower Mine, Hymera, Indiana— To Hymera Mutual Coal and Mining 
Company, Hymera, Indiana, February 8, 1922. 

Vigo County 

Greogory Coal Company— Hein Mine, Terre Haute, Indiana— To Harris & Gregory Bros. Coal Company 
Terre Haute, Indiana, December 1, 1921. 

William Soules Coal Company— Soules Mine, Terre Haute, Indiana— To Durand Coal Company, Old Soules 
Mine, Terre Haute, August 20. 

McClelland Coal Company — McClelland No. 1 Mine, Terre Haute— To Columbus Mining Company, Terre 
Haute, Indiana, August 16, 1922. 

Greene County 

J. & M. Coal Company — No. 1 Mine, Linton, Indiana — To General Fuel Corporation, Hi Grade Mine, 
Terre Haute, Indiana, August, 1922. 



Industrial Board 



169 



ABANDONED MINES 

The Following is a List op the Abandoned Mines, as Shown bt our Rbcobds, for the Fiscal year 
Ending September 30, 1922 

Clat County 



NAME OF COMPANY 



G. W. Boyer Coal Co . . . 
Rowland-Powers Coal Co 
Coal Bluff Mining Co . . . 



Name of Mine 



No.l 

Old Glory No. 8 
Plymouth No. 2 



Geological 
Number 
of Seam 



III 
II 
II 



Date of 
Abandon- 
ment 



3-27-21 
3-31-22 
3-30-22 



Railroad 



Wagon 
Monon 
C. & E. I. 



Greene County 




No. 2 


V 
IV 


.... 22 
3-25-22 


C. T. H. & S. E. 




No. 6 


C. T. H. & S. E. 








Pike County 


S. W. Littles Coal Co 




V 


12-28-21 


E. I. & T. H. 










Sullivan County 










VI 

VI 


3-25-22 
1- 4-22 


C. & E. I. 




No. 4 


C. & E I. 








Vigo County 




No. 1 


IV 

V 


3-28-22 
4- 1-22 


P.C.C.&St.L. 




Wizard No. 1 


Pennsylvania 





SUMMARY OF TOTALS 
As Shown by the Records op the Department op Mines for Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 1922 

Tons of machine mined block coal 8, 958 

Tons of pick mined block coal 11 , 449 

Total tons of block coal mined 20, 407 

Tons of machine mined bituminous coal :. 8, 309, 013 

Tons of pick mined bituminous coal 6, 619, 970 

Total tons of bituminous coal mined ,' 14, 928, 983 

Total of all coal mined — 14,949,390 

Wages paid employes of block coal mines $98,487.43 

Wages paid employes of bituminous coal mines $27,563,637.50 

Total wages employes of all major mines in State $27,662,124.93 

Number of employes in block coal mines , 257 

Number of employes in bituminous coal mines 28, 601 

Total number of employes in major mines 28, 858 

Total days worked at bituminous mines during year 17, 241 

Total days worked at block mines during year 801 

Average wages paid employes • ; $958.56 

Number of fatal accidents at major mines , 36 

Number of other accidents at mines reported to Industrial Board 3,617 

Tons of coal produced per fatality in major mines : 415, 288 

Number of employes killed per 1,000 employed ! . 1 .24 

Days lost account of no orders 9, 895 

Days lost account of no cars 1, 840 

Days lost account of strikes (not including general strike) 937 

Days lost account of funerals ' 31 

Days lost account of other causes • 2, 155 

Number of deaths in mines due to natural causes 4 

Number of applications for certificate as M ; ne Boss, Fire Boss and Hoisting Engineer 463 

Number of applicants receiving certificates 206 



170 



Year Book 



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Industrial Board 187 

REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN 

For the Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 1922 

PERSONNEL 

MRS. L. LUELLA COX, Director. 

MISS SARAH LOUISE PROCTOR, Assistant, Union City. 

*MISS NELLE WOOD, Secretary, Indianapolis. 

MISS EDITH VENN, Certificate Clerk and Investigator, Indianapolis. 

The following is a brief summary of the office and field work of the 
department accomplished with the assistance of one worker in the field 
for eleven months, one secretary-clerk and one woman who divided her 
time since March 13th between the office and field work, spending two 
months in the field during this time. We were without a secretary- 
clerk for two months during the summer and during this time a school 
girl assisted in the office. 

INSPECTIONS AND ORDERS 

Cities in which inspections were made 177 

Plants inspected 932 

Plants visited but not inspected 3 

Men employed in plants inspected 54,101 

Women employed in plants inspected 20,923 

Boys under 16 and girls under 18 years of age 3,002 

Orders and recommendations issued 3,535 

The orders issued covered the following subjects: 

Seating 258 

Lighting 44 

Ventilation 121 

Sanitation 316 

General working conditions 400 

Postings 342 

Register and license 54 

Hours i 463 

Meal period 47 

Under 14 years of age 21 

Certificates 1,055 

Prohibited occupations 39 

Warnings 375 

Of the 747 orders not complied with at the close of the fiscal year, 
the greater number were those issued to canners during September and 
the latter part of August. As the fiscal year ends September 30th, it 
could not be expected that these orders would all be complied with in 
time to be included in the report. 

Special letters of commendation were sent to 53 employers because 
of the excellent working conditions found in their plants. 

Number and nature of violations of law concerning employment of 
women and minors: 

Minors 14 to 16 years of age working without employment certificates 284 

Minors 16 to 18 years of age working without minors' certificates 910 

*Miss Wood resigned June 1st and Miss Beryl Reed of East Chicago took her place. 



188 Year Book 

Minors under 14 years of age 31 

Minors 14 to 16 years of age working over 8 hours per day 128 

Minors 14 to 16 years of age working over 6 days per week 13 

Minors 14 to 16 years of age working after 7 p. m 17 

Girls 16 to 18 working over 8 hours per day under new law 237 

Girls 16 to 18 working over 6 days per week 3 

Girls 16 to 18 working after 7 p. m 25 

Girls 16 to 18 working before 6 a. m 3 

Minors working at prohibited occupations 32 

Minors employed with hours not posted nor register kept 462 

Employers violating one or more provisions of employment law 375 

Warnings issued 375 

Firms listed for reinspection ' 171 

PROSECUTIONS 

Four affidavits were filed with the prosecuting attorney of St. Joseph 
County covering two cases. The defendants were found guilty in both 
cases and fines assessed. Six affidavits were filed with the prosecuting 
attorney of Marion County covering a theater case, three affidavits being 
filed against the theater manager and three covering the same violations 
against the manager of the act. The manager of the act was found 
guilty on each count and fines assessed, while the manager of the theater 
was found not guilty, the case being tried before a different judge. The 
cases of four canners violating the child labor law a second time and 
after warnings had been issued are still pending. 

ACCIDENTS 

The department investigated the cases of 946 minors 18 years of 
age and under who were injured in industry during the year. Of this 
number 502 were illegally employed and not compensable under the 
Indiana Workmen's Compensation Act. Three cases were referred to 
the factory inspection department for safeguarding the machinery on 
which the accidents occurred. 

CHILDREN IN INDUSTRY AND EMPLOYMENT CERTIFICATES 

It was thought that the enforcement of the new compulsory school 
attendance law would greatly lessen the work of the certificate clerk, 
as fewer children would leave school under the higher educational re- 
quirements and enter industry. The number of certificates releasing 
children from school attendance and permitting their employment has 
greatly decreased, but there has been a greater corresponding increase 
in the number of vacation and holiday certificates and in certificates of 
age for minors over 16 years. Because of these increases there has 
been little if any decrease in the work of the certificate clerk. Ap- 
proximately 28,335 certificates have been received, edited and filed, dis- 
tributed as follows: employment certificates, 3,338; vacation and holi- 
day certificates, 6,026; age certificates, 16,096. In addition the num- 
ber of notices of certificates refused and notices from employers of the 
employment of minors would make the number of documents handled 
in this line of work approximately 35,000. 

The work of certificating requires the co-operation of the Industrial 
Board and the State Board of Attendance with school officials, attend- 



Industrial Board 189 

ance officers, health officers and employers. During the year we held 
262 conferences in 68 cities of 41 counties, as follows: 

City superintendents 54 

County superintendents 33 

Issuing officers 34 

Attendance officers 2 

Probation officers 3 

County health officers 23 

City health officers 30 

County or city officials 9 

Court officials • 5 

Employers .* 46 

School boards 13 

Miscellaneous 10 

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY 

Of the 932 plants inspected, 570 employed women in the production 
or service department and 460 employed women in offices. Many plants 
employing women in the office employed only men and boys in the shops. 

Perhaps for the first time in the history of the state all the can- 
neries were inspected during the same canning season. Of the 157 
canneries inspected, 141 were operating this season. A separate report 
of the canneries has been made and will be found on page . . . 

The following tables summarize the data collected concerning hours 
of employment in the plants inspected. The hours of employment of 
men in production or service departments have been tabulated so that 
a comparison can be made with the hours of employment of women in 
a state having no law limiting hours for women. 

Of the women who were employed in the shops 84.3 per cent worked 
more than 8 hours per day and 73.7 per cent of the men worked more 
than 8 hours per day. Of women in clerical work 25.4 per cent only 
worked more than 8 hours per day. 

The hours indicated on Tables I, II, and III are the regular sched- 
ules and take no account of overtime, to which there is no legal limit 
in Indiana. One hundred three plants reported overtime ranging from 
30 minutes on an 8-hour schedule to all night overtime at least one 
night in the week. The daily and weekly schedules of hours in the 141 
canneries inspected are included in the following tables. A separate 
table of the hours obtaining in canneries will be found on pages 206 
and 207. 



190 



Year Book 





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RECOMMENDATIONS 



A summary of the work of vocational guidance and placement in 
the two junior employment offices will be found in the report of the 
State Free Employment Service. 

We again call attention to the importance of: 

1. Extending vocational guidance to all minors under 18 years of 
age who leave school to enter employment. This service is provided 
for in the junior section of the state free employment act. 

2. Broadening the scope of the board of children's guardians law 
until it will be unnecessary for children under 16 years of age to remain 
out of school to relieve economic pressure in the home. Extending this 
work will do much to ward off the passage of a mothers' pension law, 
which might not be as effective as our present law if adequately ad- 
ministered. 

3. Amending the workmen's compensation law to include children 
whether legally employed or not, and providing for triple compensa- 
tion in cases of injury to children illegally employed. This would do 
away with the possibility of suits for damages under the common law 
and would seem to be fairer to both children and to employers. 

4. Making part-time school mandatory in all school corporations 
having twenty children working on certificates. 

5. The passage as a health measure of a law limiting the hours 
of employment for women. As the state now has no limit on the num- 
ber of hours women may work, except the limit on night work in manu- 
facturing plants, a nine-hour law would greatly improve present con- 
ditions. Table II indicates that 42.9 per cent of the women working 
outside of offices would be affected by a nine-hour law. 



13—22978 



194 



Year Book 




• 'Plants i>vtUt\tiL 



J. NVSTROM4CO.CHICACO 



o ft.ct vv3tte<L 



MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF CANNERIES 



Industrial Board 195 

REPORT ON CANNERIES 

*1922 

A survey of the canning factories of Indiana was begun August 23d 
and finished October 5th. The investigation covered 164 equipped plants. 
Eleven of these were closed during the 1922 season and part had not 
operated for one or two previous years. It was impossible to obtain 
authoritative data for 12 others closed at the time of inspection. The 
remaining 141 canneries were made the basis of the following tables 
and discussions. A total of 6,132 males and 6,143 females were em- 
ployed at the time of inspection. This may be considered as an average 
for the season, since about half of the plants were visited either before 
or after the rush and one-half during the capacity runs. 

Indiana ranks high in the list of canning states. Census figures for 
Indiana show that "Canned vegetables (apart from canned fruits, pickles, 
preserves and sauces) was the product of chief value in 1919 as in 1914, 
forming 51.7 per cent and 58.4 per cent, respectively, of the total value 
of products of the industry in the state. Measured by value, the most 
important products in 1919 were canned beans and canned tomatoes, 
forming 43.1 per cent and 16.9 per cent, respectively, of the total for 
vegetables. The total value of the industry increased $13,956,965, or 
100.7 per cent, during the five-year period 1914-1919." 

A statement given out by the United States Department of Agri- 
culture indicates that Indiana led all states this year in the production 
of tomatoes for canning and preserving, growing "in excess of 27 per 
cent of the entire tomato crop of the United States intended for use 
in manufacturing, and more than 50 per cent of the entire crop of 
tomatoes for manufacture in the United States last year. * * * 
Indiana's production this year almost equalled that of the two states 
next in rank. Among the largest tomato producing states and their 
yields for this year are: Indiana, 271,534 tons; California, 173,786 tons; 
Maryland, 111,510 tons; New Jersey, 81,398 tons; New York, 63,245 tons; 
Ohio, 56,847 tons; Missouri, 37,163 tons; Delaware, 31,712 tons; and 
Utah, 30,287 tons." 

On June 20, 1922, the United States Department of Agriculture 
issued estimates of the acreage of corn, peas, snap-beans, and tomatoes 
grown for canning in the various states. For tomatoes, Indiana ranked 
first with 52,175 acres; Maryland second with 43,629; New Jersey third 
with 28,217 acres; California fourth with 22,902 acres; and Ohio fifth 
with 11,756 acres. Indiana stands eighth in point of acreage for corn 
and eleventh for peas. Snap-beans in Indiana are of so little relative 
importance that they were not reported. 

Practically all canning in the state is done for wholesale trade, 
but a few plants cater to local families and do what is called custom 
canning. There are about five of these small firms in the central part 
of the state. Madison County seems to be the center of this phase of 
the industry. Customers are required to string and snap all beans 
brought to be canned, but all other vegetables and fruits are prepared 

*Data for this report were collected by Miss Sarah Louise Proctor and Miss Edith 
Venn. The report was written by Miss Proctor. 



196 Year Book 

at the cannery. The factory furnishes the cans and charges from 6 
to 10 cents per can. 

Indiana plants put up a variety of foods, with tomatoes, beans, corn, 
hominey and peas leading in value and amount. Other products are 
pumpkin and squash, kraut, red kidney beans, green beans, preserves, 
soups, beets, milk, lima beans, syrup and molasses, olives, berries, 
apples, cherries, pimentos, peaches, spaghetti, spinach, sweet potatoes, 
okra, meat sauce, peanut butter, salad dressing. 

In a normal year, peas, the first crop of the season, are ready for 
the cannery about the middle of June. String beans are matured for 
snapping the last of June, but some varieties are canned even as late 
as September. Corn is usually marketable during the month of August. 
Tomatoes ripen from about the middle or last of August until the frost 
kills the plants. This year the tomato season extended through the 
first weeks of October. Kraut, hominy and pumpkin are the late fall 
products and only a few plants have equipment for their canning. Prac- 
tically all shelled beans are shipped in from Michigan. Quite a few 
plants have overcome the highly seasonal character of the canning in- 
dustry by utilizing off seasons for the canning of pork and beans, salad 
dressing, pickles, peanut butter, chocolate, preserves, soup, hominy and 
catsup. The latter is made from pulp canned during August and Sep- 
tember. Thirteen of the plants visited operate all the year, one being 
the largest canning factory in the state. 

According to the 1919 census of manufactures, Indiana was fifth in 
kraut production. The state canned $828,073 worth of hominy, or 64 
per cent of the whole crop. It likewise put up 22 per cent of the baked 
beans canned in the United States and 1,908,101 more cans than any 
other state; the crop being valued at $6,720,466. The state canned 30.9 
per cent of all beans other than baked or string bean's, at a value of 
$357,534. In addition, the state led in the canning of pumpkin, with 
30 per cent of the total output, which was valued at $247,755. 

The canneries are grouped in a few counties, Madison County lead- 
ing with 12 plants; Delaware, 10; Henry and Jackson, 7 each; and John- 
son, Hamilton and Clark, 5 each. The other 90 plants are scattered 
through 56 counties, '29 counties only in the state having no canneries. 
The crop in the northern part of the state is shorter than in the south- 
ern since the season there begins one to two weeks later and is ended 
earlier by frost. The main crop canned in the southern counties is 
tomatoes, though some kraut and pumpkin are put up in the late fall. 

Tomato paste is a relatively new product. According to the 1919 
census of manufactures Indiana ranked third in its production, putting 
up 33,322 cases, valued at $358,592. However, only three plants were 
found manufacturing the paste at the time the survey was made. It 
is canned in 6-ounce cans and shipped by one corporation to New York 
and Boston, and by another to Chicago and New Orleans. At first only 
Italian dealers handled it for spaghetti sauce, but now its use is more 
general. 

Some plants were growing their own crop, or a part of it, although 
in most instances vegetables were contracted for with the farmer. Each 
fall the acreage, planting time, kind of seed, and delivery price are 
agreed upon between the canner's field man and the farmers. 



Industrial Board 197 

When the crop is ready to be delivered at the cannery it must be 
hauled in according to the few regulations that have been adopted. 
Since corn is at the proper milk stage for but one or two days its 
delivery is especially supervised. It cannot be brought to the canning- 
factory until the field man has called at the farm, tested the corn and 
pronounced it ready for hauling! It must then be delivered at the time 
specified by him. This is a precaution taken to prevent the growers 
from "dumping" corn that is too old for canning. In addition to this, 
practically all plants, regardless of what they are canning, refuse to 
accept loads after Saturday noon. With this precaution rigidly en- 
forced except for extremely unusual conditions, Sunday canning has 
become almost a thing of the past. There is a third form of restricted 
delivery. In very good seasons, such as the one just closed, some of 
the canneries contract for more product than they can handle. In such 
cases the usual procedure is to accept a certain percentage of each 
farmer's acreage. 

Early in a survey of this kind one learns to pick out the canneries 
upon approaching the small towns. Almost without exception they are 
to be discovered by means of their tall, thin, black smoke stacks. Usu- 
ally there is but one stack, although the larger plants sometimes have 
two. The smell of cooking tomatoes and the sight of wagons heavily 
loaded with products for canning are likewise guides in locating the 
factories. In some towns the arrival of the wagons is the signal to 
employes that the plant is about to open up for the day. The canneries 
are usually alongside the railroad and at the very outskirts of the town 
and on streams wherever possible. One was found adjoining a grave- 
yard. 

In the central and northern parts of the state canneries are in gen- 
eral substantially housed. As most of them handle more than one crop 
and thirteen operate throughout the year, it pays them to erect good 
buildings. The factories occupied by the bigger corporations are, in 
most cases, large, well-built and attractive. A few have even beauti- 
fied their grounds with flowers and shrubbery. As the firms in the 
southern part of the state confine themselves principally to the one 
crop, tomatoes, and but three or four operate more than a few weeks 
each summer, it is not surprising that they spend but little on buildings. 
The plants in this section are in general smaller and not so well con- 
structed as those in the central and northern parts of the state. One 
plant consisted only of a cement floor covered over with a roof, a port- 
able engine being used for power. In some places old barns and store- 
rooms had been utilized for canneries. Where new structures had been 
erected they were almost invariably one or one and a half story build- 
ings. In more than one instance the canneries were found away from 
any railroad or town, located in the country, in the heart of a cornfield. 

Five or six of the plants visited might be termed "family affairs." 
They were quite small, often did custom canning, and had only mem- 
bers of the family employed. In some localities the labor supply was 
scarce and in others very abundant. As most of the canneries are in 
rural communities there was the problem of getting the country people 
to the plants. In many places the firms ran buses which took the 



198 Year Book 

employes to and from work. Where this was not done farmers who 
worked in the plants and owned automobiles were often paid by the 
canners for bringing their neighbors to work in the morning and taking 
them home at night. 

With the exception of about 590 employed in the plants operating 
all the year, the women found in the canneries were in most cases house- 
keepers unacquainted with the hard routine of factory work. Women 
who live in the vicinity of a cannery usually look forward to the pack, 
for it is then that they earn money for themselves and for the pur- 
chase of books and clothing needed by the children of school age. Since 
these women are housekeepers, many of their domestic duties do not 
cease when they enter industry. With the housework necessarily wait- 
ing to be done and unexpected demands arising in their homes, they are 
a somewhat uncertain supply of labor. In an endeavor to devise some 
means whereby they could count on the women, the plants offered vari- 
ous kinds of bonuses. In one locality where the population was small 
and the canning factories numerous, labor was so scarce that the fac- 
tory paid each woman one dollar in addition to the regular piece rate, 
the dollar being no less than a gift in recognition of her presence. One 
firm paid a bonus of five dollars to women working four-fifths of the 
time that the plant operated, including Saturdays. Another type of 
reward was offered in an effort to keep peelers from being wasteful. 
Each bucket of tomatoes was weighed before and after peeling and a 
bonus given if the bucket weighed over a prescribed amount. This 
seems rather a risky way to save product, for the tomatoes might be 
saved at the expense of quality, 'since the temptation to throw in in- 
ferior ones would be great. In but few cases did the bonus bring the 
desired result. 

The 141 plants in the survey employed 6,132 males and 6,143 fe- 
males, ranging in age from 6 to 70 years. The males include 5,716 men, 
277 boys between 16 and 18, and 139 boys between 14 and 16 years of 
age. The females included 5,419 women, 409 girls between 16 and 18, 
and 315 between 14 and 16 years of age. In addition to these, 27 chil- 
dren under 14 years of age were employed. At least 35 of the plants 
employed no one under 18 years of age and 3 employed no women. 
There were nearly twice as many girls as boys. This can doubtless be 
explained by the fact that girls make better peelers than boys, who are 
not attracted to this type of work. There are few other jobs in a can- 
nery for young persons. 

Men employes were found working in the engine rooms, trucking, 
stacking cans in the warerooms, unloading cans from boxcars, and 
operating various machines, such as cappers, fillers, and bottle-washers. 
Boys between 16 and 18 were chiefly engaged in the very heavy work 
of trucking crates loaded with filled cans. Unless a boy is quite strong 
this work might easily give rise to severe strain having very serious 
results. Boys and girls as young as 6, 7, 9 and 10 years were found 
husking corn, peeling tomatoes and snapping beans. Women and girls 
worked on peeling and sorting tables, operated machines, and dropped 
down empty cans. Except for engine-room work and trucking, the dif- 
ferent types of jobs were not limited to either sex. 



Industrial Board 199 

Can shooters or droppers, as they are often called, were usually to 
be found in little lofts above the general work rooms. This work con- 
sists merely in keeping- a steady flow of cans on a chute leading down 
to the filling machine. Some plants employed old men or women, 
others boys or girls, or boys and girls together, on this job. In all 
cases where girls were found so employed alone or with boys their 
removal to other employment was recommended, or the placing of al 
least one older girl or woman on the work with them. These lofts were 
undesirable places for girls to work and were often almost unbearably 
hot and occasionally hard to reach. To the intense summer heat of 
an attic was added the damp, suffocating heat which arose from the 
workrooms. In two plants the can rooms were almost inaccessible, 
being approached only by ladders. Other canning factory jobs scarcely 
advisable for women are stacking cans alone in warerooms and unload- 
ing cans from boxcars. 

The processes in canning are exceedingly interesting. Only a brief 
sketch of them can be given here. As the survey was begun the last 
of August, no pea canneries were observed in operation. One of the 
principal machines used in this process is the sorter, a huge metal 
cylinder which revolves horizontally. The cylinder is full of holes which 
are graduated so that the peas of various sizes drop out in their re- 
spective places. This is really automatic grading. 

There is no particular machinery used in canning string beans, as 
they are prepared by hand and then cooked and sealed as is any other 
vegetable. 

The canning of corn does involve machinery. The first process, 
husking, is still done by hand in some of the plants. Men, women and 
children were found bent over on wooden crates shucking as fast as it 
was humanly possible, since their earnings were gaged by the number 
of crates husked. Where the corn is automatically husked it is carried 
to the top of the shed by large conveyor belts, allowed to slide down 
to the machines and then hand fed into them ear by ear. The knives 
on these machines cut off the ends of the husks. The ears then fall 
onto revolving knived rollers, which catch and quickly rip off the husks. 
Conveyor belts carry the corn along sorting tables, where women pick 
out imperfect ears and trim off bad parts. It is then washed, cut off 
by machine, silked by a revolving cylinder similar to the pea grader, 
mixed with a hot syrup of sugar and water, put in cans, steamed, 
cooked, and carried to the warerooms either by truck or automatic con- 
veyor. A peculiar utilization of a waste product of this work is that of 
gathering the cornsilk dropped by the huskers. In two plants adults 
were found supervising children ' in sacking the silk, which had been 
contracted for by a large drug firm for the medicinal properties that 
could be extracted. 

One general routing or procedure is followed in all plants where 
tomatoes are canned. On an outside platform all the crates or baskets 
of tomatoes are dumped into a large tank of water from which the 
tomatoes are carried by means of slat belts into a second washing 
device, usually a revolving cylinder having a spray at the top which 
thoroughly washes the tomatoes as they are tumbled forcibly over and 



200 Year Book 

over. They are next carried by belt along the sorting table, where all 
inferior tomatoes are removed before they reach the peelers. Ten or 
twelve types of peeling tables are in use. Each has its points of ad- 
vantage and disadvantage, chief of the latter being the leaking of 
water and crushed tomato. A favorite type of rotary table is well 
named the merry-go-round. The peeled tomatoes may either be dropped 
directly onto the moving belt or carried off in buckets. In either case 
they are pressed into the cans by hand, carried through a steamer, 
automatically capped, stacked into process rings, trucked to the cooking 
room, and swung by means of overhead pulleys into huge steam pres- 
sure cookers or retorts. After being cooked they are cooled in large 
kettles of cold water and then trucked to the wareroom. 

Various kinds of buckets were used in handling tomatoes. Granite 
buckets were used for peeled tomatoes only when very new since chips 
of granite would greatly endanger canned goods. Fiber buckets which 
successfully resist the acid of tomatoes soon become insanitary as a 
result of the fermentation occurring in the angle at the sides and bot- 
tom of the pail. Each season is begun with new buckets of this type. 
There is a third kind that permits of more than one season's wear. 
This is a galvanized iron bucket which has been given three or four 
coats of hard enamel paint. The enamel serves to resist the chemical 
action of the tomato on the iron. 

Quite often in canning, only the largest and most perfect tomatoes 
are peeled, ^ie rest being allowed to go into pulp. In catsup making 
no peeling is involved. Tomatoes are washed, sorted, crushed, run 
through some type of colander, cooked and seasoned, then bottled. The 
bottle washing and bottling machines are some of the most interesting 
used in the canning industry. 

There is a close resemblance between commercial kraut making and 
the home process. The cabbage is dumped by the grower into long, 
slanting bins in the shed. Boys there sort out the good heads and 
place them on a conveyor. The cabbage is then carried round and 
round by a rotary belt. Men with "hearters" core about every third 
head as it goes past them. A "hearter" looks something like the wheel 
type of egg-beater, only much larger and equipped with a revolving 
knife which cores the heads of cabbage much as a housewife cores apples. 
Women placed on the opposite sides of the belt cut away the exterior 
leaves of the cabbage. The heads thus closely trimmed are carried by 
conveyor to an upper floor where women press them against cylindrical 
knives. The resulting slaw-like mass is caught in containers resembling 
bath tubs and pushed down an overhead track to the vat where the 
kraut is to be cured. Here it is dumped and men with clean, shiny 
rubber boots tramp it down after distributing it with pitchforks. When 
the vat is full a large wooden cover is dropped in and weighted down 
with blocks of cement about a foot square. These replace grandmother's 
plate and stone. 

Pumpkin canning had not yet started when this survey was ter- 
minated, so it is impossible to give a sketch of the processes involved. 

Machinery in canneries, as in all other industries, has greatly 
lessened the labor involved. The conveyor belt is one of the most useful 



Industrial Board 201 

of labor-saving devices. Troughed floors so generally in use are a 
great aid to sanitation. They enable the workroom to dry off quickly 
after the frequent slushing of tables and floors. In an endeavor to 
decrease the number of minor cuts received, several plants have adopted 
sharp-edged spoons for peeling instead of the paring knives so long 
in vogue. Where merry-go-rounds- were in use bridge stairways and 
steps similar to the old-fashioned stile made it possible for the women 
to cross to the inner side of the tables. This stile type of stair some- 
times constituted a real accident hazard, since the steps were so often 
wet and slick with tomato peel and the procession of buckets necessi- 
tated quick stepping. 

The majority of plants were of open construction and in these 
there was no serious problem of lighting and ventilation and the others 
were in the main well lighted and ventilated. The fact that but two 
plants were filled with steam is the best proof that this condition is 
unnecessary in canning factories. The scalding and sorting of tomatoes 
on the unloading platform does much to relieve the main factory rooms 
of steam. 

Several plants were completely screened in an attempt to keep out 
flies. The effectiveness of this measure is greatly dependent upon the 
type of factory construction. In well-built, modern factories screening 
is most desirable, but in the temporary, open type of buildings screen- 
ing serves only to increase the annoyance, since it usually shuts in the 
flies. The ingenious arrangement used by one factory superintendent 
was effective. He had attached to the overhead lineshaft eighteen-inch 
paddle wheels which revolved with the shaft. This caused a constant 
current of air from above which freed the work tables of all flies. 

Wet floors are yet common to tomato factories. There are those 
who claim that it is impossible to have dry floors where tomatoes are 
being peeled, but as in the case of excessive steam the dry floors, re- 
peatedly found, are proof that the dampness is a bad condition which 
can be overcome. Permitting women to stand 8 to 13 hours a day and 
6 days a week on wet floors indicates a dangerous and unprofitable dis- 
regard of the health of workers and a lack of understanding of me- 
chanical construction. In one plant women were standing in one inch 
of water. It was not uncommon to find them wet to the ankles. The 
women themselves were partly to blame, since they were often care- 
less about dripping the wet tomatoes over the floor and their shoes. 
In the plants where the floors were dry the women seemed to take pride 
in keeping them so. 

Washing facilities for employes ranged in the different plants from 
porcelain bowls to iron sinks, hydrants, washpans, buckets and faucets 
over large tubs intended primarily for the washing of utensils. Of the 
141 plants, 53 provided no towels; 9 the roller type; 48 individual towels; 
12 kind not specified; and for 19 there was no information. There were 
44 firms which provided no soap; 13 liquid soap; 1 powdered; 66 kind 
not specified; and for 17 there was no information. The provision of 
soap in canning factories seems even more important than the provision 
of towels, though both are essential. Some employers object to indi- 
vidual towels because workers tend to be careless in disposing of the 



202 Year Book 

paper type and carry home cloth ones. The former objection can some- 
times be overcome by the provision of a sufficiently large container con- 
veniently placed and insistence on its use. If individual cloth towels are 
chained to a rod there is not much temptation to remove them. In 
order to overcome the waste and theft of soap 14 plants have adopted 
successfully either liquid or powdered soap. 

In spite of the preponderance of rural plants practically as many 
indoor as out-of-door toilets were found, though this was contrary to 
the expectation of the investigators. The indoor toilets were of two 
general type's: the modern porcelain flush type and flushed vaults. The 
latter were flushed by waste water from the canning process, by waste 
water from the lavatory or by the use of hose. The large number of 
orders (109) on toilets is indicative of the sanitary conditions. About 
two-thirds of the outside toilets were wire screened against fles. This 
sanitary precaution taken so generally by employers is worthy of adop- 
tion by other plants where open toilets are in use. 

Garbage disposal is quite a problem for the small rural canneries. 
Some plants distributed all refuse over fields for fertilizer, either keep- 
ing a team for this purpose or hiring farmers to dispose of it for them. 
Others dumped the refuse into large sunken cement tanks from which 
it was later hauled away. One of the most satisfactory means of 
getting rid of it was the use of septic tanks. 

Conditions in the plants were graded as follows: 

Excellent 1 

Good 49 

Fair 75 

Poor 11 

Plants closed 5 

Of the 141 concerns used as a basis for these statistics 15 received 
no orders and 6 needed only to be registered and licensed. Of the 21 
plants receiving no orders 2 had no violations, 11 were not operating 
at the time of the inspection, 6 employed no young people and 2 were 
small family affairs. The remaining 120 firms were issued 1,014 orders, 
or an average of 8 to a plant, 6 of the 120 receiving but one order. The 
largest number of orders issued to any firm was 22. The orders and 
recommendations are itemized as follows: 

Under legal working age 12 

No certificates 14-16 years 84 

No certificates 16-18 years 170 

Hours : Girls 14-18, boys 14-16 116 

Time records 25 

Women after 10 p. m 7 

Postings 123 

Prohibited occupations 2 

Constant standing — girls under 18 years 25 

Resting seats 53 

Operatives chairs 35 

Return certificates for correction 21 

Exchange certificates 13 

Return certificates to minors no longer employed 19 

Young children about factory 14 

Toilet and washing facilities 109 

Individual towels . . , 16 



Industrial Board 203 

Wet floors 16 

Rest room 1 

Improved ventilation 1 

Replace ladder with stairway 1 

Hand rail 1 

Repairing for safety 9 

Screen stairway 3 

Excessive steam 2 

Improved 'drinking facilities 7 

Register and license 39 

Warnings 90 

The above table shows that 84 orders were issued on certificates 
for boys and girls between 14 and 16 years and 170 for boys and girls 
between 16 and 18 years of age. This would indicate that employers 
are more careless in the employment of young persons between 16 and 
18 than of those between 14 and 16 years. 

The hours worked in a canning factory are difficult to discuss, since 
they are so variable, differing by day, by week, and by plant. The 
canner handles a product that is highly perishable and of great im- 
portance to the food supply of the consuming public. It must be cared 
for and not allowed to spoil. Little attempt seems to have been made 
by canners to overcome this situation than by overtime of the regular 
day force. The stated schedule of hours in a plant does not always 
indicate the actual hours worked, as excessive and irregular overtime 
often warps the schedule beyond recognition. 

The opening hours of the canneries varied in different localities 
except early in the season, when plants all over the state remained 
closed until 10 o'clock in the morning or even until afternoon. In the 
northern part of the state the general tendency was, except on very 
busy days, to start operating about 8 or 9 in the morning; in the south- 
ern counties most of the plants opened at 6:30 or 7 o'clock. Since so 
many women refused to come to work until after their washings were 
done, a great many factories did not resume operation on Mondays until 
afternoon. During the canning season of 6 to 8 weeks there is usually 
not more than 3 weeks of steady operation; at this time, however, the 
plants are certain to make up in overtime the hours lost during the 
earlier weeks. The general tendency seemed to be to have one-hour 
noon period, though there were several plants having but one-half hour 
and some allowing one and one-half hours. The latter believed the 
longer period to be important, since it gave the housewife time to go 
home, prepare the family meal, rest a bit, and return without being 
hurried. 

One of the most frequent causes of overtime is climatic changes. 
Several days of hard rain can render picking almost impossible. The 
extra heavy delivery of consequent accumulated pickings by all growers 
at about the same time can quickly "swamp" a plant until nothing ex- 
cept long hours or a greatly increased force can save the product. In 
like manner a hot spell may ripen a crop much more quickly than the 
canning .factory is normally able to care for it. In the middle of the 
ripening season it was no uncommon sight to see twelve to fifteen 
wagons lined up waiting their turn to be weighed. Poor planting man- 
agement is likewise a frequent cause of overtime. Too many acres may 



204 Year Book 

have been contracted for or too many acres planted at the same time, 
either resulting in an influx at the cannery. There is one phase of 
delivery resulting in rush work that the field man cannot govern; namely, 
the early maturity due to soil conditions of the product which was 
scheduled to ripen at a later date. 

All canneries are subject to frequent breakdowns. They operate 
such short seasons that the machinery often deteriorates greatly during 
the closed period. Of course precautions are taken against this at the 
close of the season and everything is gone over again just before the 
canning season opens. In spite of this, breakdowns of a more or less 
serious nature occur practically every day in the majority of plants. 
Some of this might be prevented if the repair work were not delayed 
until the actual opening of the pack, when it must be rushed through 
in any way possible. One plant had yet to drill a well when the growers 
were unloading tomatoes on the platform. With managers employed 
for the year it seems as if more and earlier repairing might be done, 
thus greatly reducing the number of breakdowns and resulting over- 
time. 

The personal equation is another cause of overtime. Because most 
workers in canning factories are only temporarily employed or else 
are casual workers, they sometimes fail even when most needed to 
recognize the economic necessity or moral obligation of sticking to the 
job. A good example of this irresponsibility occurred the day before 
one of our investigators was in the plant. So many tomatoes were 
crowded about the factory that the manager was beside himself. In 
spite of this, there being a Sunday school picnic in town, no employes 
appeared at the factory, all going to the picnic and taking a full holiday. 

The subject of overtime would not be complete without the men- 
tion of the scarcity of or delay in the delivery of cans. Sometimes 
plants have to close down for one to two days on account of this short- 
age. Naturally, then, when operation is resumed long hours are put 
in in a desperate effort to save the product that has been heaped up 
during the delay. One company supplies a large proportion of the 
cans used in Indiana. During the busy season, which lasts from May 
until October, it produces on the average 1,000,000 cans a day, The 
wareroom at present utilized by this company holds about 10,000,000 
cans, a very small portion of the year's output. Contrary to the lay- 
man's general idea, it has been found practically impossible to over- 
come the seasonal phase of this production. If approximately one- 
twelfth of the year's supply were manufactured each month an im- 
mense warehouse would be required for storage. Officials say that the 
resulting benefits would not warrant the capital expended. Up to the 
present time it has been impossible, and in some cases even unwise, to 
induce canners to buy cans six months to a year in advance. Indi- 
vidual canneries have but little storage space. Their warerooms will 
hold but a small part of the cans used during the pack. It is ques- 
tionable whether it would pay them even to store their warehouses full 
in advance of the canning season, for there is great danger of cans 
rusting in unheated or leaky warerooms. In addition to this the can- 
ning industry is so dependent upon climatic conditions that a whole 



Industrial Board 205 

crop can be destroyed almost overnight by frost, rain, wind, heat, etc. 
A canner might have laid in a large supply of cans and then have noth- 
ing to put in them. The can company, in order to protect the canner 
from this condition and at the same time get out as much production 
in advance as is possible, sometimes fills a canner's warehouse with cans 
in advance of the season. These remain the property of the can com- 
pany until the first day of the pack, when they are paid for. 

In the plants visited there was much overtime. Women worked 
long hours but were outstripped by the men, who were forced to remain 
even longer. In cases of shutdown the women were often permitted to 
go home if it was clear that the plant was to be closed for several 
hours; the men and boys, however, were almost invariably busied with 
odd jobs about the plant. "When the pack necessitated night work the' 
women ordinarily stayed on until 9 or 10 o'clock, the men remaining 
until any hour required to finish the day's run. In addition to this 
there was always the cleaning up, which took still more time. In can- 
ning tomatoes the men ordinarily turned all the remaining tomatoes into 
pulp after the women peelers were dismissed at night. Superintendents 
and foremen sometimes worked two or three days and nights at a 
stretch without any rest. 

In Tables IV and V the daily hours show average days during the 
heavy pack and the weekly hours are a compilation of the long and 
short days during the rush season, with overtime counted in wherever 
it was obtainable. 

Reference to Table IV will prove the statement that the hours of 
women in the canning industry are long. In the majority of plants 
women worked until 9 and 10 o'clock at night for two or three nights 
out of the week during the rush season. This meant that a woman 
worked a 9- or 10-hour day and then 2 or 3 additional hours at night, 
this very long day being repeated two or three times each week. Fatigue 
caused by such long hours cannot be overcome by a night's rest. Con- 
sider, then, the ultimate physical condition of the average canning fac- 
tory woman worker who must, upon reaching home, and before she can 
snatch a few hours of sleep, perform the domestic duties that her 
family were unable to perform without her. 

Of the total number of women in canneries, 47 per cent worked 10 
hours per day, 64 per cent of these working 10 hours per day and 60 
hours per week. The longest hours reported were those of one firm 
employing 34 women for over 13 hours a day and 80 to 82 hours per 
week. Another firm had 164 women working 13 hours a day and 78 to 
80 hours a week; 75 women worked 13 hours a day and 74 to 76 hours 
per week; 38 worked over 12 hours a day and 74 to 76 hours per 
week; 123 worked 13 hours a day and 64 to 66 hours per week. 

Sunday work occurred on but one or two occasions in as many 
plants. It was an emergency measure and only adults were employed. 
Most plants worked long and hard on Saturdays, since growers picked 
closely in order to avoid Sunday spoilage and consequently hauled in 
more than the ordinary day's supply. The larger plants in or near the 
cities usually arranged not to have Saturday afternoon work except 
during the very busiest two or three weeks. This move was necessi- 



206 



Year Book 



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Industrial Board 



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208 Year Book 

tated by employes who demanded the half-holiday. Six of the 141 
plants permitted women to work after 10 o'clock at night. One of 
these sometimes worked 6 women as late as 11 and 11:30. In a second 
plant 15 women worked one 10-hour night shift. In a third, 2 women 
on two occasions worked a 10-hour night shift. In a fourth, 12 women 
worked until 11 o'clock one night. In a fifth, 4 women worked a night 
shift one night. And in a sixth, 6 women on one occasion worked all 
day and all night; 20 women worked one night shift, and 38 worked 
until after midnight several times. 

Since the Indiana child labor law considers boys over 16 years of 
age as adults with no limitation of hours, we found boys between 16 
and 18 years of age working the same hourly schedules as men, that 
is, from 9 to 13 and 14% hours a day and from 54 to 81 hours per 
week, hours which are a tax on adult men, and certainly a dangerous 
tax on the strength of immature boys. 

The law limits the hours of boys between 14 and 16 years and girls 
between 14 and 18 years of age to 8 hours a day and 48 hours a week. 
Table V gives the hourly schedules worked by young persons of these 
ages. Some of the long hours are startling violations. 

It will be noticed that one boy under 16 years of age worked as 
long as 13% hours per day and 81 hours per week. A girl between 
16 and 18 years of age worked 12 hours a day and between 70 and 72 
hours per week; 3 girls between 16 and 18 years were employed 11 hours 
some days and from 48 to 50 hours per week; 21 boys and girls under 
16 years worked over 10 hours a day and between 54 and 56 hours per 
week; 30 girls between 16 and 18 years and 4 boys and girls between 14 
and 16 years worked 10 hours per day and 60 to 62 hours per week. 

The hours of labor notice, register and roster, postings required 
by the law for boys between 14 and 16 and girls between 14 and 18 
years, were found in but about half of the plants. Although these 
forms have been required since 1899, some employers still claimed that 
they knew nothing about them. Others tried to excuse themselves on 
the grounds that the rush of the pack had resulted in their neglecting 
either to fill out the forms or to secure them. 

Since the majority of women and children in the canning factories 
were employed on piecework, production records and not time records 
were usually kept. In the absence of time records, except for day 
workers, it was necessary to take the children's statements as to their 
hours. One six-year-old boy, being questioned as to his hours, replied: 
"I don't know how long I do work a day, but I shucked corn till I wore 
the seat of my pants out." An addition to our collection of types of 
time records. Actual time records should be kept of all young persons 
whose hours are limited by law. Very few of the plants paid any 
additional wage for overtime, even when it was work extending far into 
the night. Of the 128 firms for which information was available, 28 
per cent paid all their employes on a piecework basis, while 23 per 
cent paid all workers on a day rate. In the remaining plants part of 
the workers were paid on piece rate and part on day rate. 

It was impossible to go through the canneries without being im- 
pressed by the large number of old women working there. At first 



Industrial Board 209 

thought it seemed a pity that women of such advanced years should be 
employed. On the other hand, they were simply performing some of 
the domestic work that women have been accustomed to doing in their 
homes. The peeling or sorting of tomatoes, the husking or sorting of 
corn, and the trimming of cabbage are jobs which they normally enjoy. 
The old women of the type found in the canning factories are depend- 
ent usually in their old age, consequently they welcome this oppor- 
tunity of earning money. It is better to aid these needy old people 
than to employ children when there is no actual need for their earn- 
ings, depriving them of their play and often of the schooling which is 
their right. 

On the whole, the women in the canneries looked clean. They wore 
nondescript aprons of newspaper, sacks, oilcloth, or gingham. Only six 
plants furnished uniforms. One of these provided the goods and the 
women made the aprons. One of the plants shared the expense of 
buying and laundering all uniforms. One issued fresh white caps and 
aprons twice a week and attended to their laundry. One furnished 
and laundered the aprons of all salaried help of the regular force of 
employes and of all temporary help. One laundered the uniforms which 
it had enabled its employes to buy at cost. The sixth firm furnished 
rubber aprons and rubber boots. 

With the colored people in Indiana numbering 80,810, or 2.8 per 
cent of the population in 1920, it is timely that a study be made to 
see what industries are using their services. Since so many of the 
colored men and women in the state are primarily employed in domestic 
work, it seems surprising that so few were employed in the canning 
factories. The small number of colored men worked either on the heavy 
odd jobs around the plants or on the peeling and sorting of tomatoes. 
Only eight plants employed colored women and young persons under 
18 years of age. These plants employed 70 colored women and 35 col- 
ored children on the peeling of tomatoes. Their hours were the same 
as corresponding groups of white employes and they received the same 
piece rate. In each case the colored women worked a little apart from 
the others. In all but one plant, and that in the extreme southern 
part of the state, both groups used the same dressing and toilet rooms. 
Wherever the question was raised we were told that the colored women 
made splendid workers. One canner stated that he hoped to employ 
colored women each season, as they had proved to be more reliable than 
the white women. ' 

The large number of young children who sought jobs or else came 
to the plants with their mothers constituted one of the many vexing 
problems of the canning factory. manager. The youngest child seen in 
the canneries by the investigators was a tiny baby in a cab beside its 
mother, who was engaged in shooting down cans. The women brought 
the children to the plants because they had no one at home with whom 
to leave them. Since children playing about factories are liable to meet 
with accidents, employers are coming more and more to bar them from 
their premises. However, they take this stand with great hesitation, 
for mothers frequently take offense and do not return to work, and in 
the stress of the pack canners cannot afford to lose the services of 

14—22978 



210 Year Book 

experienced women. So serious is the matter that last year one plant en- 
gaged a woman to devote her whole time to amusing and looking after 
the small children of its employed women. This plan worked splen- 
didly as long as the payroll was large, but toward the end of the 
season the expense did not warrant retaining the worker. Another 
plant was considering the maintenance of a nursery during next year's 
pack. 

Only four women executives were found. Disappointing as it is, 
these women, with but one exception, seemed not to understand the 
child labor law any more than the men. If they understood the law 
and were willfully permitting violations their attitude is even more to 
be lamented. 

The common belief that there are few if any accident hazards in 
canneries was disproved during this survey. One boy was killed this 
season while at work in the cooking room. While one of the investi- 
gators was making an inspection a steam pipe burst and threw a man 
who was working near it down from the top of the room. Six acci- 
dents in canning factories were reported to the department in one day. 
These consisted of cuts, scalds, and accidents caused by slipping on 
wet floors and stairs. In view of this it is well that employers keep 
in mind the fact that when the injured is illegally employed, compen- 
sation insurance is not awarded and the employer is liable for damages 
under the common law. Many employers are failing to use the clause 
of the law which is particularly for their protection, namely, the pro- 
vision requiring school officials to issue certificates to young persons 
up to 21 years of age if requested to do so by the employer. Since 
many minors give an incorrect age, this section of the law should be 
of great importance to employers. 

The matter of proper seating is of vital consequence to all indus- 
tries. Investigation revealed that canners had given it even less thought 
than other manufacturers. Because their season is relatively short they 
seemed to think that the men, women and children whom they em- 
ployed could be worked down to the last bit of energy and left to 
recuperate when the pack was over. But if expended human energy 
is not replaced within the cycle of 24 hours lowered vitality results. 
Continued strain is certain to tell on health. It is scarcely necessary to 
say that women working 10 to 13 Vz hours a day in the canneries must 
gradually be sapped of their strength. The natural reaction to im- 
paired energy is reduced production and inferior work. The fatigue 
brought on by long hours is aggravated and increased either by con- 
stant standing or poor seating. At least two-thirds of the women em- 
ployed in the canneries were standing at their work. About one-third 
of these had no resting seats of any kind. There were 53 orders issued 
on resting seats and standard operatives' chairs were recommended in 
35 cases. With no thought as to the health of young employes, 25 
plants were permitting girls under 18 years of age to stand constantly 
at their work. Crates, boxes, barrels, benches, some few chairs, and 
stools of uniform height took the place of resting seats and operatives' 
chairs. Very few footrests were in evidence and in many places ob- 
structions interfering with the knees made sitting at work practically 



Industrial Board 211 

impossible. Many managers insisted that women could not profitably 
be seated while peeling tomatoes. On the other extreme was the plant 
that refused to permit them to stand at all. At least two plants per- 
mitted alternate sitting and standing, which is the desirable condition, 
and were reaping the rewards of scientific seating in increased and 
better production. One manager, convinced that the frequent trips for 
a drink, the stretching, and the much complained of backaches had a 
cause that could be alleviated with profit to the management, changed 
the whole arrangement of the manufacturing process, built comfortable 
chairs with backs for its workers and seated those who had formerly 
been required to stand. The management would not now even consider 
going back to the old way. 

Bulletin No. 1 of the Industrial Welfare Commission of California, 
in a 1917 report on the canning industry of California, says: "It 
usually has been assumed that seating is either a simple affair, easily 
solved, or that the innate perverseness of human beings made them 
insistent on standing almost continuously even when seats were freely 
provided. The fallacy of these opinions was clearly demonstrated by 
most of the canneries studied; in some, where the use of seats was 
apparently disdained, inspection disclosed that there were either definite 
physical obstructions to comfortable sitting or that some necessary 
motion became difficult when seated. 

"At the tomato peeling and sorting benches a large proportion of 
the women were compelled to stand at their work. This is a condition 
for which there is little excuse, as ordinarily it is due primarily to the 
presence of obstructions under the belt; either bracing, which could be 
altered, or else the return of the belt which can be raised or depressed 
by means of idlers so that it can be guarded and proper clearance ob- 
tained either underneath it or above it. Many peelers stand as the 
seats available are so low that when peeling a tomato the hands are 
necessarily held higher than the elbows, and the resulting stream of 
tomato juice in the lap of the worker is a most effectual discourager. 

"The mere fact that many women have, for years, been working 
in a standing position, or seated on unhygienic seats, is no argument 
whatever for the continuation of such practices. The human body is 
generally capable of a most amazing amount of adjustment to condi- 
tions thrust upon it, but, sooner or later, these unnatural strains will 
result in more or less serious disabilities. There is abundant medical 
testimony as to the serious effects on women, of work in a standing or 
in an incorrect sitting position, and this would be more generally under- 
stood were it not for the fact that most of these ailments are of such 
a nature that the employer never hears of them, and many are such 
that their connection with the occupation is not suspected except by the 
physician. The employer has a perfectly natural tendency to remember 
clearly only those employes who, gifted with the strong constitution, 
successfully resist these occupational strains. 

"A seat for cannery use should be comfortable for all users, pro- 
duce a hygienic position, and not interfere in any way with the motions 
necessary on the part of the worker. It should, further, be adjustable, 
at least vertically; it should be durable, easily cleaned, and not cumber- 
some. 



212 Year Book 

"One of the most important and commonly neglected elements con- 
tributing to the comfort of a seat is the dimensions of the seat itself; 
this is frequently made far too narrow for the stocky types so often 
found in canneries, and it seems likely that seats should not be much, 
if any," narrower than 14 inches, with a minimum depth of 10 inches." 
A timely bulletin on industrial posture and seating, issued in 1921 
by the New York Department of Labor, enumerates the requirements 
of scientific seating as follows: "Though in each individual case the 
type of work to be done must determine the best arrangement for seat- 
ing, a general summary of the principles of correct seating would 
require a seat, broad and not too deep, slightly saddle shaped and with 
the front edge rounded; the feet resting comfortably on the floor or on 
a broad footrest attached to the floor or bench; the bench at a height 
to allow plenty of room for the knees between the top of the seat and 
the under side of the bench; no bracing or other obstruction interfer- 
ing with a comfortable position of the feet and legs; a backrest sup- 
porting the small of the back and not extending up far enough to 
interfere with free movement of the arms; supplies arranged so that 
no excessive reach is involved in the work. If an operator is able to 
rest herself by changing her position at work occasionally, a great deal 
of unnecessary fatigue can be avoided. For many operations, the thing 
to do is to begin by raising the bench high enough to allow the operator 
to work sitting or standing." 

This survey, which required about 28 "working days, was made 
possible by the co-operation of the Factory Inspection Department. The 
inspectors traveled by automobile and covered 4,489 miles. This does 
not include the mileage entailed in making detours, one of which was 
12% miles long; in getting on wrong roads; and in crossing cities to 
reach plants. As many as 636 miles were driven by an investigator in 
one week and 147 miles was the greatest distance driven in any one day. 
During that time from 2 to 4 inspections were made each day. On account 
of the illness of one of the men from the Factory Inspection Department 
who was driving a car, it was necessary to travel 377 miles by train 
and traction. The trip covering the southern counties included 14 
towns that were on neither railroad nor ti action lines. Thirty-four of 
the towns visited had very poor railroad accommodations, most of them 
having but one train a day each way. Without a machine it would 
have taken about 40 days to do these plants alone. Not only a 
great deal of time but a tremendous amount of the investigator's energy 
would have been expended and the cost of taxi hire would have been 
practically prohibitive. 

IN CONCLUSION 

The plants inspected were in fair sanitary condition. There was 
a general tendency to screen them against flies. Canners seemed to be 
striving for a clean, wholesome product. 

There is much accident prevention work yet to be accomplished in 
the canneries. When wet stairs and floors have been overcome the cause 
of the majority of the accidents will have been done away with. 

Employers generally seemed careless about employing girls between 
16 and 18 years without certificates and for unlimited hours. Many 



Industrial Board 213 

were chagrinned to find that some of their young employes had given 
incorrect ages and were much under 18 though claiming to be above. 
It is hoped, however, that employers will not use this as an excuse to 
discontinue employing young people, particularly girls between 16 and 
18 years of age. Work in the canning factories is relatively health- 
ful, in most instances is not monotonous, and being somewhat domestic 
in nature is of the type that young girls are adapted to and used to 
doing. It seems desirable then that their employment be continued in 
the canning factories, but that their hours of employment conform with 
the law. 

Though long, exhausting hours were the rule, there were notice- 
able efforts to standardize and shorten the day of the canning factory' 
employe. Five plants had operated at least one season on an 8-48 hour 
schedule for women and children and not over a 10-60 hour schedule 
for men. Another never permitted women to work longer than 9 
hours and men 10 hours. If the usual force of employes absolutely 
could not handle the day's work then a new shift was employed. With 
six plants having accomplished so much, it is not unreasonable to ex- 
pect at least a measure of restriction on overtime by the other plants. 

If canners restrict hours, intensive production must follow. The 
latter is an impossibility unless all unnecessary fatigue is overcome. 
As poor seating and posture is one of the main causes of fatigue, em- 
ployers must soon reach the point where proper seating will receive 
the consideration that it deserves in view of the fact that it results in 
increased production and a better grade of production. 

Understanding the many problems peculiar to the canning indus- 
try, the department has tried to be very fair with the canners. Al- 
though it is in no way incumbent upon the department to advise 
employers of the law, an especial effort has twice been made to acquaint 
employers operating canning factories with the provisions relating to 
them. On May 20, 1921, the following letter was mailed to every can- 
ning factory in the state: 

"The Industrial Board wishes to call to the especial attention 
of the canners of the state the importance of items 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 
11, 12 and 13 of the enclosed letter addressed to employers, and to 
suggest that the matter of securing authorized evidence of age pre- 
liminary to issuing certificates be taken up with your local school 
officials at once in order that all documentary evidence required be 
on file at the issuing office. 

If this is done there need be no delay in issuing certificates 
when the pack is ready, and thus avoid all unnecessary handicap 
to young persons wanting to work and to canners needing their 
services." 

On March 25, 1922, another letter, accompanied by a copy of the 
letter of the previous year, was addressed to canners: 

"The above letter was mailed to you before the opening of the 
canning season last year. 

Some acted upon the suggestion as to obtaining evidence of 
age of young persons and were thus able to secure the certificates 
required by law when the demand came for workers. 



214 Year Book 

Others violated the law either by employing young persons 
without certificates, or by accepting certificates which were very 
evidently incorrectly issued. 

In many rural communities the school official who issues cer- 
tificates is away during vacation time and just when canners are 
most in need of the services of an issuing officer. We advise that 
you see your local school official at once and ask him to arrange 
for someone else to issue certificates during vacation time if he 
expects to be away. 

The board having now called the attention of canners to this 
matter for their protection for a second time feels justified in stat- 
ing that the law will be enforced the coming season without favor." 

The general policy of the department was carried out with regard 
to the canners; that is, to give all plants a second chance before prose- 
cution is started. Canneries having a first violation on hours or cer- 
tificates were sent the following notice: Further violation will be suf- 
ficient cause for action by the Industrial Board of Indiana under the 
penalty clause of the law (Sec. 27). With but few exceptions employ- 
ers were extremely courteous in spite of the stress under which they 
were working. Some thanked the inspectors for suggestions and in- 
formation given. 

The number of plants visited during this survey could not pos- 
sibly have been reached during the short canner's season except by 
automobile. In addition to this, traveling by machine was much cheaper 
and quicker than by rail and enabled the inspectors to reach rural com- 
munities otherwise practically inaccessible. A further consideration is 
that inspection by car was much easier on the investigators than travel 
by rail would have been, since the latter would have involved the walk- 
ing of many blocks to plants lying on the outskirts of towns, the carry- 
ing of baggage, and the waiting of long hours on account of poor train 
connections. If inspection work is worth doing it is worth doing well, 
consequently it is important that the energy of the inspector be conserved 
for keen, careful observation. 



REPORT OF FEDERAL-STATE DIRECTOR OF THE FREE 
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE OF INDIANA 

THOMAS A. RILEY, Director. 

LUELLA COX, Superintendent Junior Guidance and Placement. 

BLANCH E. METZKER, Secretary. 

In completing its fiscal year on September 30, 1922, the department 
finished one of the most active years in its history. One year ago, the 
United States was face to face with the greatest industrial depression 
that the country had ever known. It was estimated that as many as 
five and one-half million of our workers were walking the streets look- 
ing for employment. It was the greatest horde of unemployed that 
ever burdened the nation. The U. S. and Indiana Free Employment 
Service had a great part in meeting it. 

This report covers the operation of the ten state free employment 
services, co-operating with the U. S. Employment Service, Department 



Industrial Board 



215 



of Labor, for the year of October 1, 1921, to September 30, 1922. The 
service is now operating in the following cities: Ft. Wayne, Evansville, 
Terre Haute, Lafayette, Hammond, East Chicago, Anderson and Ko- 
komo. The Indianapolis office was closed on July 19, 1922, on account 
of the failure of the city council to appropriate funds for the city's 
share of maintaining the placement office. The Muncie office was closed 
for the same reason February 20, 1922. Offices were established in the 
cities of East Chicago, Kokomo and Anderson on the respective dates 
of December 1, 1921; February 1, 1922, and March 1, 1922. Negoti- 
ations are on at the present time for the re-opening of the Indianapolis 
placement office. 



Name op Office 


Registrations 


Help Wanted 


Referred 


Placed 


Anderson (from March 1, 1922). 


623 

144 


994 

385 


664 
209 


627 




205 






East Chicago (from December 1, 1921) 


767 

643 
117 


1,379 

965 
69 


873 

313 
43 


832 
228 




35 






Evansville 


760 

1,536 
290 


1,034 

840 
116 


356 

864 
114 


263 
581 




56 






Ft. Wayne 


1,826 

9,694 
2,684 

12,378 

1,886 
153 


956 

9,037 
2,693 

11,730 

2,079 

76 


978 

8,293 
2,173 

10,466 

1,028 
81 


637 
7,719 




1,916 


Hammond 


9,635 

872 




80 






Indianapolis (to July 19, 1922) 


2,039 

7,663 
3,736 

11,399 

2,398 
323 


2,155 

12,814 
6,800 

19,614 

2,794 
599 


1,109 

12,380 
8,079 

20,459 

2,417 
609 


952 
11,031 




6,515 


Kokomo (from February 1, 1922) 


17,546 
2,050 




456 






LaFayette 


2,721 

1,112 

83 


3,393 

1,202 
65 

1,267 

363 
177 


3,026 

955 

28 


2,506 
890 




21 






Muncie (to February 20, 1922) 


1,195 

1,414 
446 


983 

293 
155 


911 
283 




155 






Terre Haute 


1,860 

4,199 
2,964 

7,163 


540 

3,508 
2,509 

6,017 


448 

3,615 

2,634 

6,249 


438 
3,270 




2,346 




5,616 




42, 108 


48,085 


44,947 


39,336 









RECAPITULATION 










31,168 
10,940 


34,596 
13,489 


30,822 
14, 125 


27,551 




11,785 







216 Year Book 

This year's report shows a gain of 62% over last year's registra- 
tions and a gain of 151% over last year's placements. 

EXPENDITURES 

Salaries $17,881 85 

General repairs 429 31 

Light, heat and water • . 259 79 

Travel expense 285 62 

Transportation 93 75 

Communication 524 79 

Miscellaneous 46 80 

Office supplies 242 21 

Gasoline 80 00 

Rent 1,234 50 

Total $21,078 64 

The beginning of this fiscal year finds a large majority of the five 
and one-half million of our workmen back to their legitimate places in 
shop, in factory, in mine, in mill and in quarry. We still have a million 
and a half seeking jobs, another million and a half are idle through 
so-called part time employment. Investigations made during the last 
year have demonstrated that this is the normal condition in America. 

This is the condition we must overcome. We have brought unem- 
ployment back to normal; now it is our task to assist in reducing what 
the experts would call the "norm." 

It is distinctly to the interest of the entire business community to 
keep workmen reasonably steadily employed at fair wages. It is good 
business; furthermore, it is good patriotism, for the busy, well-paid 
workman is a good citizen — the idle, needy workman a tool always 
sought by the economic and political quack who has false economic and 
political nostrums to peddle to the injury of the nation. Surely no 
greater duty rests on a state and city today than the prevention of a 
recurrence of the period of unemployment through which we have just 
passed and the elimination of that bulk of unemployment which investi- 
gation discloses we have always with us. 

The problem before us in reducing the normal unemployment prob- 
lem is two-fold. First, the placing of the million and a half who are 
seeking jobs; second, the elimination of the part-time evil which is 
keeping another million and a half idle on the average throughout the 
year. 

The U. S. and Indiana Free Employment Service is taking an essen- 
tial step towards the solution of this problem through a connected net- 
work of public employment offices. The aim of the service is a rapid 
connection between the "right man for the job and the right job for 
the man." Its watchword is efficient service to both employer and 
worker. The goal is to extend the service as completely as possible into 
all industries and occupations. 

Well arranged, roomy, easily accessible places are chosen for the 
location of the placement offices. These offices are in good neighbor- 
hoods and the offices are divided into separate departments for men 
and women. 

Daily reports are made by the local offices and weekly reports are 
made to the federal-state director's office at the State House, where 



Industrial Board 



217 



they are tabulated and a copy forwarded to the U. S. Employment 
Service, Department of Labor, Washington, D. C. 

Under an act concerning employment agencies, the state director 
has charge of fee-charging agencies. A bond of $1,000 is required and 
also an annual license fee of $25. Twenty- two licenses were issued 
this year. These offices are all located in the city of Indianapolis, with 
the exception of one at South Bend. 

v The following tables give a brief outline of the work done by the 
two junior employment offices which co-operate with the Indiana Free 
Employment Service. 

REPORT OF ACTIVITIES— JUNIOR EMPLOYMENT OFFICE— RICHMOND 



Sex 


Registered 


Help Wanted 


Referred 


Placed 


Under 
*16 


Over 
16 


Total 


Under 
16i 


Over 
16 


Total 


Under 
l 16. 


Over 
16 


Total 


In School 


In Positions 




Under 
16 


Over 
16 


Total 


Under 
16 


Over 
16 


Total 


Boys . 
Girls.. 


' 206 
161 


210 
258 


$416 
1 419 

835 


(96 

142 


134 

,158 
M 


230" 
200; 


|89 
IL42 


122 
122 


211 
164 


9 
11 


3 


10 
14 


120 
59 


132 
121 


252 
180 


Total . 


•430 


375 


24 


432 



























Placement Classifications 





Classification of Occupations 


Referred 


Placed 


Agriculture 






2 










41 
17 
18 
2 


44 


Domestic 




13 


and 
Personal 




19 




8 












3 
39 
36 

3 

"*2 

11 
6 


3 






52 






65 


ing and 




11 










2 






9 






1 












'"i 

25 
14 

56 

"i9" 








1 


Office 


Clerks r : 


21 






14 


Sales Work 




44 






5 






20 












5 
2 

""5 

69 

'"b 


7 
























6 






71 






4 












9 










Total 


382 


432 









Supplementary Information 



Registered for consultation only 60 

Asked about school 1 

Sent back to school 4 

Retained present positions 27 

Remained in school, but registered for "Out 
of School" jobs 7 



Old firms wanting help 8 

New firms wanting help 10 

Visits to employers 15 

Visits from employers 3 

Follow-up cases 4 



218 Year Book 

report of activities— junior employment office— south bend 





Registered 


Help Wanted 


Referred 


Placed 


Sex 


Under 
16 


Over 
16 


Total 


Under 
16 


Over 
16 


Total 


Under 
16 


Over 
16 


Total 


In School 


In Positions 




Under 
16 


Over 
16 


Total 


Under 
16 


Over 
16 


Total 


Boys . 
Girls.. 


235 
235 


412 
462 


647 
697 


94 

187 


387 
672 


481 
859 


124 

187 


300 
402 


424 
589 


20 

27 


1 
1 


21 

28 

49 


103 
145 


230 
313 


333 

458* 


Total 


1,344 


1,340 


1,013 


791 



























Placement Classifications 



Agriculture 



Classification of Occupations 



Farming, gardening, etc 

Housework in the home 

Nurse girls and attendants 

Waitresses and waiters 

Stockkeepers and checkers 

Packing and assembling 

Helpers and attendants 

Machine operators 

Laboratory workers 

Draftsmen 

Apprentices 

Inspectors 

Reed Workers 

Cash girls and bundle wrappers 

Cashiers 

Clerks 

Salesmen 

Typists and Stenographers 

Machine Operators 

Delivery. 

Messengers 

Office aides 

Trucking 

Chauffeurs and truck drivers. . . 
Laundry, cleaning and dyeing. . 

Laborers 

Milliners 

Core Makers 

Tutors 

Returned to school 

Total 



Referred 



22 



Placed 



24 



Domestic 

and 
Personal 



Manufactur- 
ing and 
Mechanical 



22 
70 
102 
118 



Office 

and 

Sales Work 



4 
106 



123 

1 

12 



81 

45 

102 

2 

7 



laneous 



1,027 



825 



Supplementary Information 



Number interviewed: 

(1) Boys and girls 7,363 

(2) Parents, employers and adults. .... 1 , 394 
Number of old firms seeking help...... 222 

Number of new firms seeking help 146 

Number registered for consultation 60 



(1) Those retaining present positions 11 

(2) Those sent back to school. 8 

Number of home visits made. 28 

Number of visits to employers 31 

Number of visits from employers 40 

Number of follow-up cases 243 



Industrial Board 219 

collateral activities of aid to junior work 

(a) Meetings with organizations of business men and employment managers, or with other organizations 
or institutions for purpose of stimulating community interest in junior placement. 

Industrial Relations Association 1 

Vocational Guidance Committee Meeting 3 

Boya' Committee of Rotary Club 1 

Interviews with principals and superintendents 3 

(b) Speeches made by staff members before organizations in interest of work. 

Talk before Rotary Club 

Talk before Chamber of Commerce 

Talk before Civic League 

Talk before South Bend Expansion Committee 

Talk before Senior boys 

Talk before Senior girls 

Talk before High School girls 

Talk before Principals' Meeting 

(c) Co-operation with public schools through: 

Visits to schools 10 

Visits to high schools 1 

Visits to part-time school 3 

Visits to vocational school 2 

Visits to Thomas Business College 1 

(d) Newapaper articles on Vocational Guidance 5 

(e) Interviewed at Washington School , 25 

(f ) Co-operation with employment department Chamber of Commerce 

(g) Newspaper advertising 



REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF BANKING 



OFFICERS AND EMPLOYES 

CHAS. W. CAMP, Bank Commissioner. 

WM. F. MORRIS, Chief Bank Examiner. 

ROBERT PRASS, Bank Examiner. 

LYMAN B. HOLLEMAN, Bank Examiner. 

THOS. D. BARR, Bank Examiner. 

CARL L, WHITE, Bank Examiner. 

FRED J. WHICKER, Bank Examiner. 

CHAS. J. DOWDEN, Bank Examiner. 

DON P. CARPENTER, Bank Examiner. 

THOS. M. BOSSON, Clerk. 

DOROTHY MURPHY, Clerk and Stenographer. 

BUILDING AND LOAN DEPARTMENT 

JAMES H. TOMLIN, Clerk. 

HENRY HOCH, Examiner. 

CHAS. F. HARPER, Examiner. 

VICTOR D. MOCK, Examiner. 

HELEN JOHNSON, Clerk and Stenographer. 

LOAN AND CREDIT DEPARTMENT 

ELMER JOHNSON, Clerk. 

CHARTER BOARD 

WARREN T. McCRAY, Governor. 

IZD JACKSON, Secretary of State. 

WM. G. OLIVER, Auditor of State. 

CHAS. W. CAMP, Secretary. 

DOROTHY MURPHY, Assistant Secretary. 

The Department of Banking came into existence on September 30, 
1920, and, under the act of March 7, 1919, took over from the Auditor 
of State the supervision of all state banks, private banks, savings banks 
and trust companies, building and loan associations, and all licensed 
lenders of money under what is known as the Loan and Credit act. 

BANK DEPARTMENT 

On September 15, 1922, there were in operation 512 state banks, 
175 trust companies, 154 private banks and 5 savings banks, with total 
assets of $554,189,151.69, showing an increase in assets of $20,280,296.95 
since the call in September, 1921. There was a net increase of ten new 
banks and trust companies during this period. 

During the fiscal year two state banks, one trust company and two 
private banks failed and were placed in receivership, as follows: 

(220) 



Department of Banking 



221 







Receiver 


Date Closed 






Clarence Bretsch 

Chas. W. Jewett 


Dec. 2, 1921 




Beech Grove 


April 20, 1922 




March 2, 1922 




Newburgh 

Elizabeth 


Eugene G. Sargent .... 
Wm. D. Barnes 


Oct. 17, 1921 




Mar. 1, 1922 









LOAN AND CREDIT DEPARTMENT 



This department has issued 260 licenses under the loan and credit 



act. 



An itemized list of licensees is submitted and made a part of this 
report. 

FISCAL AFFAIRS 

The three departments of the Department of Banking yielded a 
net profit to the state of $36,571.01, and had an unexpended balance of 
its appropriation amounting to $10,135.81. 

Attached to and made a part of this report will be found a de- 
tailed financial statement of the department, also information concern- 
ing the organization, reincorporation and liquidation of the banks and 
building and loan associations, and a list showing the resources of each 
bank, trust company and building and loan association at the close of 
the fiscal year. 

DUTIES OF BANK COMMISSIONER 

The bank commissioner has supervision of all state banks, private 
banks, trust companies, savings banks and mortgage guarantee com- 
panies doing business in the state. 

It is his duty to cause the same to be examined by regularly ap- 
pointed bank examiners as often as may be deemed necessary. If, in 
the examination of any bank or trust company, it develops that the 
same is in an insolvent or failing condition, or that the assets are 
being improperly used or converted, it becomes the duty of the bank 
commissioner to take charge of such institution and to make applica- 
tion to the circuit or superior court for a receiver. 

No regularly chartered state bank is under the supervision of the 
bank commissioner until it shall have received from the Secretary of 
State a certificate of authority to commence business. 

Regularly chartered trust companies incorporate in the office of the 
Secretary of State and receive a certificate from the bank commissioner 
to commence business when a certification has been made that the re- 
quired amount of capital has been paid in. 

Regularly chartered private banks receive a certificate of authority 
to commence business from the bank commissioner upon certification 
that the entire capital has been paid in. 

It is the duty of the bank commissioner to make at least five called 
reports each year of each state bank and trust company under his 
supervision. Also, at least two called reports of condition of each pri- 
vate bank, and annual reports from savings banks. 



222 Year Book 

financial statement— fiscal year ending september 30, 1922 



Bank Department — 

Examination fees $44,245 53 

Fees, filing bonds 1,827 00 

$46,072 53 

Building and Loan Department — Examination fees 19,338 00 

Loan and Credit Department — License fees 27,000 00 

Miscellaneous fees 69 78 

Expenses and Special Fees — 

Farmers Bank, Newburg $411 51 

Central State Bank, Gary 143 38 

554 89 

Total receipts $93,035 20 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Bank Department — 

Salaries $29,074 99 

Examiners' expenses 10,126 78 

$39,201 77 

Building and Loan Department — 

Salaries $9,700 00 

Examiners' expenses 3,171 52 

12,871 52 

Loan and Credit Department — 

Salaries $2,000 00 

Examiners' expenses 9 66 

2,009 66 

Printing and stationery 726 92 

Postage 250 00 

Contingent* 1,154 12 

Expenses and Special Fees — 

Farmers Bank, Newburg $200 15 

Central State Bank, Gary 53 38 

253 53 

Total disbursements $56,467 52 

Net receipts $36,567 68 

Appropriation fiscal year 1921-1922 $66,600 00 

Total expenses chargeable to appropriation 56,467 52 

Unexpended balance $10,132 48 

*Contingent — $686.40 of the contingent expense was paid to Wm. Atkins by order 
of the Industrial Board for injuries sustained while on duty as Building and Loan 
Examiner. 



Department of Banking 



223 



STATE banks 

Incorporated September 30, 1921, to September 30, 1922 



Name 


Location 


Capital 


Incorporated 


Began 
Business 






$25,000 
40,000 
50,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
50,000 
25,000 
35,000 
50,000 
50,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 

100,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 


Nov. 9, 1921 
Dec. 7, 1921 
May 8, 1919 
Dec. 7, 1921 
Oct. 7, 1921 
Jan. 18, 1922 
Dec. 23. 1921 
Jan. 18, 1922 
Feb. 1, 1922 
Feb. 2, 1922 
Mar. 3, 1922 
Mar. 10, 1922 
Aug. 17, 1921 
Apr. 5, 1922 
May 15,1922 
June 21,1922 
June 7, 1922 
July 5, 1922 
Aag 16, 1922 
Sept. 20,1922 
Sept. 11, 1922 


Nov. 14, 1921 


The State Bank of Lima 




Dec 15, 1921 






Dec. 21, 1921 






Jan. 3, 1922 






Jan. 3, 1922 






Jan. 24, 1922 




South Bend 


Jan. 3, 1922 




Lieters Ford 


Feb. 1, 1922 




Feb. 14, 1922 




East Chicago 


Mar 4, 1922 




Mar. 6, 1922 


Sixteenth Street State Bank 


Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 


Mar. 18, 1922 




Apr. 1, 1922 




May 13, 1922 




May 27,1922 
July 1, 1922 
July 1, 1922 
Aug. 1, 1922 
Sept. 5, 1922 
Sept. 23, 1922 












Mt. Summit 

Gwynneville 

Elizabeth 








Indianapolis 


Sept. 30, 1922 





State Banks Reincorporated 

State Bank of Warsaw, reincorporated as The State Bank of Warsaw, November 2, 1921. 

Sunman Bank, reincorporated as The Sunman State Bank, November 2, 1921. 

The Holton State Bank, reincorporated as Holton State Bank, November 2, 1921. 

Citizens State Bank, Bloomfield, reincorporated as The Citizens State Bank, February 1, 1922. 

Dillsboro State Bank, reincorporated as The Dillsboro State Bank, October 15, 1921. 

First State Bank, Bourbon, reincorporated as The First State Bank, March 31, 1922. 

Parke State Bank, Rockville, reincorporated as The Parke State Bank, April 19, 1922. 

The Farmers State Bank, Middletown, reincorporated as Farmers State Bank, May 17, 1922. 

Woodburn Banking Co., reincorporated as Woodburn State Bank, May 17, 1922. 

Mooreland State Bank, reincorporated as The Mooreland State Bank, August 16, 1922. 

The State Bank of Francesville, reincorporated as State Bank of Francesville, September 18, 1922. 

State Banks Liquidated 

Central State Bank, Gary, closed by department November 29, 1921, Clarence Bretsch appointed receiver 
December 2, 1921. 

Citizens State Bank, Dunkirk, closed by department January 26, 1922. Business taken over by First State 
Bank, Dunkirk. 

Beech Grove State Bank, Beech Grove, closed by department November 26, 1921, Chas. W. Jewett appointed 
receiver April 20, 1922. 

Name Changed— State Banks 

Peoples State Bank, Hammond, changed to Peoples Co-operative State Bank, November 21, 1921. 
Fodor & Busesky State Bank, South Bend, changed to Public State Bank, October 21, 1921. 
Public State Bank, South Bend, changed to Fodor State Bank, June 16, 1922. 
Gandy State Bank. South Whitley, changed to Mayer State Bank, September 30, 1922. 



224 



Year Book 



PRIVATE BANKS 
Received Certificates of Authority and Opened for Business September 30, 1921, to September 30, 192 



Name 


Location 


Capital 


Certificate 
of Authority 


Opened 


Switz City Bank 




$10,000 
10,000 


Oct. 20, 1921 
Aug. 1, 1922 


Nov. 12, 1921 






Aug. 5, 1922 







Private Banks Retired 

Farmers Bank Newburgh Closed October 17, 1921, E. G. Sargent, Receiver 

State Bank of Lima Howe Changed to State Bank, December 14, 1921. 

The Farmers Bank Scircleville Changed to State Bank, January 2, 1922. 

Vincennes Changed to State Bank, January 3, 1922. 



Bank of Lyons Lyoi 

Gosport Banking Co Gosport 

Leiters Ford Bank Leiters Ford . 

Salem Bank Goshen 

Citizens Bank Bicknell 

Elizabeth Bank Elizabeth 

Bank of Carthage Carthage. . . . 

New Paris Bank New Paris. . . 

Mt. Summit Bank Mt. Summit . 

Gwynneville Bank Gwynneville . 

Yorktown Banking Co Yorktown . . . 



.Changed to Trust Co., January 21, 1922. 
.Changed to State Bank, January 23, 1922. 
.Changed to State Bank, February 1, 1922. 
.Sold to Trust Co., December 31, 1921. 
.Changed to State Bank, February 11, 1922. 
.Closed March 1, 1922, W. D. Barnes, Receiver. 
.Changed to State Bank, June 30, 1922. 
.Changed to State Bank, June 30, 1922. 
.Changed to State Bank, July 31, 1922. 
.Changed to State Bank, September 2, 1922. 
.Changed to State Bank, September 30, 1922. 



Change of Name — Private Banks 
E. R. Robards Bank, Stilesville, changed to Tri-County Bank, December 26, 1921. 

TRUST COMPANIES 
Incorporated September 30, 1921, to September 30, 1922 



Name 


Location 


Capital 


Incorporated 


Opened 






$30,000 

25,000 

100,000 

300.000 

50,000 

100,000 

200,000 

100,000 

25,000 


Nov. 30, 1921 
Jan. 20, 1922 
Mar. 9, 1922 
June 15, 1921 
Jan. 18, 1922 
April 19, 1922 
May 17, 1922 
July 15, 1922 
June 21, 1922 


Dec. 19, 1921 






Jan. 23. 1922 


Old Capital Bank & Trust Co. . . 




Mar. 9, 1922 




Fort Wayne 


Mar. 18, 1922 




May 17, 1922 






June 1, 1922 






June 12, 1922 






July 17, 1922 


Farmers Loan & Trust Co 


Nappanee 


Aug. 30, 1922 



Trust Companies Liquidated 

First State Trust & Savings Bank, Indiana Harbor, converted to National Bank, December 6, 1921. 
Farmers Savings & Trust Co., Corydon, closed February 20, 1922, Sam. Riely, Receiver. 
Farmers Trust Co., Columbus, and Peoples Savings & Trust Co., Columbus, absorbed by Union Trust Co. 
Columbus, June 12, 1922. 

Union Trust Co., Crawfordsville, taken over by Crawfordsville Trust Co., August 9, 1922. 

Change op Name — Trust Companies 
Elkhart County Trust Co., Goshen, changed to Salem Bank & Trust Co., December 31, 1921. 



Department of Banking 



225 






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226 



Year Book 



RESOURCES OF STATE BANKS 



356 
422 
381 
113 
216 
451 
535 
362 

470 
221 
306 
172 

404 
410 
551 
511 
23 

185 
292 
318 
455 

315 

39 

434 

50 
554 



152 
610 
370 

273 

140 

89 



37 



234 
169 

405 
284 
142 
514 
57 
509 
596 
371 

112 

222 



530 

456 
194 

538 

244 
276 

445 

432 
267 
314 

548 
291 
473 



Acton State Bank Acton $194, 023 89 

State Bank of Advance, Advance 265 , 272 94 

State Bank of Akron, Akron .... 267 , 493 54 

Albany State Bank, Albany 388, 835 49 

Farmers State Bank, Albion .... 399, 256 33 

Alert State Bank, Alert 165, 251 29 

State Bank of Amboy, Amboy . . 201 , 028 78 
Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

Ambia 184,318 29 

Anderson Banking Co., Anderson 1 , 905, 133 44 

The Citizens Bank, Anderson .... 2, 276, 540 29 

State Bank of Andrews, Andrews 279, 483 42 
Steuben County State Bank, 

Angola 338,799 36 

Areola State Bank, Areola 257,151 17 

Citizens State Bank, Argos 396, 879 12 

The Ashley State Bank, Ashley.. 165,701 09 

State Bank of Atlanta, Atlanta... 214,464 73 
Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

Attica 1,129,529 13 

Auburn State Bank, Auburn 767,912 44 

Aurora State Bank, Aurora 423, 102 28 

Austin State Bank, Austin 99, 105 99 

The Farmers State Bank, Bain- 
bridge 204,343 85 

Farmers State Bank, Bargersville 236,844 83 

The Batesville Bank, Batesville.. 1,018,027 61 
Battle Ground State Bank, 

Battle Ground 306, 550 04 

Stone City Bank, Bedford 1 , 029, 117 89 

Bentonville State Bank, Benton- 

ville 88,220 48 

Bank of Berne, Berne 592 , 063 37 

Peoples State Bank, Berne 510, 789 55 

Citizens State Bank, Bicknell .... 269, 712 53 

Bippus State Bank, Bippus 220, 728 81 

Bloomfield State Bank, Bloom- 
field 382,356 95 

Citizens State Bank, Bloomfield . 233, 762 03 
Monroe County State Bank, 

Bloomington 945, 991 73 

The Studebaker Bank, Bluff ton . 2, 236, 328 65 

The Wells County Bank, Bluff ton 1,416,835 85 
Sugar Creek State Bank, Boggs- 

town 51,604 68 

Borden State Bank, Borden .... 219, 555 05 
Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

Boswell 284,033 97 

Farmers State Bank , Boston 152 , 448 77 

Bourbon Banking Co., Bourbon . 191 , 859 19 

First State Bank, Bourbon 696, 059 79 

Bremen State Bank, Bremen. . . . 306, 670 95 

Union State Bank, Bremen 563, 299 23 

Bristol State Bank, Bristol 220, 582 47 

Citizens State Bank Bristol 116, 972 65 

Broad Ripple State Bank Broad 

Ripple 369,975 53 

Bank of Brookston, Brookston ... 295, 196 34 
Farmers Bank of Brookston, 

Brookston 340,892 57 

Brownsburg State Bank, Browns- 
burg 248,163 47 

Citizens State Bank — Ewing, 

Brownstown 255, 112 13 

Brownsville State Bank, Browns- 
ville 137,977 54 

Bruceville State Bank, Bruceville 191 , 470 66 
Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

Bryant....... 227,639 71 

Buck Creek State Bank, Buck 

Creek 128,395 36 

Farmers State Bank, Bunker Hill 221 , 231 09 
State Bank of Burnettsville, 

Burnettsville 241, 729 34 

Burlington State Bank, Burling- 
ton. 246,249 00 

Burney State Bank, Burney. . . . 131, 564 16 

Knisely Bros. & Co. Bank, Butler 527, 324 03 
Butlerville State Bank, Butler- 

ville 214,393 04 

Camden State Bank, Camden. . . . 217, 838 45 

Farmers State Bank, Camden. ... 178, 189 04 
State Bank of Campbellsburg, 

Campbellsburg. 283, 257 82 



275 Peoples State Bank, Carlisle .... $596, 343 88 

265 Citizens State Bank, Carmel .... 287 , 883 44 

617 State Bank of Carthage.Carthage 393,845 17 
403 Centerville State Bank, Center- 

ville 232,325 68 

195 Bank of Chalmers, Chalmers. . . 264,145 99 
191 State Bank of Chalmers, Chal- 
mers 184,532 75 

66 Bank of Charlestown, Charles- 
town 352,758 21 

339 Chesterton Bank, Chesterton.... 954,794 99 
260 The Chrisney State Bank, Chris- 

ney 238,008 74 

549 Farmers State Bank, Chrisney.. 178,822 17 
441 The Farmers State Bank, Chur- 

ubusco 247, 611 95 

475 Exchange Bank, Churubusco.. . . 413,918 65 
375 State Bank of Clarks Hill, Clarks 

Hill 127,009 88 

199 Clarksburg State Bank, Clarks- 

burg 185,331 09 

525 Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

ClayCity 625,949 30 

491 State Bank of Claypool, Claypool 199,113 23 

391 Clayton State Bank, Clayton. . . 178,075 98 

589 Clermont State Bank, Clermont 111,363 54 

94 Citizens Bank, Clinton 797, 188 38 

536 Ninth Street State Bank, Clinton 288, 245 27 

424 Farmers State Bank, Colfax .... 199, 516 34 
572 Coatesville State Bank, Coates- 

ville 90,987 63 

263 Central State Bank, Connersville 661,010 23 

270 Farmers State Bank, Converse. . 359, 736 89 

612 Corydon State Bank, Corydon . . 306, 648 04 

446 The Citizens Bank, Covington . . 523,873 78 

486 Farmers State Bank, Craigsville 153,703 75 
567 Harrison County State Bank, 

Crandall. 107,471 48 

1 67 Crawfordsville State Bank, Craw- 

fordsville 1,047, 114,54 

181 Cromwell State Bank, Cromwell. 287,889 19 

500 Sparta State Bank, Cromwell. . . 205, 125 22 
252 Cross Plains State Bank, Cross 

Plains 216,760 60 

400 Citizens State Bank, Crothers- 

ville 91,994 77 

121 Crothersville State Bank, 

Crothersville 401,490 50 

108 Commercial Bank, Crown Point. 473,567 37 

200 Peonies State Bank, Crown Point 1, 186 566 37 
513 State Exchange Bank, Culver.... 768,013 08 
232 Cynthiana Banking Company, 

Cvnthiana 250,034 51 

351 Dale State Bank, Dale 284, 530 45 

541 Farmers & Merchants State 

Bank, Dale 120, 124 58 

215 Bank of Dana, Dana 299, 382 25 

190 Danville State Bank, Danville. . 258,443 50 
399 Darlington State Bank, Darling- 
ton 360,147 70 

259 Farmers & Merchants State 

Bank, Darlington 269, 639 78 

6 Old Adams County Bank 

Decatur 1, 398 742 68 

324 Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

Decker 187,619 33 

390 Delphi State Bank, Delphi 662, 145 50 

527 Citizens State Bank Denver. .. . 177,47114 

136 Dillsboro State Bank, Dillsboro. 464,280 64 

327 Farmers State Bank, Dubois. . . . 206,446 47 

197 The Dugger State Bank, Dugger 373,970 86 

122 First State Bank, Dunkirk 904, 566 96 

340 Dupont State Bank, Dupont. . . . 195, 681 92 
242 Earl Park State Bank, Earl Park 167, 617 33 
510 American State Bank, East 

Chicago 556,840 17 

332 East Chicago State Bank, East 

Chicago 809,758 22 

611 Peoples State Bank.East Chicago 183, 939 44 

219 Eaton State Bank, Eaton 155, 966 67 

102 Farmers State Bank, Eaton 447 , 5 1 1 42 

581 The Thompson State Bank, 

Edinburg 635,529 26 



Department op Banking , 



227 



RESOURCES OF STATE BANKS— Continued 



487 The Edwardsporf Bank, Edwards- 
port $140,527 67 

229 Elberfeld State Bank, Elberfeld . . 348 , 728 93 

569 First Old State Bank, Elkhart.. . 818, 621 11 

12 St. Joe Valley Bank, Elkhart ... 4, 627, 707 93 

202 Peoples State Bank, Ellettsville. 183, 155 94 

299 Citizens State Bank, Elwood. . . 1, 164,462 40 

151 Elwood State Bank, Elwood .... 974, 759 47 

449 Farmers State Bank, Eminence.. 254,797 76 
149 Crawford County State Bank, 

English 616,515 59 

247 Farmers & Citizens Bank, Evans- 

ville (Howell) 460,486 18 

439 The Lamasco Bank, Evansville. . 1 , 116, 031 93 
505 Mercantile-Commercial Bank, 

Evansville 2,422,525 40 

411 North Side Bank, Evansville. ... 1 , 490, 861 67 

148 West Side Bank, Evansville 3 , 533 , 334 99 

330 Fairbanks State Bank, Fairbanks 182,756 07 
367 Citizens State Bank, Fairmount. 195,153 80 
209 Fairmount State Bank, Fair- 
mount 411,787 29 

208 Citizens State Bank, Farmers- 
burg 249,616 29 

30 Farmland State Bank, Farmland 222,483 21 

366 Beckman State Bank, Ferdinand 325,105 73 

452 Union State Bank.Flat Rock .... 139, 492 98 

174 Florence Deposit Bank, Florence 125,522 17 

250 The Fortviile Bank, Fortville. ... 455, 116 13 
591 The Broadway State Bank, Ft. 

Wayne 202,392 80 

559 The Ft. Wayne State Bank, 

Ft. Wayne 302,483 29 

460 Farmers State Bank, Fountain- 
town 131,917 51 

595 Fountain State Bank, Fountain 

City 133,673 36 

74 Bank of Benton County, Fowler 392,512 24 
145 State Bank of Francesville, 

Francesville 316,804 06 

307 Francisco State Bank, Francisco 192,296 55 

10 Farmers Bank, Frankfort 1,345,435 54 

227 The Freelandville Bank, Free- 

landville. 216,263 66 

379 First State Bank, Fremont 214, 560 10 

164 French Lick State Bank, French 

Lick.... 1,371,911 75 

398 Friendship State Bank, Friend- 
ship 228,421 75 

286 Fulton State Bank Fulton 254, 453 44 

393 First State Bank, Galveston .... 151,626 35 

88 Garrett State Bank, Garrett .... 839, 000 12 

523 American State Bank, Gary 369, 371 65 

249 First State Bank, Gary (Tolles- 

ton) 386,184 80 

269 Gary State Bank, Gary 3, 428, 979 76 

562 Mid-City State Bank, Gary .... 173, 603 66 

598 Peoples State Bank, Gary 319, 047 74 

254 First State Bank, Gas City 331 , 922 36 

325 Gaston Banking Company, Gas- 

ton 295,605 41 

107 Bank of Geneva, Geneva 472 , 023 91 

337 Farmers & Merchants State 

Bank, Geneva.. 284,874 99 

326 Georgetown State Bank, George- 

town 153,307 67 

279 Glenwood State Bank, Glenwood 205,618 16 

78 State Bank of Goshen, Goshen. . 786, 176 06 

607 Gosport State Bank, Gosport.... 193,488 90 ■ 

257 Grabill State Bank, Grabill 302, 021 63 

483 Grandview Bank, Grandview . . . 372,329 21 
116 Capital State Bank, Greenfield. . 350, 879 19 
118 The Greenfield Banking Com- 
pany, Greenfield. 636, 564- 40 

155 State Bank of Greentown, Green- 
town 397,408 17 

590 Griffith State Bank, Griffith. ... 87, 703 65 
620 Gwynneville State Bank, 

Gwynneville 86,758 15 

380 Hamlet State Bank, Hamlet. ... 242, 950 15 
546 State Bank of Hammond, Ham- 
mond 246,823 35 

571 Peoples Cooperative State Bank, 

Hammond 449,483 86 



345 Hanover Deposit Bank, Hanover $94, 829 64 

363 Harlan State Bank, Harlan 241 , 184 37 

87 Blackford County Bank, Hart- 
ford City 676,829 54 

16 Citizens State Bank, Hartford 

City 1,477,251 98 

193 The Haubstadt Bank, Haubstadt 646,362 73 

157 Citizens State Bank. Hazleton ... 404, 045 24 

288 The Citizens Bank, Hebron . 336, 001 49 

580 Hemlock State Bank, Hemlock... 101,664 11 
182 Henryville State Bank. Henry- 

ville 676,829 54 

361 Hillsboro State Bank, Hillsboro.. 189,619 07 

319 Hoagland State Bank, Hoagland. 203,849 69 

120 The First State Bank, Hobart. . . . 638, 087 57 

435 Farmers State Bank, Hobbs 213, 113 05 

137 Holton State Bank, Holton 273,713 71 

409 Hope State Bank, Hope 255 , 304 03 

603 The State Bank of Lima, Howe.. 433,332 68 

495 Farmers State Bank, Hudson. . . 203,656 07 

22 Huntingburg Bank, Huntingburg 673,404 51 

150 Citizens State Bank, Huntington 1,469,343 60 
134 Huntington County State Bank, 

Huntington 1,452,514 91 

407 Huntertown State Bank, Hunter- 
town ...' 177,431 40 

236 Hymera State Bank, Hymera . . . 447, 224 80 
471 State Bank of Idaville, Idaville. . 217, 704 52 
521 Brightwood State Bank, Indian- 
apolis. 266,079 53 

384 Citizens State Bank, Indianapolis 899,739 82 
601 East Side State Bank, Indian- 
apolis 161,544 96 

385 Irvington State Bank, Indian- 

apolis 481,277 93 

614 Forty Second Street State Bank, 

Indianapolis 89, 230 58 

300 Fountain Square State Bank, 

Indianapolis 876, 112 89 

417 Live Stock Exchange Bank, 

Indianapolis 1,451, 635 68 

372 Marion County State Bank, 

Indianapolis 1,088,616 30 

241 Meyer-Kiser Bank, Indianapolis 5,279,096 65 
414 Northwestern State Bank, 

Indianapolis. 725,407 33 

129 Peoples State Bank, Indianapolis 2 , 590 , 514 90 
613 Sixteenth Street State Bank, 

Indianapolis 173,407 41 

394 South Side State Bank, Indian- 
apolis 1,529, 137 45 

565 State Bank of Massachusetts 

Avenue, Indianapolis 206, 771 64 

615 Tuxedo State Bank, Indianapolis 79, 629 37 
218 J. F. Wild & Co. Bank, Indian- 
apolis 4,649,527 25 

160 Citizens State Bank, Jamestown . 409 , 325 00 
419 The Peoples State Bank, Jason- 

ville 437,203 69 

26 Dubois County State Bank, 

Jasper 620,893 91 

105 Farmers & Merchants State 

Bank, Jasper 480,212 41 

353 German-American Bank, Jasper. 347,108 84 
517 Clark County State Bank, Jeffer- 

sonville 868,006 29 

444 Jonesville State Bank, Jonesville 103,67185 
189 State Bank of Kempton, Kemp- 
ton 338,946 56 

65 Noble County Bank, Kendallville 1,305,09138 
304 Discount & Deposit Bank, Kent- 
land 801,434 21 

357 Kent State Bank, Kentland .... 432, 916 64 

545 Citizens State Bank, Kingman.. 260,023 89 

550 Kingman State Bank, Kingman. 218,314 65 

507 State Farmers Bank, Keystone . . 183 , 254 44 

386 First State Bank, Kewanna..... 409,735 94 

501 State Bank of Kimmell, Kimmell 139, 076 84 

397 Farmers State Bank, Kirklin. . . . 202, 731 73 

133 Farmers State Bank, Knox 580, 851 04 

479 South Kokomo Bank, Kokomo. . 203,411 06 

528 Porter County State Bank, Kouts 254,946 85 

482 Citizens State Bank, Lacrosse. ... 306, 505 57 

442 Citizens State Bank, Ladoga.. . . 568, 618 13 



228 



Year Book 



RESOURCES OF STATE BANKS— Continued 



132 

522 
171 
387 
396 
516 
347 
463 
223 
210 

214 
428 
233 

224 

373 

130 
302 

578 
609 

437 
597 

277 

350 
217 
512 

430 

582 



97 

158 
592 

395 
474 
493 
566 
212 
503 
175 
524 

262 
271 

529 
584 
364 
427 
32 

497 

354 
19 

583 

431 
542 
119 
481 
577 
312 

576 
560 



564 

248 
289 
309 



Farmers & Traders State Bank, 

Lafayette $3, 791, 794 63 

Farmers State Bank, Lafontaine. 154,926 45 

Lagrange State Bank, Lagrange . 500 , 652 34 

Citizens State Bank, Lagro 176, 986 49 

Laketon State Bank, Laketon. . . 139, 384 35 

Farmers State Bank, Lakeville. . 173, 371 73 

Farmers State Bank, Lanesville. 306, 103 94 

Farmers State Bank, Lapaz 191 , 332 37 

State Bank of Lapel, Lapel 177, 101 94 

A. P. Andrew, Jr., & Son Bank, 

Laporte 2 , 886,583 38 

Bank of State of Indiana, Laporte 1,951,741 20 

Lawrence State Bank, Lawrence. 161,560 71 
The American State Bank, Law- 

renceburg 335, 220 70 

Leavenworth State Bank, 

Leavenworth 274,035 24 

Boone County State Bank, 

Lebanon 859, 507 58 

Farmers State Bank, Lebanon ... 869 , 692 26 

Peoples State Bank, Leesburg. . . 238, 729 30 

Farmers State Bank, Leipsic 88, 656 58 

Leiters Ford State Bank, Leiters 

Ford 124,182 76 

Letts State Bank, Letts 155, 604 77 

Lexington State Bank, Lexington 184, 946 98 
Liberty Center Deposit Bank, 

Liberty Center 273, 793 42 

The Citizens Bank, Ligonier 942 , 992 41 

Mier State Bank, Loonier 996, 711 04 

Linden State Bank, Linden 219,338 41 

Linusburg State Bank, Linnsburg 131,822 12 

State Bank of Lizton, Lizton . .. . 166,554 52 
Farmers & Merchants State 

Bank, Logansport 925,088 20 

Logansport State Bank, Logans- 
port 1,506,153 12 

The White River Bank.Loogootee 380,154 75 
Losantville State Bank, Losant- 

ville 215,820 39 

Lucerne State Bank, Lucerne ... 161 , 270 87 

Citizens Banking Co., Lynn .... 401, 360 43 

Corn Exchange Bank, Lyons. ... 183, 264 98 

Mackey State Bank, Mackey . . . 109, 651 97 

Marion State Bank, Marion 1, 354, 672 34 

South Marion State Bank,Marion 182,678 06 

Farmers & Traders Bank, Markle 346 , 902 52 
Markleville State Bank, Markle- 

ville 297,318 88 

Farmers State Bank, Matthews. 150,851 07 
Medaryville State Bank.Medary- 

ville 266,688 60 

The Medora State Bank, Medora 256, 227 65 

Farmers State Bank, Mentone . . 713, 923 32 

Merom State Bank, Merom 171, 360 21 

Farmers State Bank, Mexico . . 155,85192 
The Citizens Bank, Michigan 

City 2,920,669 07 

Peoples State Bank, Michigan- 
town , 273, 624 42 

First State Bank, Middlebury ... 443 , 106 82 
The Farmers State Bank, Middle- 
town 447,647 59 

Middletown State Bank, Middle- 
town 130, 543 10 

Farmers State Bank, Miami .... 217, 990 01 

Farmers State Bank, Milan 100, 564 37 

The State Bank of Milan, Milan. 575, 916 35 
Farmers State Bank, Milford. ... 307, 177 52 
Citizens State Bank, Milford. . . . 165 , 566 57 
Millersburg State Bank, Millers- 
burg 204,017 93 

West End State Bank.Mishawaka 321,655 16 
The Mohawk State Bank, 

Mohawk 163,719 32 

Mongo State Bank, Mongo 165,788 79 

Farmers & Traders State Bank, 

Monon 357,436 79 

State Bank of Monon, Monon.. . 358, 133 89 

Monroe State Bank, Monroe 159, 399 79 

Monroe City State Bank, Monroe 

City 142,800 58 

Citizens State Bank, Monroeville 475, 955 50 



585 



360 
109 



335 
67 



144 



4 

344 

346 

69 

579 

619 

266 
494 
176 
450 



518 

278 
377 

602 

539 

3 

328 

476 
568 

173 
618 
406 
204 
264 

563 
504 

295 

11 
355 
573 

338 



135 
477 



502 
165 



461 

537 

478 
616 
243 
297 
211 
28 
402 
163 



557 



State Bank of Montezuma, 

Montezuma $220,783 12 

Farmers State Bank, Monticello 184,214 31 
State Bank of Monticello, Monti- 
cello 608,699 53 

Montmorenci State Bank, Mont- 

morenci 295,370 89 

Farmers Deposit Bank, Mont- 

pelier 553,217 57 

The Mooreland State Bank, 

Mooreland 201,034 20 

Moores Hill State Bank, Moores 

Hill 177,828 28 

Farmers State Bank, Mooresville 650,403 44 

Citizens State Bank, Morocco.. . 243,956 64 

Farmers State Bank, Morocco . . 201, 337 89 

Union State Bank, Morristown... 233,404 33 
The State Bank of Mt. Ayr, 

Mt.Ayr 169,839 56 

Mt. Summit State Bank, Mt. 

Summit 102, 571 20 

Mulberry State Bank 488, 091 38 

Farmers Savings Bank, Muncie. . 475,555 02 

Napoleon State Bank, Napoleon. 181, 734 27 
Farmers and Traders Bank, 

Nappanee 483,853 15 

Nashville State Bank, Nashville 226,664 12 
Farmers and Traders State Bank, 

Needham 82,619 06 

Floyd County Bank, New Albany 917,908 99 
New Augusta State Bank, New 

Augusta 218,358 28 

Newburgh State Bank.Newburgh 231,542 26 

Farmers State BankNew Carlisle 237, 926 39 

Citizens State Bank, Newcastle . . 1 , 941 , 249 7 1 
New Haven State Bank, New 

Haven 555,034 59 

Peoples State Bank, New Haven 373,538 66 
New Marion State Bank, New 

Marion 100,392 17 

Farmers State Bank.NewMarket 246,441 88 

New Paris State Bank, New Paris 207,089 77 

First StateBank, Newpoint 218, 454 48 

Citizens State Bank, Newport ... 200, 323 69 
Corn Exchange State Bank, New 

Richmond 238,358 42 

Farmers State Bank, New Ross . . 89 , 264 80 
New Salem State Bank, New 

Salem 153,389 33 

New Washington State Bank, 

New Washington 233, 076 47 

Citizens State Bank, Noblesville 918,385 92 

First State Bank, North Judson. 818,579 74 
North Judson State Bank, North 

Judson 162,393 94 

North Liberty State Bank, North 

Liberty. . ._ 390,341 50 

North Madison State Bank, 

NorthMadison 103,422 88 

Indiana State Bank, North 

Manchester 642,049 73 

Farmers State Bank, North 

Webster 178,374 68 

Oaklandon State Bank, Oak- 

landon 174,791 39 

Columbia State Bank, Oakland 

City 329,905 17 

Oaktown Bank, Oaktown 345,537 00 

Farmers State Bank, Oakville. . . 122, 671 29 
Farmers & Merchants State 

Bank, Oldenburg. 257, 557 23 

Farmers State Bank, Onward.... 121,513 26 

Oolitic StateBank, Oolitic 76,032 91 

Citizens State Bank , Orland 173 , 723 28 

Citizens State Bank Orleans 310,461 66 

The Osgood Bank, Osgood 252 , 440 20 

Ripley County Bank, Osgood . . . 884, 833 31 

Farmers State Bank, Ossian 292, 273 50 

Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

Otterbein 491,843 81 

State Bank of Otterbein, Otter- 
bein 447,386 90 

Otwell State Bank, Otwell 421,500 64 

First State Bank, Owensville .... 368, 121 62 



Department of Banking 



229 



RESOURCES OF STATE BANKS— Continued 



125 The Old State Bank, Owensville. $204, 181 31 
146 The State Bank of Oxford, Oxford 259,727 64 

58 Orange County Bank, Paoli 390, 106 29 

454 Paoli State Bank, Paoli 509, 786 21 

320 Paragon State Bank, Paragon.... 131,761 69 
178 Paris Crossing State Bank, Paris 

Crossing 101,611 09 

413 Parker Banking Co., Parker. . . . 295,038 46 

64 Patriot Deposit Bank, Patriot . . 154,333 84 

261 Citizens State Bank, Pekin 218, 081 97 

220 Pendleton Banking Co., Pendle- 
ton 408,903 49 

588 The Pennville Bank, Pennville. . 172,855 96 

206 Peoples State Bank, Pennville... 130,055 19 
520 State Bank of 1 ierceton, Pierce- 

ton 334,544 73 

5 Citizens State Bank, Petersburg. 1,009,768 35 

555 Pittsboro State Bank, Pittsboro. 167,284 70 

44 Citizens State Bank, Plainfield... 252,529 06 

448 First State Bank, Pleasant Lake 184,606 60 

73 Plymouth State Bank, Plymouth 888,537 33 

389 Farmers State Bank, Poneto.. . . 165, 243 02 

570 First State Bank, Porter 154, 461 59 

8 The Citizens Bank, Portland. . . 968,494 56 

464 Farmers State Bank, Portland. . 325,822 20 

1 The Peoples Bank, Portland .... 1 , 202, 490 58 

469 Farmers State Bank, Preble 149, 775 87 

358 Raub State Bank, Raub 103,206 65 

574 Ray State Bank, Ray 103, 208 45 

110 Bank of Red Key, Red Key ... . 383, 957 56 
436 Farmers State Bank, Red Key . . 219, 748 53 
311 State Bank of Remington, Rem- 
ington 

192 State Bank of Rensselaer, Rens- 
selaer 

280 Lake State Bank, Richland 

440 Bank of Reynolds, Reynolds 

131 Ridgeville State Bank, Ridgeville 
123 Rising Sun State Bank, Rising 

Sun 

86 Roachdale Bank, Roachdaie 

480 State Exchange Bank, Roann. . . 

472 Farmers State Bank, Roanoke. . . 

46 The Farmers Bank, Rocknort . . . 

25 Old Rockport Bank, Rockport . . 

95 Parke State Bank, RockviJle 

485 Farmers State Bank, Rossville . . 
336 Citizens State Bank, Royal 

Center 

196 The Royal Center State Bank, 

Royal Center 

365 State Bank of Russellville, 

Russellville 

42 Citizens State Bank, Salem 

322 Farmers State Bank, Salem .... 
531 State Bank of Salem, Salem .... 

207 Sandborn Banking Co., Sandborn 
177 Saratoga State Bank, Saratoga. . . 
605 Farmers State Bank, Scircleville. 

126 Scottsburg State Bank, Scotts- 

burg 

53 Scott County State Bank, Scotts- 
burg 

313 Sellersburg State Bank, Sellers- 
burg 252,130 32 18 

433 American State Bank, Sheridan.. 256,179 35 331 

285 Farmers State Bank, Shipshe- 

wana 229,562.03 290 

547 Citizens State Bank, Shirley. ... 204, 727 67 
29 Martin County Bank, Shoals... 363,792 17 488 

594 Sidney State Bank,. Sidney 162,434 80 296 

230 Commercial State Bank, Silver 

Lake 256,076 63 106 

388 Chapin State Bank. South Bend 1, 708, 958 44 

604 LaSaUe State Bank, South Bend 313,789 63 21 

608 Washington State Bank, South 

Bend 214,995 56 349 

593 Toth State Bank, South Bend . . . 236 , 277 60 

552 Peoples State Bank, South Bend 950,997 78 575 

553 South Bend State Bank, South 258 

Bend 878,907 06 

586 Fodor State Bank, South Bend... 73,387 51 556 

587 Peoples State Bank, South Mil- 490 

ford 160,329 72 497 



439,631 58 

603,485 90 
176,636 41 
264, 148 47 
298,758 20 

397,246 53 
410,207 19 
275,458 27 
219,190 47 
314,852 21 
349,458 71 
643,214 09 
193,518 21 

219,216 22 

389, 118 55 

150,705 55 
305,335 04 
198,092 47 
1,030,217 63 
195,582 62 
207,388 23 
144,901 64 

401,222 93 



303,087 13 468 



240 

170 

7 
459 

416 
421 

533 
426 
341 

465 
255 
114 
558 

139 
408 
305 
453 
238 
532 

48 



515 
166 
429 
378 

561 



239 
599 
329 
412 
245 
526 
45 

433 



506 



72 
606 
540 
534 
467 
161 

372 
543 



Farmers State Bank, South 
Whitley 

Mayer State Bank.South Whitley 

The Exchange Bank, Spencer 

Farmers and Merchants State 
Bank, Spencerville 

First State Bank, Star City 

The Citizens State Bank, Stiies- 
ville 

Fanners State Bank, St. Paul. . . 

St. Joe Valley Bank, St. Joe ... . 

The State Bank of Stockwell, 
Stockwell 

Farmers State Bank, Stroh 

The Peoples State Bank, Sullivan 

Sullivan State Bank, Sullivan . . . 

Farmers State Bank, Summit- 
ville 

The Sunman- State Bank,Sunman 

Farmers State Bank, Sweetser . . 

State Bank of Syracuse, Syracuse 

Citizens State Bank, Tab 

Indiana State Bank, Terre Haute 

Twelve Points State Bank, Terre 
Haute 

State Bank of Thorntown, Thorn- 
town 

Tippecanoe State Bank, Tippe- 
canoe 

Farmers State Bank, Topeka 

State Bank of Topeka, Topeka. . 

Troy State Bank, Troy 

Twelve Mile State Bank, Twelve 
Mile 

Farmers State Bank, Tyner 

State Bank of Uniondale, Union- 
dale 

The Atlas State Bank.Union City 

Union State Bank, Union Mills.. 

Upland State Bank, Upland 

Farmers State Bank, Urbana . . . 

Vallonia State Bank, Vallonia. . . 

Farmers State Bank, Valparaiso. 

State Bank of Valparaiso, Val- 



Van Buren State Bank, Van 
Buren 

The Farmers State Bank, Vee- 
dersburg 

Veedersburg State Bank.Veeders- 
burg 

The Versailles Bank, Versailles.. 

Vevay Deposit Bank, Vevay — 

North Side State Bank.Vincennes 

Farmers State Bank, Waldron. . 

State Bank of Waldron, Waldron 

Farmers State Bank, Walkerton. 

State Bank of Walkerton, Walker- 
ton 

Cass County State Bank, Walton 

Wanamaker State Bank, Wana- 
maker 

State Bank of Wanatah.Wanatah 

Lake City Bank, Warsaw 

State Bank of Warsaw, Warsaw 

State Bank of Washington, 
Washington 

State Bank of Waveland, Wave- 
land 

Farmers State Bank, Wawaka . . 

Waynetown State Bank, Wayne- 
town 

The Farmers State Bank, West 
College Corner, O 

State Bank of Westfield, West- 
field 

Purdue State Bank, West 
Lafayette 

Westpoint State Bank, Westpoint 

State Bank of West Terre Haute, 
West Terre Haute. 

Peoples State Bank, Whitestown. 

Bank of Whiting, Whiting 

Central State Bank, Whiting .... 



$261,486 72 
363,870 14 
512,852 19 

216,587 26 
304,884 66 

159.200 36 
190,668 07 
171,946 95 

241.201 43 
199,525 20 

1,772,397 00 
541,326 75 

136,276 56' 
509,507 50 
271,387 96 
461,484 42 
102,831 69 
589,210 95 

628,761 31 

346,886 73 

64,047 16 
173,942 71 
403,670 62 
294,311 99 

256,637 10 
126,846 31 

350,875 31 
1,009,948 01 
222,757 46 
215,084 32 
210,725 88 
221,683 74 
990,248 62 

1,094,673 15 

465,239 30 

252,282 42 

165,581 18 
433, 196 85 
653,079 85 
116,991 16 
153,241 61 
224,394 33 
265,973 92 

354,027 26 
259,875 84 

159,096 56 

389,409 55 

559,672 58 

1,151,242 36 

299,425 83 

218,389 44 
101,473 88 

315,520 13 

697,561 34 

190,480 83 

451,432 74 

98, 162 74 

575,274 95 

244,111 67 

1,893,523 83 

401,440 33 



230 



Year Book 



RESOURCES OF STATE BANKS— Continued 



38 


Warren County Bank, Williams- 




184 


State Bank of Wolcott, Wolcott . . 


$397,841 30 




port 


$502,843 74 


180 


State Bank of Wolcottville, Wol- 




92 


Williamsport State Bank, Wil- 






cottville 


374,223 45 




liamsport 


503,006 19 


492 


Wildman State Bank, Wolcott- 




508 


Willow Branch State Bank, 






ville '. 


194,643 83 






138,935 68 


519 


Wolf Lake State Bank, Wolf Lake 


114,408 08 


14 


Farmers and Merchants Bank, 




143 


Woodburn State Bank, Woodbum 


195,999 31 




Winchester 


684,806 72 


333 


Worthington Exchange State 




IS 










243,246 63 




Chester 


445,609 16 


348 


Yoder State Bank, Yoder 


184,167 52 


447 


Farmers State Bank, Windfall . . . 


183,353 94 


484 


Farmers State Bank, Young 




80 


The Peoples State Bank, Windfall 


414,007 86 




America 


210,511 85 


71 


The Farmers State Bank, Wingate 


310,810 29 








369 


Citizens State Bank, Wolcott. . . 


199,909 77 




Total $235,389,790 88 




RESOURCES OF PRIVATE BANKS 




155 


Akron Exchange Bank, Akron . . 


$612,787 78 


315 


Bank of Hardinsburg, Hardins- 




147 


Alexandria Bank, Alexandria 


632,440 01 




burg 


$221,035 87 


346 


Central Bank, Arcadia 


375,018 13 


216 


Farmers Bank, Hazelwood 


91,703 30 


11 


Arlington Bank, Arlington 


176,090 04 


322 


Farmers and Merchants Bank, 




383 


Atwood Bank, Atwood 


96,321 27 




Highland 


136,046 80 


58 


Farmers and Merchants Bank, 




64 


Hobart Bank, Hobart 


266,051 °8 




Avilla 


271,173 14 


318 


Hillisburg Bank, Hillisburg. ..... 


101,460 90 


379 


Farmers Bank of Belle Union, 




384 


The Citizens Bank, Jolietville 


40,863 37 




Belle Union— Coatesville 


64,314 66 


240 


Citizens Bank, Jonesboro 


185,498 08 


23 


Bloomingdale Bank, Blooming- 




91 


Campbell & Fetter Bank, Ken- 






dale 


185,964 67 




dallville 


468,097 88 


357 


Showers Bros. Savings Co. 




319 


Kennard Bank, Kennard 


161,343 79 




Bloomington 


145,625 66 


271 


The Bank of Kirkpatrick, Kirk- 




304 


BlountsvilleBank, Blountsville. . 


122,651 42 




patrick 


71,472 69 


377 


Bridgeton Bank, Bridgeton 


53,123 77 


137 


LafontaineBank.Lafontaine 


302,186 10 


231 


Bank of Brook, Brook 


670,579 56 


340 


Farmers and Merchants Bank, 




'AH?, 


Bridgeport Bank, Bridgeport — 
Peoples Deposit Bank, Brooklyn 
Hunter Bank, Brownsburg 


53,571 10 




La Otto 


151,091 09 


?48 


91,934 64 


273 




111,283 14 


247 


335,407 90 


189 


Laurel Bank, Laurel 


104,282 13 


57 


Browns Valley Bank, Browns 
Valley 




77 




528,543 94 




87, 128 45 


299 


Bank of Linn Grove, Linn Grove 


107,084 92 


310 


Bank of Seward, Burkett 


119,378 55 


267 


Citizens Bank, Macy 


195,953 47 


317 


Carbon Bank, Carbon 


179,814 08 


103 


Manilla Bank, Manilla 


341,433 2 7 


348 


Fanners Banking Co., Carlos.. . . 


118,858 53 


308 


Farmers Bank, Marco 


75,801 05 


255 


The Cates Bank, Cates 


97,456 67 


252 


Bank of Marengo, Marengo 


308,355 19 


333 


Citizens Bank, Charlottsville — 


129,365 82 


378 


Bank of Marshfield, Marshfield.. 


75,578 5 8 


160 


Farmers Bank, Clarks Hill 


158,371 00 


64 


Citizens Bank, Marshall 


156,333 29 


201 


Colfax Bank, Colfax 


291,313 31 


306 


The Mecca Bank, Mecca 


107,336 63 


222 


Irwin's Bank, Columbus 


1,562,172 90 


367 


Mechanicsburg Bank.Mechanics- 




356 


The Citizens Bank, Commiskey. 


55,261 93 




burg 


56,725 00 


107 


Thomas Exchange Bank.Corunna 


169,172 84 


54 


Mellott Bank, Mellott 


88,902 69 


327 


The Citizens Bank, Cory 


146,893 82 


296 


The Farmers Bank, Metamora. . 


86,792 62 


265 


Cumberland Bank, Cumberland. 


222,079 82 


381 


Citizens Bank, Metz 


111,332 33 


386 


The Cutler Bank, Cutier 


68,719 03 


146 


The Milroy Bank, Milroy 


204,889 57 


33 


The Commercial Bank, Daleville 


150,589 77 


380 


Washington Township Bank, 




218 


The Peoples Banking Co., 






Milton 


85,437 33 




Darlington 


192,254 87 


69 


Bank of Mitchell, Mitchell 


490,628 50 


329 


Bank of Dayton, Dayton 


246,934 72 


9 


The Citizens Banking Co. , Modoc 


206,284 08 


179 


A. T. Bowen & Co. Bank, Delphi 


1,340,892 81 


311 


Fanners and Merchants Bank, 




360 


Bank of De Motte, De Motte. . . 


106,171 31 




Montgomery 


121,381 24 


251 


Jefferson County Bank, Deputy 


112,336 30 


345 


Farmers Bank, Mooreland 


102,573 23 


276 


The Bank of East Enterprise, 




130 


Muncie Banking Co., Muncie. . . 


33,704 29 






$129,112 50 


279 




94,917 43 


291 


Northern Wayne Bank, Economy 


114,101 09 


300 


The Farmers Bank, New Lisbon. 


135,142 42 


172 


Farmers and Merchants Bank, 




186 


New Palestine Bank, New 






Elizabethtown 


153,348 54 




Palestine 


260,679 17 


35 


The Citizens Bank, Elnora 


172,735 09 


62 


R. H. Nixon & Co. Bank, New- 




144 


Etna Bank, Etna Green 


397, 188 76 




port 


309,589 46 


293 


Falmouth Bank, Falmouth 


123,924 03 


224 


The Citizens Bank, New Ross. . . 


116,462 82 


338 


The Farmers Bank, Fillmore — 


151,848 48 


375 


Jackson Township Bank of Cory- 
don Junction, New Salisbury . . 




385 


Farmers and Merchants Bank, 






93,059 09 




Foraker 


79,102 23 


140 


The Newtown Bank, Newtown.. 


123,042 01 


215 


Citizens Bank, Forrest 


129,079 36 


154 


North Salem Bank, North Salem 


251,754 39 


349 




111,367 76 


336 




161,542 24 


212 


Frankton Bank, Frankton. 


252,279 52 


100 


Bank of Oxford, Oxford 


575, 169 52 


358 


Bank of Fredericksburg, Fred- 




244 


Citizens Bank, Palmyra 


349,540 46 




ericksburg 


148,923 02 


312 


Patricksburg Bank, Patricksburg 


161,195 56 


S8S 


Citizens Bank, Freedom. 

Farmers Bank, Freetown 


33,509 43 


183 




164,154 30 


295 


84,488 80 


314 


The Perrysville Bank, Perrysville 


124,467 33 


26 


G. W. Conwell Bank, Galveston 


• 262,283 43 


355 


Jackson Township Bank, 




373 


Goldsmith Bank, Goldsmith 


81,594 60 




Pershing .• 


90,346 16 


85 


Gosport Bank, Gosport 


176,779 35 


268 


Bank of Petroleum, Petroleum. . 


194, 197 85 


374 


Citizens Bank, Grass Creek 


88,944 51 


111 


Bank of Pine Village, Pine Village 


223,651 08 


202 


Citizens Bank, Greenfield 


383,797 77 


263 


Farmers Bank, Plainville 


233,184 68 


371 


Farmers Bank, Hall 


45,440 74 


337 


Bank of Poland, Poland 


115,559 36 


30 


Hamilton Bank, Hamilton 


328,608 45 


313 


Bank of Poneto, Poneto 


159,753 17 


321 


Farmers and Merchants Bank, 




331 


Rockfield Bank, Rockfield 


134,067 96 




Hanna 


182,318 19 


368 


Peoples Bank, Rolling Prairie. . . 


128,430 63 



Department op Banking 



231 



RESOURCES OF PRIVATE BANKS— Continued 



44 
370 

94 
213 
365 



270 
297 
350 
229 

351 

294 



309 
344 
341 



Romney Bank, Romney $174, 030 78 

Rosston Bank, Rosston 49, 600 76 

Bank of Rossville, Rossville 286, 903 18 

Bank of Russellville, Russellville. 282, 241 46 
Fanners Bank of Salamonia, 

Salamonia 126, 607 10 

Renner's Bank, Sandborn 67, 678 11 

Bank of San Pierre. San Pierre. . . 138 , 365 00 

Amick's Bank, Scipio 78, 720 93 

Bank of Sedalia, Sedalia 127,515 56 

The Bank of Selma, Selma 121,886 16 

The Sharpesville Bank, Sharpes- 

ville 441,846 87 

Citizens Bank, Southport 167, 222 42 

Greensfork Township Bank, 

Spartansburg, Lynn 157, 075 17 

The Henry County Bank, Spice- 
land 360,022 52 

The Springport Bank, Springport 55 , 326 67 
Farmers Bank of St. Bernice, 

St. Bernice.. 184,381 06 

Tri-County Bank, Stilesville. . . . 81,547 95 

The Peoples Bank, Straughn .... 93 , 818 36 

Peoples Bank, Sulphur Springs . . 84, 486 26 
The Sulphur Springs Bank, 

Sulphur Springs 122, 447 35 



387 
283 
287 
246 

72 
258 
126 

37 
365 



195 
157 



362 
369 



266 

74 



Switz City Bank, Switz City. ... $75, 315 43 

Bank of Tocsin, Tocsin 178, 784 57 

Bank of Urbana, Urbana 37, 572 51 

Citizens Bank, Wakarusa 115, 304 09 

Exchange Bank, Wakarusa 462, 970 88 

Farmers Bank, Wallace 91, 707 54 

Exchange Bank, Warren 916, 713 45 

Citizens Bank, Waterloo 291 , 726 75 

Waverly Bank, Waverly 64, 566 77 

*249 Farmers and Merchants Bank, 

Waynetown 96,906 10 

*228 Central Bank, West Lebanon . . . 258, 953 22 

105 Farmers Bank, West Lebanon... 394,113 72 

261 Bank of Westville, Westville 170, 919 21 

BankofWheatfield.Wheatfield.. 194,295 11 
Farmers and Merchants Bank, 

Wheatland 123,702 47 

Farmers Bank of Wyatt.Wyatt.. 201,598 53 

Yeddo Bank. Yeddo 39, 228 09 

Bank of Yeoman, Yeoman 108, 243 02 

Yorktown Banking Co., York- 
town 219,894 83 

Zanesvihe Bank, Zanesville 179, 970 93 

Farmers Bank, Zionville. ....... 318, 772 28 



ToTiL $30,913,323.63 



RESOURCES OF SAVINGS BANKS 



Peoples Savings Bank, Evansville $6,566,554 87 

LaFayette Savings Bank, LaFayette. 



La Porte Savings Bank, La Porte.. , 



3,065,911 23 
2,146,075 65 



St. Joseph County Savings Bank, South 

Bend $3,414,476 13 

Terre Haute Savings Bank.Terre Haute 3,296,294 76 



131 


Commercial Bank & Trust Co., 




203 




Alexandria 


$413,792 93 


6 


184 


Peoples Trust Co., Alexandria.. . 


243,617 20 


165 


15 


Anderson Trust Co, Anderson. . . 


1,486,947 08 




129 


Farmers Trust Co., Anderson . . . 


1,211,092 00 


119 


157 


Madison County Trust Co., 








Anderson 


370,920 02 


210 


80 


Angola Bank Trust Co., Angola. 


720,234 10 




116 


First Trust and Savings Co., 




105 






200,000 86 
573,261 39 




23 


The Citizens Trust Co., Bedford 


183 


176 


Bicknell Trust and Savings Co., 








Bicknell 


274,902 92 


84 


148 


Bloomfield Trust Co., Bloomfield 


238,821 45 


63 


201 


Farmers Bank and Trust Co., 








Bloomfield 


357,427 88 


166 


22 


Citizens Loan and Trust Co., 








Bloomington 


1,450,827 03 


193 


74 


Union Savings and Trust Co., 




117 




Bluffton 


326,659 07 




164 


Peoples Trust and Savings Bank, 




195 




Boonville 


798,778 66 




11 


The Brazil Trust Co., Brazil 


1,348,681 30 


16 


122 


Davis Trust Co., Brazil 


514,574 52 


212 


167 


Peoples Trust Co., Brookville. . . 


731,529 03 




196 


Brownstown Loan and Trust Co., 




190 




Brownstown 


273,616 40 


121 


114 


Wayne Trust Co., Cambridge 




47 




City 


515,626 71 




141 


Peoples Bank and Trust Co., 
Clayton 




50 




190.228 79 




153 


Clinton Trust Co., Clinton 


906,321 50 


189 


86 


The Farmers Loan and Trust 










1,129,997 27 


177 


18 


The Provident Trust Co., 








Columbia City 


759,028 00 


29 


216 


Union Trust Co., Columbus 


1,527,199 96 




34 


Fayette Bank and Trust Co., 




142 




Connersville 


2,632,507 35 


137 


213 


Old Capital Bank and Trust Co., 




102 




Corydon 


430,893 48 




53 


The Fountain Trust Co., Coving- 




208 




ton 


214,043 21 


215 


13 


The Crawfordsville Trust Co., 




111 




Crawfordsville 


821,035 74 




133 


Farmers, Merchants & Clements 




112 




Trust Co., Crawfordsville 


954,851 95 





Total $18,489,312 64 

RESOURCES OF TRUST COMPANIES 

Union Trust Co., Crawfordsville $73,559 34 
The Danville Trust Co., Danville 115, 241 42 
The Peoples Loan and Trust Co., 

Decatur 544,203 35 

Carroll County Loan and Trust 

Co., Delphi 325,659 70 

Citizens Bank and Trust Co., 

Dugger 119,143 63 

First Calumet Trust and Savings 

Bank, East Chicago 1, 152, 831 00 

First Trust and Savings Co., East 

Chicago 270, 137 35 

The Elwood Trust Co., Elwood. . 739, 219 23 
American Trust and Savings Co., 

Evansville 2, 970,420 65 

Citizens Trust and Savings Bank, 

Evansville.... 1,249,197 51 

Farmers Trust Co., Evansville... 475,845 55 
Carroll County Loan, Trust and 

Savings Co., Flora 783, 056 68 

Bowser Loan and Trust Co., 

Ft. Wayne 500,227 06 

Citizens Trust Co., Ft. Wayne . . 2 , 925 , 787 47 
Dime Savings , and Trust Co., 

Ft. Wayne 738,593 57 

Farmers Trust Co., Ft. Wayne. . 1 , 507, 658 91 
The Lincoln Trust Co.,Ft. Wayne 3, 797, 398 07 
The Peoples Trust and Savings 

Co., Ft. Wayne 3,391,877 85 

Tri-State Loan and Trust Co., 

Ft. Wayne 11,947,239 03 

Clinton County Bank and Trust 

Co., Frankfort 1,051,565 07 

Citizens Loan and Trust Co., 

Frankfort 522, 160 60 

Frankfort Loan and Trust Co., 

Frankfort 756,007 31 

Farmers Trust Co., Franklin 592, 123 99 

The Union Trust Co., Franklin. . 200, 851 82 
Garrett Savings, Loan and Trust 

Co., Garrett 263,855 72 

Bankers Trust Co., Gary 217, 846 98 

Commercial Trust Co., Gary . . . 191, 607 93 
Gary Trust and Savings Bank, 

Gary 1,347,037 11 

South Side Trust and Savings 

Co., Gary 711.249 45 



232 



Year Book 



RESOURCES OF TRUST 

147 State Trust and Savings Bank, 

Goodland $247,912 28 

26 Salem Bank and Trust Co., 

Goshen 2,514,887 03 

24 The Central Trust Co., Green- 
castle 816,092 78 

151 The Citizens Trust Co., Green- 
castle 325,127 39 

70 The Union Trust Co., Greensburg 509,553 97 

160 The Union Trust Co., Hagers- 

town 104, 169 90 

126 American Trust and Savings 

Bank, Hammond 808, 775 69 

87 Hammond Trust and Savings 

Bank, Hammond 769, 591 98 

42 First Trust and Savings Bank, 

Hammond 2,285,435 53 

156 Northern Trust and Savings 

Bank, Hammond 283, 979 31 

194 Standard Trust and Savings 

Bank, Hammond 354,977 10 

143 American Trust and Savings 

Bank, Hobart 214, 154 65 

147 The Citizens Trust Co., Hunting- 
burg 214,088 71 

128 The Farmers Trust Co., Hunting- 
ton 441,159 74 

91 The Huntington Trust and Sav- 
ings Bank, Huntington 927 , 558 50 

132 Aetna Trust and Savings Co., 

Indianapolis 2, 108,062 31 

181 Bankers Trust Co., Indianapolis 2,792,900 43 

187 City Trust Co., Indianapolis . . . 2,708,022 96 
68 Farmers Trust Co., Indianapolis 2,132,639 53 

108 Fidelity Trust Co., Indianapolis 2,219,008 66 

138 Fletcher Trust and Savings Co., 

Indianapolis 18,032,737 03 

1 The Indiana Trust Co., Indian- 

apolis 18,419,289 57 

31 Security Trust Co., Indianapolis 3,053,163 21 
163 State Savings and Trust Co., 

Indianapolis 3,686,062 88 

2 Union Trust Co., Indianapolis.. 28,096,325 07 
134 Washington Bank and Trust Co., 

Indianapolis 1,934,469 86 

110 Citizens Trust and Savings Co., 

Indiana Harbor 633,414 38 

90 The Citizens Trust Co., Jefferson- 

ville 1,355,347 02 

82 Kendallville Savings and Trust 

Co., Kendallville 196 , 849 48 

178 American Trust Co., Kokomo. . . 1, 119, 548 31 
130 The Farmers Trust and Savings 

Bank.Kokomo 1,513,065 00 

41 Kokomo Trust Co., Kokomo. . . . 2,287,475 65 
197 Peoples Trust and Savings Bank, 

Kokomo 487,598 06 

179 Starke County Trust and Savings 

Bank, Knox 562,709 71 

7 Lafayette Loan and Trust Co., 

Lafayette 2,972,698 89 

214 Peoples Loan and Trust Co., 

Lafayette 155,463 88 

33 Tippecanoe Loan and Trust Co., 

Lafayette 1, 163,794 27 

185 Lagrange County Trust Co., 

Lagrange 289,897 87 

186 Laporte Loan and Trust Co., 

Laporte. 570,398 01 

140 Peoples Trust and Savings Bank, 

Laporte 1,461,641 43 

12 Citizens Loan and Trust Co., 

Lebanon 643, 817 49 

78 Farmers and Merchants Trust 

Co., Ligonier 573,044 49 

71 Linton Trust Co., Linton 490 , 508 60 

206 Peoples Trust Co., Linton 380, 133 43 

173 The Citizens Loan and Trust Co., 

Logansport 478,741 41 

36 The Logansport Loan and Trust 

Co., Logansport 161 , 443 44 

211 Lyons Bank and Trust Co., 

Lyons 1,167,968 82 



COM PANIES— Continued 

56 Madison Safe Deposit and Trust 

Co., Madison $2, 472 330 06 

202 Citizens Trust and Savings Co., 

Marion 715, 505 00 

120 Farmers Trust and Savings Co., 

Marion 1, 739, 155 19 

35 Grant Trust and Savings Co., 

Marion 3,084,211 75 

136 Martinsville Trust Co., Martins- 
ville 472,763 81 

49 Michigan City Trust and Savings 

Bank, Michigan City 1 , 262 , 140 83 

66 First Trust and Savings Bank, 

Mishawaka 2, 326, 648 39 

67 Mishawaka Trust and Savings 

Bank, Mishawaka 1,459,541 53 

83 North Side Trust and Savings 

Bank, Mishawaka 1,046,311 03 

69 White County Trust and Savings 

Co., Monticello 433, 607 62 

• 209 Farmers Trust Co., Morgantown 76, 171 13 

92 Peoples Bank and Trust Co., 

Mount Vernon 1,231,941 38 

192 Merchants Trust and Savings 

Co., Muncie 1,997,506 06 

99 Peoples Trust Co., Muncie 1,931,016 93 

218 Farmers Loan and Trust Co. 

Nappanee 37, 441 45 

170 American Bank and Trust C6., 

New Albany 2,677,823 79 

62 Mutual Trust and Deposit Co., 

New Albany 1,349,888 43 

25 The New Albany Trust Co., 

New Albany 1, 155,939 95 

44 Central Trust and Savings Co., 

Newcastle 860, 205 55 

205 New Harmony Bank and Trust 

Co., New Harmony 368, 054 37 

174 Noblesville Trust Co., Noblesville 120,372 97 
30 Wainwright Trust Co., Nobles- 
ville 1,517,425 85 

154 Union Trust Company, North 

Manchester 388, 986 54 

115 Pendleton Trust Co., Pendleton. 284,743 27 

57 The Peru Trust Co., Peru 1,319,632 97 

59 Wabash Valley Trust Co., Peru. 1, 663, 744 09 
191 Peoples Loan and Trust Co., 

Petersburg 351,249 41 

93 Marshall County Trust and Sav- 

ings Co., Plymouth 306, 141 78 

125 Jay County Trust and Savings 

Co., Portland 330,944 71 

61 Citizens Trust and Savings Co., 

Princeton 707,881 18 

77 The Trust and Savings Bank, 

Rensselaer 707,177 28 

10 Dickinson Trust Co., Richmond 3,743,225 06 
168 American Trust and Savings 

Bank, Richmond 856,209 69 

144 Farmers Trust Co., Rising Sun.. 59,673 33 

75 United States Bank and Trust 

Co., Rochester 903,444 56 

100 The Brown Trust Co., Rockport 793,910 58 
124 Farmers Trust Co., Rushville. . . 166,911 25 
109 The Peoples Loan and Trust Co., 

Rushville 686,454 39 

21 Jackson County Loan and Trust 

Co., Seymour 708,462 97 

127 Shelby ville Trust Co., Shelby- 

ville 719,851 27 

172 The Security Trust Co., Shelby- 

ville 485,564 50 

60 American Trust Co. , South Bend 4 , 864 , 277 55 
28 Citizens Tru6t and Savings Bank, 

South Bend 3,681,127 35 

180 Farmers Trust Co., South Bend. 1,451,519 76 

217 Indiana Trust Co., South Bend.. 269,51135 
27 St. Joseph Loan and Trust Co., 

South Bend 7,780,000 05 

101 Union Trust Co., South Bend. . 2,650,456 80 
55 Citizens Trust Co., Sullivan. . . . 359,503 72 

149 Summitville Bank and Trust Co., 

Summitville 361,307 01 



Department of Banking 233 

RESOURCES OF TRUST COMPANIES— Continued 

88 Citizens Trust Co., Terre Haute. $2, 176, 193 85 150 Citizens Savings and Trust Co., 

4 The Terre Haute Trust Co., Wabash *619, 446 94 

Terre Haute 8, 528, 717 31 95 Wabash County Loan and Trust 

45 United States Trust Co., Terre Co., Wabash 1,027,463 88 

Haute 6,419,498 06 17 Indiana Loan and Trust Co., 

79 Farmers Loan and Trust Co., Warsaw 1,361,407 21 

Tipton 1,016,731 68 40 The Citizens Loan and Trust Co., 

107 Union Loan and Trust Co., Washington 478,982 98 

Union City 589, 332 33 204 American Trust and Savings 

200 Citizens Savings and Trust Co., Bank, Whiting 437, 518 87 

Valparaiso 402, 459 78 169 First Trust and Savings Bank, 

73 The First Trust Co., Valparaiso. 586, 328 76 Whiting 461, 979 63 

52 The Thrift Trust Co., Valparaiso 628,076 77 32 Peoples Loan and Trust Co., 

155 Farmers Trust Co., Van Buren. . 173, 682 00 Winchester 557, 173 21 

37 The Citizens Trust Co.,Vincennes 827,859 66 188 Union Bank and Trust Co., 

162 Knox Bank and Trust Co., Vin- Winamac 501, 517 46 

cennes 639, 034 54 198 Worthington Trust Co., Worth- 

207 Harrison Bank and Trust Co., ington 293,757 68 



Vincennes 447, 204 74 



Total $269,396,724 54 



REPORT OF BUILDING AND LOAN DEPARTMENT 

OFFICERS AND EMPLOYES 

CHARLES W. CAMP, Bank Commissioner. 

JAMES H. TOMLIN, Clerk of Building and Loan Department. 

HENRY HOCH, Examiner. 

CHARLES F. HARPER, Examiner. 

VICTOR D. MOCK, Examiner. 

HELEN JOHNSON, Stenographer. 

PROGRESS OF ASSOCIATIONS 

Sixteen new associations were organized during the year and thirty- 
six associations increased their capital stock. 

The associations of the state increased in assets during the nine 
months from December 31, 1921, to September 30, 1922, $12,910,903.37. 

They increased $56,050,000 in capitalization during the fiscal year. 

The work of building and loan associations, as shown by reports 
of the last calendar year, is represented by the building of two thou- 
sand nine hundred forty-seven homes; the improvement of three thou- 
sand four hundred three homes, and the buying of six thousand nine 
hundred seventy-six homes. 

BUILDING AND LOAN LAWS 

There should be a careful revision and codification of the building 
and loan laws, and we call special attention to fees charged for ex- 
aminations. The fees are entirely too high in the large associations 
and too low in the small associations. The fees should be adjusted 
and in the aggregate they should be lowered considerably. This may 
be done and the fees will still be ample to cover all expenses of the 
building and loan department. 

THE FOLLOWING ASSOCIATIONS ARE IN LIQUIDATION: 

Home Building and Loan Association, Wingate. 

Enterprise Building and Loan Association, Terre Haute. 

West Terre Haute Savings, Loan and Building Association, West Terre Haute. 



234 Year Book 

The Wayne International Building- and Loan Association, Richmond. 
Harbor Building and Loan Association, East Chicago. 
Citizens Building and Loan Association, Brazil. 
Union Building and Loan Association, Crothersville. 
Elberfeld Building Loan and Savings Association, Elberfeld. 

ASSOCIATIONS INCORPORATED OCTOBER 1, 1921, TO OCTOBER 1, 1922 

Authorized 

Name of Association and Location Capital 

Monon Building Loan and Savings Association, Monon $100,000 

Chesterton Rural Loan and Savings Association, Chesterton 100,000 

A. J. Huber Savings and Loan Association, Indianapolis 1,000,000 

Prudential Savings and Loan Association, Indianapolis 100,000 

United States Building and Loan Association, Indiana Harbor 50,000 

South Whitley Building and Loan Association, South Whitley 50,000 

Ferdinand Building and Savings Association, Ferdinand 200,000 

National Building and Loan Association, Hammond 200,000 

La Salle Building and Loan Association, South Bend 600,000 

Peoples Mutual Loan and Savings Association, Hammond 250,000 

Terre Haute Savings and Loan Association, Terre Haute 1,000,000 

Berne Savings and Loan Association, Berne 200,000 

Purdue Building and Loan Association, West Lafayette 1,000,000 

Peoples Building, Savings and Loan Association, Oolitic 100,000 

Lincoln Building and Loan Association, South Bend 500,000 

Oil City Savings and Loan Association, Whiting 250,000 

Total $5,700,000 

INCREASE IN CAPITAL STOCK OCTOBER 1, 1921, TO OCTOBER 1, 1922 

First Rural Loan and Savings Company, Muncie $2,000,000 

Home Building and Loan Association, Hammond 2,000,000 

West Side Building and Loan Association, Evansville 900,000 

Railroadmen's Building and Loan Association, Indianapolis 30,000,000 

First Rural Loan and Savings Association, Lebanon 1,000,000 

Colonial Savings and Loan Association, Indianapolis , 1,000,000 

Citizens Savings and Loan Association, Terre Haute 1,000,000 

Fidelity Savings and Loan Association, Evansville 1,000,000 

Hub Savings and Loan Association, Veedersburg 100,000 

Mooresville Building Savings and Loan Association, Mooresville 150,000 

Peoples Building and Loan Association, Tell City 250,000 

Scott County Building and Loan Association, Scottsburg 100,000 

Union Savings Association, Terre Haute 2,000,000 

"Valparaiso Building Loan Fund and Savings Association, Valparaiso 1,000,000 

Citizens Savings and Loan Association, Batesville 200,000 

Celtic Savings and Loan Association, Indianapolis 2,000,000 

Fletcher Avenue Savings and Loan Association, Indianapolis 4,000,000 

Kentland Building and Loan Association, Kentland 250,000 

River Park Building Loan and Savings Association, South Bend 850,000 

Madison Building and Aid Association, Madison 250,000 

Peru Building and Loan Association, Peru 500,000 

West End Building and Loan Association, Richmond 100,000 

Permanent Savings and Loan Association, Batesville 100,000 

Union Savings and Loan Association, Washington 500,000 

Crown Point Building Loan and Savings Association, Crown Point 500,000 

Franklin Loan and Savings Association, Boonville 500,000 

Mutual Building and Loan Association, Gary 750,000 

Permanent Loan and Savings Association, Evansville 1,000,000 

Frankton Building and Loan Association, Frankton 100,000 

Virginia Avenue Building and Loan Association, Indianapolis 100,000 

Central Loan Association, Terre Haute 1,000,000 

Tipton Building and Loan Association, Tipton 300,000 



Department op Banking 235 

Authorized 
Name of Association and Location Capital 

Greencastle Savings and Loan Association, Greencastle. 300,000 

Greensburg Building and Loan Association, Greensburg 250,000 

Total ." $56,050,000 

Four associations closed up their business during the year and 
three associations went into liquidation. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1922 

RECEIPTS 

Examination fees $19,338 00 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Salaries of clerk, examiners and stenographer $9,700 00 

Traveling expenses of clerk and examiners 3,171 52 

Total 12,871 52 

Gain to state over expenses $6,466 48 

EXAMINATION FEES 

(S. B. 421, Approved March 7, 1917. In effect May 31, 1917) 

Associations of less than $25,000 assets $10 00 

Associations of over $25,000 and less than $50,000 assets 15 00 

Associations of over $50,000 and less than $100,000 20 00 

For each additional $100,000 of assets or fractional part thereof 12 00 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT SHOWING IN DETAIL THE VARIOUS ITEMS OF 
ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF ALL THE BUILDING AND LOAN ASSO- 
CIATIONS OF INDIANA AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1921 

ASSETS 

Cash on hand December 31, 1921 $3,742,749 68 

Loans on mortgage security 110,051,712 90 

Loans on stock or passbook security 1,470,173 36 

Loans on other security 1,333,735 13 

Furniture and fixtures 122,199 93 

Real estate — book value 841,091 57 

Real estate sold on contract 1,321,410 02 

Sheriff's certificates and judgments 36,976 43 

Due for insurance and taxes 28,993 29 

Bonds 2,199,004 99 

Miscellaneous ; 447,333 05 

Total $121,595,380 35 

LIABILITIES 

Dues and dividends on running stock $92,511,370 85 

Paid-up and prepaid stocks and dividends 17,327,411 97 

Matured stock 2,020,322 90 

Fund for contingent losses 2,738,903 19 

Undivided profits 1,378,104 29 

Borrowed money 3,728,974 61 

Dividends unpaid 408,263 18 

Due on loans 900,204 40 

Miscellaneous 581,824 96 

Total $121,595,380 35 



236 Year Book 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION 

1. Assets of all associations September 30, 1922 $134,506,283 72 

2. Increase in assets of all associations from December 31, 1921, to Sep- 

tember 30, 1922 12,910,903 37 

3. Amount of capital stock subscribed and in force September 30, 1922. 278,324,911 00 

4. Increase of capital stock subscribed and in force from December 31, 

1921, to September 30, 1922 13,295,219 00 

5. Amount of authorized capital stock September 30, 1922 413,575,000 00 

6. Increase in authorized capital stock from December 31, 1921, to 

September 30, 1922 38,300,000 00 

7. Mortgage loans in force December 31, 1921 110,051,712 90 

8. Increase in mortgage loans in 1921 over 1920 13,984,397 06 

9. Passbook loans in force December 31, 1921 1,470,173 36 

10. Decrease in passbook loans in 1921 over 1920 71,828 19 

11. Total expenses of all associations for year ending December 31, 1921. 919,101 44 

12. Increase in expenses of 1921 over 1920 111,933 87 

13. Average cost of conducting the business of all associations of the 

state based on assets for year 1921 % of 1% 

14. Number of homes built through associations in 1921 2,947 

15. Number of homes improved through associations in 1921 3,403 

16. Number of homes bought through associations in 1921 6,976 

17. Total number of associations September 30, 1922 372 

18. Total number of borrowing members December 31, 1921 83,328 

19. Total number of investing members December 31, 1921 162,655 

20. Total membership December 31, 1921 245,983 

21. Total number of shares of stock in force December 31, 1921 2,544,847 



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252 Year Book 

REPORT OF LOAN AND CREDIT DEPARTMENT 

CHARLES W. CAMP, Bank Commissioner. 
ELMER JOHNSON, Loan and Credit Clerk. 

RECEIPTS 
License fees $27,000 00 

DISBURSEMENTS 
Salaries and expenses 2,009 66 

Net receipts ." $24,990 34 

LIST OF LICENSEES AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 1922 

American Loan Company, Princeton. 

American Loan Company, Evansville. 

American Security Company, Rushville. 

American Security Company, Kendallviile. 

American Security Company, Noblesville. 

American Security Company, Decatur. 

Auburn American Security Company, Auburn. 

American Security Company, Brazil. 

American Security Company, Wabash. 

American Loan Company, Columbus. 

American Loan Company, Indianapolis. 

American Loan Company, Franklin. 

American Loan Company, Seymour. 

American Security Company, Crawfordsville. 

American Security Company, Columbus. 

American Security Company, Seymour. 

American Security Company, Hartford City. 

American Security Company, Jeffersonville. 

American Security Company, New Albany. 

American Security Company, Goshen. 

American Security Company, Connersville. 

American Security Company, Shelbyville. 

American Security Company, Marion. 

American Security Company, Frankfort. 

Albe & Pool, Valparaiso. 

A. B. C. Loan Company, W. L. Miller, Crawfordsville. 

American Security Company, Peru. 

American Credit Company, Kokomo. 

American Credit Company, Marion. 

Arcadia Loan and Investment Company, Arcadia. 

American Security Company, Winchester. 

American Security Company, Newcastle. 

American Security Company, Elwood. 

Baum, Joseph, as Indiana Loan Company, Ft. Wayne. 

Baum, Lewis, Indianapolis. 

Barton, Nora, Frankfort. 

Brazil Loan Company, Brazil. 

Byrum, C. P., Loan & Investment Company, Kokomo, 

Beneficial Loan Society, Indianapolis. 

Business Men's Finance Association, Richmond. 

Bremen, I., Indianapolis. 

Burton Loan & Jewelry Company, Indianapolis. 

Baldwin, Hallie R., Rushville. 

Ber.eficial Loan Society, Ft. Wayne. 

Britton, Robert & Son, Roachdale. 

Blooms Loan Office, Indianapolis. 

Central Loan Company, Kokomo Central Loan Company, Kokomo. 

Central Loan Company, Kokomo Central Loan Company, Frankfort. 



Department of Banking 253 



Clapper Loan Company, Marion. 

City Loan Office, Indianapolis. 

Crescent Loan and Investment Company, Evansville. 

Capitol Loan Company, Shelbyville. 

Capitol Loan Company, Seymour. 

Capitol Loan Company, Columbus. 

Capitol Loan Company, Rushville. 

Capitol Loan Company, Batesville. 

Capitol Loan Company, Greensburg. 

Capitol Loan Company, Noblesville. 

Capitol Loan Company, Lebanon. 

Capitol Loan Company, Franklin. 

Capitol Loan Company, Frankfort. 

Capitol Loan Company, Indianapolis. 

Capitol Loan Company, Martinsville. 

Commonwealth Loan Company, Anderson. 

Commonwealth Loan Company, Newcastle. 

Commonwealth Loan Company, Ft. Wayne. 

Commonwealth Loan Company, Indianapolis. 

Commonwealth Loan Company, Richmond. 

Commonwealth Loan Company, Connersville. 

Commonwealth Loan Company, Brazil. 

Commonwealth Loan Company, Terre Haute. 

Commonwealth Loan Company, Elwood. 

Citizens Loan Company, Wabash. 

Central Finance Company, Columbus. 

Central Loan & Investment Company, Logansport. 

Clinton Finance Company, Frankfort. 

Citizens Remedial Loan Company, Muncie. 

Clapsaddle, Andrew J., Windfall. 

Connersville Remedial Loan Association, Connersville. 

Citizens Finance Company, Mishawaka. 

Central Loan Company, Weisell Baber, Peru. 

Community Loan Company, Pendleton. 

Citizens Union Loan Company, Laporte. 

Duncan, Peter O., Noblesville. 

Davis Loan & Jewelry Company, Muncie. 

Drazdowitz, Michael & Sons, Indianapolis. 

Davidson Loan & Realty Company, Marion. 

Dorfman, Sam, Indianapolis. 

Equitable Loan Company, Ft. Wayne. 

Elkhart Commercial & Finance Corporation, Elkhart. 

Fidelity Loan Company, Indianapolis. 

Fayette Chattel Loan Company, Miami Loan Company, Connersville. 

Fidelity Loan Company, Claud H. Statton, Sullivan. 

First Security Company, Union City. 

Frank, Louis, South Bend. 

Farmland Investment Company, Boonville. 

Funk, Edward B., Princeton. 

Fogel, Louis, Indianapolis. 

Farmers Loan Company, Danville. 

Farmers Mortgage Loan & Securities Company, Newcastle. 

Farmers Investment Company, Scottsburg. 

Greene County Loan Company, Linton. 

Goldman, Moses, Evansville. 

Hawkins, D. P., as Indiana Loan Company, Hartford City. 

Hawkins, D. P., as Indiana Loan Company, Lafayette. 

Hawkins, D. P., as Indiana Loan Company, Muncie. 

Hancock, E. F., Indianapolis. 

Howard Loan Company, Kokomo. 

Homsper, J. F., Columbus. 

Hopkins, Arthur H., Rensselaer. 

Home & Norris, Anderson. 



254 Year Book 

Hahn, Sadie, Evansville. 

Home Loan & Savings Company, Portland. 

Hawkins Mortgage Company, Portland. 

Huntington Securities Company, Huntington. 

Indiana Collateral Loan Company, Indianapolis. 

Indiana Finance Company, Elkhart. 

Indianapolis Finance Company, Indianapolis. 

Indiana Finance Company, South Bend. 

Indiana Loan Company, Terre Haute. 

Indiana Loan Company, Greencastle. 

Indianapolis Public Welfare Loan Association, Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis Company, Indianapolis. 

Interstate Collateral Loan Company, Indianapolis. 

Jefferson Loan Company, Madison. 

Jefferson Loan Company, New Albany. 

Jefferson Loan Company, Versailles. 

Judy, John F., Judy ville ( Fountain County) . 

Judy, John F., Judy ville (Warren County) . 

Jefferson Loan Company, Vevay. 

Kokomo Central Loan Company as Central Loan Company, Tipton. 

Kokomo Investment & Loan Company, Kokomo. 

Knox County Real Estate & Loan Company, Vincennes. 

Keim, H. J., Marion. 

Kaiser, John, Wabash. 

Korn, Jos. M., South Bend. 

Kitch, C. S., Company, Fort Wayne. 

Legal Loan Company, Marion. 

Legal Rate Loan Company, Legal Loan Company, Kokomo. 

Legal Loan Company as Miami Loan Company, Winamac. 

Legal Loan Company as Miami Loan Company, Monticello. 

Legal Loan Company as Miami Loan Company, Delphi. 

Legal Loan Company as Miami Loan Company, Logansport. 

Legal Loan Association as Legal Loan Company, Lafayette. 

Leavell & Bates, Tipton. 

Logansport Remedial Loan Association, Logansport. 

Lesser, Charles J., Hammond. 

Liberal Loan Society, Bluffton. 

Marion Loan Company, Marion. 

Marion Loan Company, Wabash 

Miami Loan Company as Indiana Loan Company, Logansport. 

Miami Loan Company as Peru Chattel Loan Company, Peru. 

Monks, Edgar L., Winchester. 

Morrison, Corydon W., Greenfield. 

Madison Finance Company, Madison. 

Martinsville Discount Corporation, Martinsville. 

Meek, Jethro C, Greensburg. 

Muncie Loan Company, Muncie. 

Medias, Charles, Indianapolis. 

Merriman, Mayme E., Frankfort. 

Madison Remedial Loan Association, Anderson. 

Milligan Finance Company, Fort Wayne. 

Milligan & Company, Portland. 

Martinsville Discount Corporation, Bloomington. 

Newcastle Loan Company, Newcastle. 

Newcastle Remedial Loan Association, Newcastle. 

Onkin, Ben, Terre Haute. 

Osterday, Henry W., Mulberry. 

Orange County Security Company, Paoli. 

O'Brien, John D., Marion. 

O'Brien, Michael, Bedford. 

Olshewitz, Mora, Indianapolis. 

Peoples Collateral Loan Company, Ft. Wayne. 

Prudential Loan Company, Anderson. 



Department of Banking 255 



Peoples Finance Company, Ft. Wayne. 

Provident Loan Association, South Bend. 

Provident Loan Association, Michigan City. 

Provident Loan Association, Valparaiso. 

Provident Loan Association, Elkhart. 

Provident Loan Association, Hammond. 

Plymouth Finance Company, Plymouth. 

Prudential Loan & Investment Company, South Bend. 

Princeton Finance Company, Princeton. 

Pursel, S. R., Greencastle. 

Prudential Loan & investment Company, Richmond. 

Peoples Loan Company, Franklin. 

Peoples Loan Company, Shelbyville. 

Peoples Loan Company, Greensburg. 

Peoples Loan Company, Anderson. 

Palmer, Alex, New Albany. 

Remedial System of Loaning, Evansville. 

Rochester Discount Corporation, Rochester. 

Reliable Loan Company, Elwood. 

Rosenfeld, Morris, Terre Haute. 

Rose, A. G., Martinsville. 

Reliable Loan Office, Indianapolis. 

Rubin, Nathan M„ Terre Haute. 

Scudder, Omer, Columbus. 

Shank Investment Company, Ft. Wayne. 

State Loan Company, Laporte. 

State Loan Company, South Bend. 

Security Mortgage Loan Company, Indianapolis. 

Smith, Walter E., Rushville. 

Security Loan Company, South Bend. 

Security Loan Company, Clinton. 

Security Loan Company, Rockville. 

Security Loan Company, Sullivan, 

Security Loan Company, Terre Haute. 

Security Loan Company, Goshen. 

Security Loan Company, Plymouth. 

Security Loan Company, Warsaw. 

Sussman, Wolf, Indianapolis. 

State Investment & Loan Company, Richmond. 

Swank, Wm. A., Veedersburg. 

Swank, Wm. A., Crawfordsville. 

Swank, Wm. A., Lebanon. 

State Mortgage & Finance Company, Gary 

Security Finance Company, Ft. Wayne. 

Security Loan Company, Knox. 

Storer, O. W., Marion. 

Storer, O. W., Connersville. 

Storer, O. W., Terre Haute. 

Storer, O. W., Kokomo. 

Storer, O. W., Ft. Wayne. 

Storer, O. W., Muncie. 

Storer, O. W., Indianapolis. 

Storer, O. W., Newcastle. 

Storer, O. W., Anderson. 

Sterchi, Sam, Terre Haute. 

Seligman, Jake, Indianapolis. 

Seligman, Abe, Indianapolis. 

Sasse, Herman E., Gary. 

Tavel, Maurice, Indianapolis. 

Tavel Brothers, Indianapolis. 

Tavel Brothers, Indianapolis. 

Thomas, Fred V., Corporation, Greencastle. 

Valley Loan Company, Huntington. 



256 Year Book 

Wolf & Harlem, Mt. Vernon. 
Willis Dean Loan Company, Marion. 
Wood, William L., Rensselaer. 
Welfare Loan Society, Michigan City. 
Welfare Loan Society, Anderson. 
Welfare Loan Society, Richmond. 
Welfare Loan Society, South Bend. 
Welfare Loan Society, Vincennes. 
Welfare Loan Society, Terre Haute. 
Welfare Loan Society, New Albany. 
Welfare Loan Society, Indianapolis. 
Welfare Loan Society, Ft. Wayne. 
Welfare Loan Society, Muncie. 
Welfare Loan Society, Marion. 
Welfare Loan Society, Logansport. 
Welfare Loan Society, Kokomo. 
Welfare Loan Society, Lafayette. 
Welfare Loan Society of Elkhart, Elkhart. 
Wood, Freeman M., Lafayette. 
Wood, Freeman M., Williamsport. 
Wood, Freeman M., Oxford. 
Wilson, Arthur N„ Indianapolis. 
Zimmerman, W. D., Princeton. 



REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 



MEMBERS OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

JOHN H. HEWITT, M. D., President, Terre Haute. 
HUGH A. COWING, M. D., Vice-president, Muncie. 
J. N. HURTY, M. D., Secretary, Indianapolis. 
CHARLES B. KERN, M. D., Lafayette. 
ADAH McMAHAN, M. D., Lafayette. 

PERSONNEL OF SUPERINTENDENTS OF DIVISIONS 

W. F. KING, M. D., Assistant Secretary, Director Division of Venereal 

Diseases. 
I. L. MILLER, A. B., Superintendent Division of Chemistry and State 

Food and Drug Commissioner. 
L. A. GEUPEL, B. S., Sanitary Engineer. 

WILLIAM SHIMER, M. D., Superintendent of Laboratory of Hygiene. 
ADA E. SCHWEITZER, M. D., Director Division of Infant and Child 

Hygiene. 
H. W. McKANE, M. D., Director Division of Tuberculosis. 
H. M. WRIGHT, Director Division of Vital Statistics. 
W. F. SHARPE, Director Division of Housing. 
INA GASKILL, Director Division of Nursing. 

H. R. CONDREY, Accountant, Director Division of School Hygiene. 
L. J. RAIL, State Investigator. 

REVIEW OF ACTIVITIES DURING THE YEAR ENDING 
SEPTEMBER 30, 1922. 

The board held four regular and twelve special meetings, as fol- 
lows: 

Regular quarterly meeting, October 12, 1921. 
Regular quarterly meeting, January 11, 1922. 
Regular quarterly meeting, April 12, 1922. 
Regular quarterly meeting, July 19, 1922. 
Special meeting, February 13, 1922. 
Special meeting, February 14, 1922. 
Special meeting, February 15, 1922. 
Special meeting, February 16, 1922. 
Special meeting, February 17, 1922. 
Special meeting, February 18, 1922. 
Special meeting, March 17, 1922. 
Special meeting, May 19, 1922. 
Special meeting, June 6, 1922. 
Special meeting, June 20, 1922. 
Special meeting, August 3, 1922. 
Special meeting, September 22, 1922. 

ABSTRACT OF PROCEEDINGS OF ABOVE MEETINGS AS FOLLOWS 

Regular quarterly meeting October 12, 1921. The Secretary re- 
ported that a model sanitary ordinance had been sent to all mayors 
and health officers of cities, together with a letter urging the adoption 

17—22978 (257) 



258 Year Book 

and enforcement of the ordinance. Reports from the various divisions 
and departments were received. Mr. Frank C. Wilson of Norfolk, 
Nebraska, a graduate bacteriologist, with a degree of B. S. from the 
State University of Kansas, was appointed director of the Traveling 
Milk Laboratory, which had been established by the State Board of 
Health September 28, 1921. The ordinary routine business of the board 
was attended to. 

Regular quarterly meeting January 11, 1922. Reports from vari- 
ous divisions and departments were received and considered. Con- 
sideration was given to the Sheppard-Towner Act passed by Congress 
with an appropriation of $10,000 to states accepting the provisions of 
the act through the Governor, and a plan of activity through the Infant 
and Child Hygiene Division was presented by the Secretary. It was 
ordered that a copy of this plan should be submitted to the Children's 
Bureau at Washington for approval. Dr. George P. Paul, representing 
the International Health Board, made his report and presented a plan 
for co-operation between the International Health Board and the State 
Board of Health in establishing an all-time health department in not 
to exceed three counties of the state. It was shown that an agreement 
had been made with the county commissioners of Fulton County, and 
also with the county commissioners of Gibson County, for the establish- 
ing of full-time health service. Secretary was ordered to continue 
negotiations with these two counties and to carry out the co-operative 
plan at the earliest possible time. It was ordered that the regular 
annual meeting of the health officers be held in Indianapolis, February 
15 and 16, in conjunction with the health institute to be held at that 
time under the auspices of the Indiana State Board of Health, U. S. 
Public Health Service, and the Indiana University School of Medicine. 
The Secretary reported that the quarantine heretofore maintained in 
the case of Robert Burdine, his wife, and daughter, all of whom had 
been in quarantine for fourteen months on account of leprosy, had been 
discharged because proof had been submitted that all symptoms of the 
disease in Robert Burdine had passed and he was pronounced free from 
the infection of leprosy. Mr. Frank C. Wilson reported survey made 
of the milk supply of Huntington, Indiana. The following schoolhouses 
were condemned after a thorough consideration of the sanitary surveys 
of the same made in the regular way. 

Gibson County, Haubstadt School, Johnson Township. 
Jefferson County, District 1, Monroe Township. 
Jefferson County, District 2, Monroe Township, Big Creek School. 
Jefferson County, District 3, Monroe Township, Marble School. 
Jefferson County, District 4, Monroe Township, Wood School. 
Jefferson County, District 5, Monroe Township, Oakdale School. 

Jefferson County, District 6, Honroe Township, . 

Jefferson County, District 7, Monroe Township, Hebron School. 
Jefferson County, District 9, Monroe Township, Baxter School. 
Jefferson County, District 10, Monroe Township, Swartz School. 
Jefferson County, Lower Seminary School, Madison, Madison Township. 
Madison County, District 3, Chesterfield School, Union Township. 
Miami County, District 2, Pipe Creek Township, Rife School. 
Miami County, District 3, Pipe Creek Township, Nead School. 
Miami County, District 5, Pipe Creek Township, Stroupe School. 
Vigo County, District 2, Rogers School, Honey Creek Township. 



State Board op Health 259 

Wabash County, Old High School, North Manchester, Indiana. 
Miami County, District 4, Pipe Creek Township, Cripe School. 
Clay County, District 2, Buffaloville, Clay Township. 

Special meetings were held February 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17 in con- 
junction with the Public Health Institute. The following resolution in 
regard to the institute was adopted by the board. Ordered: The Indian- 
apolis Public Health Institute is herewith declared a great success, well 
worth the effort and the cost. The members have had much pleasure and 
profit in participating, in speaking and in acting as presiding officers 
on different days. 

Special meeting March 17, 1922. The object of this meeting was 
to consider the purpose of the Indiana Health Exposition to be held 
at the State Fair Grounds May 19 to 27. After full consideration the 
board endorsed the exposition and urged full co-operation by the State 
Board of Health. 

Regular quarterly meeting April 12, 1922. Reports of the Secre- 
tary, Assistant Secretary, and heads of the various divisions were re- 
ceived and considered. After a review and careful consideration of the 
regular sanitary surveys made, the following schools were condemned, 
condemnation to be effective June 15, 1922: 

Spencer County, Ohio Township, District No. 1. 

Spencer County, Ohio Township, District No. 2. 

Spencer County, Ohio Township, District No. 5. 

Spencer County, Ohio Township, District No. 6. 

Spencer County, Ohio Township, District No. 9. 

Spencer County, Ohio Township, District No. 15. 

Dekalb County, Stafford Township, District No. 1. 

Dekalb County, Stafford Township, District No. 2. 

Dekalb County, Stafford Township, District No. 3. 

Dekalb County, Stafford Township, District No. 15. 

Dekalb County, Stafford Township, Wartenbee School. 

Madison County, Adams Township, District No. 1. 

Madison County, Adams Township, District No. 2. 

Madison County, Adams Township, District No. 3. 

Madison County, Adams Township, District No. 4. 

Madison County, Adams Township, District No. 5. 

Madison County, Adams Township, District No. 6. 

Jackson County, Grassy Fork Township, District No. 4, Tampico School. 

Switzerland County, Posey Township, Riverside School. 

Switzerland County, Posey Township, Quercus Grove School. 

Elkhart County, Osola Township, District No. 1. 

Elkhart County, Osola Township, District No. 2. 

Elkhart County, Osola Township, District No. 4. 

Elkhart County, Center Township, District No. 4. 

Elkhart County, Clinton Township, District No. 10, Young America School. 

Marion County, Annex to School No. 42, Indianapolis. 

Miss Flora A. Dutcher, nurse attached to the Division of Tubercu- 
losis, was given leave of absence without pay to take a post-graduate 
course in nursing. The Secretary was directed to employ women lec- 
turers and organizers for the purpose of effecting a state-wide organiza- 
tion of the women's council on social hygiene and in this way to pro- 
mote the work of the Bureau of Venereal Diseases, said lecturers to 
serve without pay, but with traveling expenses paid from the appro- 
priations of the Bureau of Venereal Diseases, upon order of the director 



260 Year Book 

of that bureau. Regular routine business of the quarter was at- 
tended to. 

Special meeting May 19, 1922. This meeting was held in con- 
nection with the opening of the Indiana Health Exposition at the Fair 
Ground. At the opening of the exposition Governor McCray delivered 
an address and a statue of Hygeia unveiled. The battery from Fort 
Harrison fired salute and the Fort Harrison band played the "Star- 
Spangled Banner," and the exposition was officially declared open. The 
Secretary reported that every requirement of the Children's Bureau 
at Washington had been complied with and that the plan of activity 
and co-operation under the provisions of the Sheppard-Towner Act had 
been accepted and approved by the Children's Bureau. The Secretary 
also stated that as soon as the allotment to the State of Indiana from 
the federal appropriation was received actual infant hygiene and ma- 
ternity welfare work would begin. 

Special meeting June 6, 1922. The board received the resignation 
of Dr. William Shimer as Superintendent of the Laboratory of Hygiene 
and considered applications for appointment to this position. After 
due consideration Dr. A. G. Long of Cambridge, Massachusetts, was 
appointed to take up the work July 16. A committee consisting of the 
President and Secretary was appointed to wait upon the Governor and 
consult with him concerning the making of a rural survey of one agri- 
cultural county in the state through the Division of Housing, the pur- 
pose of said survey to be to secure reliable data regarding sociological, 
medical, and sanitary conditions in a typical agricultural county in the 
state. The following schoolhouses were condemned, condemnation to be 
effective June 5, 1922, after thorough consideration and review of the 
sanitary surveys made of these buildings: 

Bartholomew County, Clay Township, District No. 2. 

Bartholomew County, Clay Township, District No. 3. 

Bartholomew County, Clay Township, District No. 4. 

Bartholomew County, Clay Township, District No. 5. 

Bartholomew County, Sand Creek Township, District No. 4. 

Bartholomew County, Sand Creek Township, District No. 5. 

Bartholomew County, Sand Creek Township, District No. 6. 

Vigo County, Prairie Creek Township, District No. 1. 

Vigo County, Prairie Creek Township, District No. 2. 

Vigo County, Prairie Creek Township, District No. 3. 

Vigo County, Prairie Creek Township, District No. 4. 

Vigo County, Prairie Creek Township, District No. 5. 

Wayne County, Boston Township, District No. 2. 

Hancock County, Vernon Township, District No. 7, Cushman School. 

Hancock County, Vernon Township, District No. 5, Cook School. 

Martin County, Lost River Township, District No. 6. 

Orange County, Jackson Township, District No. 1. 

Orange County, Jackson Township, District No. 6. 

Clay County, Sugar Ridge Township, District No. 6. 

Jasper County, Walker Township, District No. 4. 

Jasper County, Walker Township, District No. 5. 

Marshall County, Tippecanoe Township, District No. 4. 

Steuben County, Jackson Township. District No. 1. 

Steuben County, Jackson Township, District No. 2. 

Steuben County, Jackson Township, District No. 4. 

Steuben County, Jackson Township, District No. 6. 

Steuben County, Jackson Township, District No. 7. 



State Board of Health 261 

Steuben County, Jackson Township, District No. 9. 
Tipton County, Jefferson Township, District No. 10. 
Brown County, Jackson Township, District No. 2. 
Whitley County, Troy Township, District No. 1. 
Whitley County, Troy Township, District No. 2. 
Whitley County, Troy Township, District No. 3. 
Whitley County, Troy Township, District No. 4. 
Whitley County, Troy Township, District No. 6. 

Special meeting June 20, 1922. This meeting was held at the In- 
diana State Sanatorium at Rockville, and was for the purpose of making 
the annual sanitary inspection of the State Sanatorium as commanded 
in the statutes. A report of this survey is on file with the board and 
a copy submitted to the Governor. 

Regular quarterly meeting July 19, 1922. Reports from various 
divisions and departments were received and considered. The Secre- 
tary reported the establishment of an all-time health officer's service 
in Fulton County. This service is made possible through the co-opera- 
tion of the International Health Board, the State Board of Health, and 
the Board of County Commissioners of Fulton County. Dr. Arthur L. 
Oilar of Anderson, formerly director of the venereal disease clinic at 
Anderson, was appointed as full-time health officer for Fulton County, 
and began his services on June 1. The Secretary also made a report 
of the Indiana Health Exposition, which had been held at the Fair 
Grounds May 19 to 29. The Secretary also presented the report of a 
sanitary survey made by the State Board of Health of the Indiana 
State Sanatorium at Rockville on June 20. This report, copy of which 
had been approved by the Governor, is of record in the minutes of the 
State Board of Health. Dr. J. N. Hurty, who had been Secretary of 
the State Board of Health since March 12, 1896, presented his resignation 
to the State Board of Health, the same to become effective September 
30, 1922. This resignation was accepted by the board. The usual 
routine business of the board was given attention. 

Special meeting August 3, 1922. Dr. W. F. King, Assistant Sec- 
retary of the State Board of Health, was appointed Secretary, his term 
of office to begin October 1, 1922. Various other matters pertaining to 
the work of the different departments and divisions and to condemnation 
of school buildings was given attention by the board. 

Special meeting September 22, 1922. The board gave a hearing to 
the committee representing taxpayers and patrons of Washington Town- 
ship, Delaware County, in reference to permission to use the present 
condemned school building in Gaston, in said township, for school pur- 
poses. After full consideration of the information and arguments pre- 
sented by the committee, the whole matter was laid upon the table. A 
report of the committee of the board, consisting of Dr. Hewitt, Dr. 
McMahan, Dr. Hurty, on reorganization of the Division of Infant and 
Child Hygiene, was presented, considered, and by order of the board the 
work of the committee was continued. Report was made by Mr. L. A. 
Geupel, Sanitary Engineer of the State Board of Health, on the matter 
of sewage disposal of the city of Frankfort. After consideration of this 
report it was ordered that a meeting be arranged with the mayor, city 
council, and board of health of the city of Frankfort in an effort to 



262 Year Book 

adjust matters at issue. The ordinary routine business of the board 
was given attention. 



REPORT OF LABORATORY OF HYGIENE, OCTOBER 1, 1921, TO 
SEPTEMBER 30, 1922 

DIVISION OF BACTERIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY 

PERSONNEL 

WILLIAM SHIMER, A. B., M. D., Director (Resigned June 1, 1922) 

ALFRED G. LONG, M. D., C. P. H., Director. 

J. P. NICODEMUS, M. D., Assistant Pathologist. 

MISS CARRIE C. SMITH, B. S., Bacteriologist. 

MR. JOHN VIE, Serologist. 

MISS HERVEY M. HOOKER, Clerk. 

MISS RAE BUNDY, Stenographer. 

MISS RUTH FEHR, Scientific Assistant (left October 1, 1922). 

MISS ALICE HEWITT, Scientific Assistant. 

MISS MARGARET EBLER, Scientific Assistant. ■• 

MR. R. P. JOHNSON, Technical Assistant. 

MRS. NELLIE SHINN, Janitress. 

MISS DAILY, Serologist (left April 15, 1922) . 

MRS. SMALL, Serologist (left July 1, 1922). 

MISS CLAPP, Scientific Assistant (left February 15, 1922). 

MR. WM. WINCHESTER, Scientific Assistant (left April 30, 1922). 

The work of this division is steadily growing, as reference to the 
appended tables will demonstrate. It is unfortunate that there has been 
such a continuous change in the working staff. The more teamwork 
there is in an office such as this, the better the final results, especially 
as the persons employed have had at best a very incomplete prelim- 
inary training and only by working together is it possible for this work 
to be of much value. 

Of the different aspects of the work we might deal with sputum 
examinations first. These vary greatly in number from day to day but 
tend more or less to be routine in character for sanatoriums and a few 
men who are specializing in chest work. The preliminary treatment of 
the specimens with antiformin is of especial value in these cases, as it 
makes the detection of small numbers of bacilli possible and so assists 
in the treatment of patients who are under observation. 

The Wassermann work runs closely to 100 tests daily and takes the 
full time of one person. Fifty per cent of the specimens come from 
the various free clinics, 47 per cent are from private physicians and the 
remainder from state institutions. The antigen used is supplied from 
the hygienic laboratory in Washington; we make our own amboceptor, 
and keep our own guinea-pigs, but buy our sheep's blood from a local 
slaughter house. By daily titrations of the complement and amboceptor 
and the adoption of the icebox fixation method we are doing a test now 
which ought to be free from adverse criticism. The examination of pus 



State Board of Health 263 

smears for gonococci is also a large item of our work; a good deal of 
the work also comes from the clinics. 

Our diphtheria work has been very heavy, as reference to the re- 
ports will show. A great deal of this is due to carelessness on the part 
of parents as well as health officers. The child is sick, the parents don't 
call a physician till other cases develop. Strict quarantine by the health 
officer and immunization of contacts will stop any outbreak in its in- 
fancy. To try and attain this end, special outfits were prepared and 
sent to seventy-three nurses who do school work in the counties and 
special literature was prepared and sent to five hundred health officers. 

In connection with the outbreaks of typhoid fever at Warsaw and 
Greenfield, this laboratory furnished many Widal outfits and the director 
visited Greenfield twice, inspecting dairies and food stores and taking 
samples of well water. In both instances milk was found to be the 
vehicle of infection. 

Mention should also be made of the public health exhibit in which 
this division took part. Some pathological specimens were shown and 
two large display signs were prepared showing the amount and variety 
of work done in the past year. It is difficult for a department such as 
this to prepare an exhibit which conveys any definite idea to the lay 
mind of the scope and diversity of its operations. 

The diagnosis of tumors and miscellaneous pathological material 
submitted for examination has continued much as usual. 

The head of this division acts also as collaborating epidemiologist 
for the U. S. Public Health Service. In this connection we may say 
that an earnest endeavor has been made to obtain weekly reports from 
city, county and town health officers. The majority of these report 
more or less regularly, but some are too busy or too careless to bother 
to let the rest of the state know how healthful a spot their particular 
territory is to live in. From reports so received and from the results 
of examinations in the laboratory, together with newspaper reports, it 
is possible to head off an epidemic before it reaches any size. 

The preparation and distribution of outfits has reached such dimen- 
sions that some mention should be made of this work. One man is kept 
busy doing nothing else and part-time assistance will be needed in this 
department very soon, especially in the winter months. 

SPECIMENS EXAMINED 

1919 1920 1921 1922 

Sputum 7.646 8,321 12,478 9,601 

Diphtheria cultures 5,012 5,778 11,167 23,778 

Blood for Widals 2,368 1,399 1,412 1,233 

Blood for Wassermanns 5,028 14,935 19,881 25,042 

Blood for malaria '. 98 182 180 84 

Brains for rabies 89 82 90 107 

Pus for gonococci 3,923 7,941 5,651 5,096 

Tissues for diagnosis 269 293 346 298 

Miscellaneous 879 286 460 271 

Total number 25,312 .39,217 51,665 65,510 



264 



Year Book 



PASTEUR TREATMENT 
J. P. NICODEMUS, Physician. 
ALICE HEWITT, Attendant. 

This department has administered prophylactic treatment to forty- 
nine persons the past year. It has been felt that in many instances this 
treatment has been given where the indications were too indefinite to 
warrant it, but still, for the peace of mind of the parents or friends, 
and to prevent the possible development of the disease the usual course 
of treatment was carried out. As in previous years, no untoward ef- 
fects were reported while the patient was under observation. It is felt 
by us that patients should be considered as hospital cases, especially 
those whose homes are out of the city, as their actions and mode of 
living are difficult to control in a hotel. 

The accompanying tables give interesting information as to the 
parts of the state where definitely rabid animals have been found, and 
from what parts the patients come who have received treatment. 

PATIENTS TREATED 



Name 



Town 



County 



Sex 


Age 


M 


35 


F 


53 


M 


2 


F 


14 


F 


39 


M 


2 


F 


26 


M 


9 


M 


33 


F 


21 


M 


33 


M 


13 


F 


40 


M 


3 


M 


18 


F 


47 


F 


7 


M 


29 


M 


51 


M 


31 


M 


6 


M 


4 


I 


5 


F 


29 


M 


5 


M 


4 


M 


3 


M 


7 


P 


32 


F 


22 


M 


3 


M 


43 


F 


33 


M 


11 


M 


5 


M 


6 


M 


11 


F 


27 


M 


55 


F 


21 


F 


10 


M 


3 


M 


27 


M 


4 


F 


11 


M 


8 


F 


11 


F 


3 


M 


15 



Treatment 
Began 



Treatment 
Finished 



Charlie Coulter 

Roena Temple 

Chas. H. Dickman 

Marie Armstrong 

Emma Proctor 

Joe Meredith 

Mrs. Ruth Meredith — 

Muriel Winters 

John C. Stringer 

Georgia Coleman 

Harry Cohen 

SigelKemp 

Mrs. J. H. McClellan... 
Richard Leon Carney. . . 

Edward Elmore 

Martha J. Rethmeyer. . . 

Nora May Burdine 

F. M. McKinstray 

Theodore Wachstetter . , 

Lawrence Johnson 

Wayne Spencer 

Robert Harrah 

Mary Harrah 

Pearl Calvert 

Raymond Medsker 

Charles Broderick 

Bernard Broderick 

John Lewis Kent, Jr. . . . 

Mrs. L. Broderick 

Mrs. J. J. Eilers 

Joseph Eilers. 

George Marquett 

Manda Jane Norrington 
William Aemmer. ...... 

Austin Jackson 

Herbert Wells 

Noble Kerr 

Mrs.V.V.Stoner...... 

John Hale. 

Mrs. E. F. Spatig 

Ilene Mitchell 

Thomas A. Jackson 

Claude Maxey 

Michael Edmonds. 

Mary Frances Grubbs. . 

Ralph lies 

Marie Osterman 

Florence Rodemund 

Chauncey Parker 



Indianapolis 

Greenfield 

Greenfield 

Indianapolis 

Dugger 

Dugger 

Dugger 

Dugger 

Dugger 

Princeton 

Princeton 

New Albany 

Indianapols 

Indianapolis. . . . 

Terre Haute 

Cumberland 

Indianapolis 

Fishers 

Indinaapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

New Albany.... 

New Albany 

Oaklandon 

Parr 

Austin 

Indianapolis .... 

Hymera.. 

Jeffersonville 

Linton 

Indianapolis .... 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Jeffersonville.... 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis. ... 



Marion . . 
Hanocck. 
Hancock . 
Marion . . 
Sullivan.. 
Sullivan . . 
Sullivan.. 
Sullivan.. 
Sullivan.. 
Gibson... 
Gibson... 
Floyd.... 
Marion. . 
Marion. . 

Vigo 

Marion.. 
Marion . . 
Hamilton 
Marion.. 
Marion. . 
Marion.. 
Marion.. 
Marion.. 
Marion . . 
Marion. . 
Marion . . 
Marion.. 
Marion.. 
Marion.. 
Marion . . 
Marion. . 
Marion. . 

Floyd 

Floyd.... 
Marion.., 
Jasper. . . 

Scott 

Marion.. 
Sullivan.. 
Clark.... 
Greene... 
Marion . . 
Marion . . , 
Marion. . 
Clark.... 
Marion. . 
Marion.., 
Marion. . 
Marion . . 



Oct. 11, 1921 
Nov. 12, 1921 
Nov. 12, 1921 
Nov. 26, 1921 
Nov. 29, 1921 
Nov. 30, 1921 
Nov. 30, 1921 
Dec. 1,1921 
Dec. 2,1921 
Dec. 30, 1921 
Dec. 30, 1921 
Mar. 10, 1922 
Apr. 19, 1922 
Apr. 19, 1922 
May 1,1922 
May 3,1922 
May 10, 1922 
May 18, 1922 
May 18, 1922 
May 18, 1922 
May 22, 1922 
May 23, 1922 
May 23, 1922 
May 26, 1922 
May 26, 1922 
May 26, 1922 
May 26, 1922 
May 27, 1922 
May 28, 1922 
May 28, 1922 
May 31, 1922 
June 1, 1922 
June 8, 1922 
June 8, 1922 
June 14, 1922 
June 10, 1922 
June 27, 1922 
July 12, 1922 
July 18, 1922 
July 18, 1922 
July 20, 1922 
July 26, 1922 
Aug. 4, 1922 
Aug. 8, 1922 
Aug. 8, 1922 
Aug. 21, 1922 
Sept. 1, 1922 
Sept. 19, 1922 
Sept. 20, 1922 



Oct. 17, 1921 
Nov. 29, 1921 
Nov. 29, 1921 
Dec. 13, 1921 
Dec. 16, 1921 
Dec. 17, 1921 
Dec. 17, 1921 
Dec. 18, 1921 
Dec. 9,1921 
Jan. 16, 1922 
Jan. 16, 1922 
Mar. 27, 1922 
May 3,1922 
May 3,1922 
May 18, 1922 
May 19, 1922 
May 16, 1922 
May 24, 1922 
May 24, 1922 
May 24, 1922 
June 7, 1922 
June 8, 1922 
June 8, 1922 
June 11, 1922 
June 11, 1922 
June 11, 1922 
June 11, 1922 
June 2, 1922 
June 3, 1922 
June 3, 1922 
June 6, 1922 
June 7, 1922 
June 25, 1922 
June 25, 1922 
June 20, 1922 
June 27, 1922 
July 14, 1922 
July 18, 1922 
Aug. 4,1922 
July 24, 1922 
July 26, 1922 
Aug. 1, 1922 
Aug. 10, 1922 
Aug. 14, 1922 
Aug. 25, 1922 
Aug. 27, 1922 
Sept. 18, 1922 
Sept. 25, 1922 
Oct. 9, 1922 



State Board of Health 265 

REPORT OF THE CHEMICAL DIVISION OF THE LABORATORY 

OF HYGIENE 

I. L. MILLER, Chemist 

Indiana State Board of Health. 

State Food and Drug Commissioner. 

State Commissioner of Weights and Measures. 

Superintendent Oil Inspection. 

laboratory staff 

V. C. STARNER, Food and Drug Chemist. 

H. F. REINHARD, Assistant Food and Drug Chemist. 

L. A. GEUPEL, Director of Water and Sewage Department. 

H. W. DEUKER, Water Chemist and B aster iologist.* 

LELAH BARNES, Assistant Water Chemist and Basteriologist. 

B. H. JEUP, Water Chemist and Bacteriologist. 
MARION S. CAMPBELL, Assistant Water Chemist. 

FRANK C. WILSON, Milk Bacteriologist, in charge Traveling Milk 

Laboratory. 
MARY LOFTUS, Custodian of Laboratories. 

INSPECTION STAFF 

A. W. BRUNER. O. T. LAW. 

C. L. HUTCHENS. J. W. STOKES. 
G. W. FRITSCHE. F. W. TUCKER. 

RICHARD WHITE. 

OFFICE STAFF 

EDITH L. HOFFMAN, Chief Clerk. 
BERNICE GARNER, Clerk. 
ADA FOX, Clerk. 

The Chemical Division of the Laboratory of Hygiene was established 
by the State Board of Health in 1905 under a legislative act of that 
year. Other laws enacted since that time have added new duties and 
have very largely extended the scope of its work. The division is now 
charged with the enforcement of all laws relating to the sanitation, 
adulteration and misbranding of foods and drugs; of weights and meas- 
ures laws applicable to all common commodities of trade and all laws 
relating to the operation and purification of public and private water 
supplies and to sewage disposal so far as it affects health and living 
conditions. These various laws are administered through four well- 
defined and well-organized departments, namely, food and drugs, water 
and sewage, weights and measures, and oil inspection. The policy of 
the various departments of the division has always been co-operative 
rather than strictly regulative. Success has been measured by improved 
conditions in sanitation of food and drug handling establishments, purer 
foods and drugs, better water supplies and cleaner cities, rather than 
by a long list of victorious prosecutions of offenders. With but few 

♦Resigned. 



266 Year Book 

exceptions generous and effective co-operation has been extended by per- 
sons and associations affected by the laws and regulations administered 
by the division. 

REPORT OF THE FOOD AND DRUG DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Foods and Drugs administers the pure food and 
drug law which defines adulteration, misbranding, unsanitary conditions 
in slaughterhouses, and fixes milk standards; the sanitary food law, 
which defines unsanitary conditions in all food manufacturing and food 
distributing establishments and sets forth certain definite requirements 
of building construction; the cold storage law, which provides for the 
licensing of cold storage plants, specifies time and conditions of the 
storage of perishable foods and regulates the sale of cold storage eggs; 
the model bakery law, which regulates the sanitation of bakeries, the 
health requirements of employes, and fixes the standard weight for 
loaves of bread. 

In addition to these may be mentioned the renovated butter law, 
the clean milk can law, requiring the proper cleansing of all receptacles 
used in the handling of all dairy products, and the linseed oil law. The 
provisions and requirements of these laws are generally acceptable to 
the trades and businesses affected, and compliance with them, at least 
in spirit, has become almost universal. 

The department is largely engaged in educating those who are con- 
tinually entering one phase or the other of the food and drug business, 
and who are not familiar with the laws. It has been gratifying to note 
that larger numbers of persons apply each succeeding year for infor- 
mation regarding new businesses or the launching of new enterprises. 
Department records show that in many cases large sums would have 
been saved if the dealer or manufacturer had thoroughly familiarized 
himself with the laws before starting in business or placing a new 
product upon the market, to say nothing of the inconvenience and loss 
of time. 

As in past years, new and necessary equipment has been added in 
the chemical laboratories in order that they may be kept up-to-date and 
fitted for all analytical operations that may be necessary in the examina- 
tion of foods and drugs. 

Similarity of the federal and Indiana pure food and drug laws has 
greatly facilitated co-operative work between this department and the 
Federal Bureau of Chemistry. Evidence has been referred to the fed- 
eral bureau in a number of interstate cases which could not be adjusted 
by the state department. Many federal samples have been collected 
and submitted to the federal department either at Cincinnati or Chicago. 
Through such co-operative work much misbranded and adulterated mer- 
chandise has been removed from the Indiana markets. While misbrand- 
ing and adulteration are impositions upon the consumer, cleanliness and 
wholesomeness of foods are of much greater importance, and it has been 
to this phase of food control work that the members of the department 
have largely devoted their attention. 

The sanitary food law, one of the most effective in the United 
States, directs that the inspector shall furnish evidence of violation to 



State Board of Health 267 

the prosecuting attorney or shall report such violations to the State 
Food and Drug Commissioner, who in turn shall issue an order to the 
offender to abate the conditions complained of. The latter method has 
been most often followed with gratifying results. With few exceptions 
conferences with the person or firm affected will bring about a correc- 
tion of any unsanitary condition or practice. 

Co-operation with other state departments and institutions has been 
continued throughout the year in all cases in which it seemed to be to 
the best interests of the state. 

Aid has also been rendered the various prohibition agents through 
the examination in the laboratories of suspected liquors. 

adulteration and misbranding of foods and drugs 

Adulterated or misbranded foods and drugs have been reduced to 
the minimum, and when found are usually of state origin. Evidence 
of adulteration or misbranding in foods or drugs which have entered 
the state through interstate commerce is usually referred to the United 
States Bureau of Chemistry, together with properly collected samples. 
Adulteration of foods is confined largely to that class of perishable 
goods produced and distributed within the state, such as meats and 
dairy products. 

Of the samples of food examined in the laboratory during the year, 
71.4%, exclusive of liquor samples, were classed as legal. Of the 28.6% 
classified as illegal, the majority of the samples were either dairy or 
meat products. Near 29% of the 647 samples of butter, condensed milk, 
cream, ice cream and milk were found adulterated. The highest per- 
centage of adulteration, namely 58%, was found in butter. Adultera- 
tion consisted either in low butterfat or high moisture, or both. It is 
not fair to assume that these figures are representatives of average con- 
ditions, since in most cases only suspected samples were taken, but they 
do indicate that the percentage of adulteration in these products is 
entirely too high. 

Some butchers still persist in adding cereal and sulphites to sausage 
and hamburger. These are gross adulterations, since both materials 
make the product appear better than it really is. No doubt many 
housewives have marveled at the great shrinkage in sausage when pre- 
pared for the table. Such shrinkage ceases to be a marvel when it is 
learned that the addition of three per cent cereal will enable the butcher 
to incorporate twenty-five per cent of water. 

Ninety-five miscellaneous drug samples were analyzed, of which 
13.7% were classed as illegal. These samples were of a very miscel- 
laneous character and the results of the analyses do not correctly rep- 
resent conditions in the open market. The work of the United States 
Bureau of Chemistry, together with that of the state departments, has 
greatly improved the quality of standard pharmaceuticals and has done 
much to bring about the proper labeling of patent medicines. 

BEVERAGES 

Beverage manufacture has offered a fruitful field for adulteration 
and misbranding in the past. Inspection and examination of beverages 



268 Year Book 

has shown very greatly improved conditions and the adulterated bever- 
age is now the exception. The sanitation of bottling plants and soft 
drink dispensaries offers the most difficult problem. Further legislation 
is needed for the correction of conditions existing in many of these 
plants, and it is hoped that the Indiana General Assembly will enact a 
law similar to those of Michigan and Ohio, which have resulted in such 
marked improvement of sanitary conditions and quality of products in 
these states. Many Indiana bottlers have expressed themselves very 
favorably on such legislation. 

EGGS 

The buying and selling of eggs has caused the members of the 
department much difficulty. While the State Board of Health has 
adopted a rule requiring the candling of eggs between April fifteenth 
and December first of each year, many buyers have failed to comply. 
Consequently many unfit eggs have gone into our market, which has 
caused other states to look upon Indiana eggs with suspicion. Many 
dealers have also disregarded the regulations governing the sale of 
storage eggs, failing to place upon them the required cold storage card, 
thus often permitting the customer to buy them under the impression 
that they are fresh eggs. An egg law similar to that of Illinois and 
several other states is badly needed. It is believed that at least ninety 
per cent of the large egg buyers in the state condemn the present prac- 
tices, but cannot meet the competition of those who refuse to buy only 
perfect eggs from the producer. 



State Board of Health 269 

analysis of foods made during the year of october, 1921-september, 1922 



Classification 


Number 
Legal 


Number 
Illegal 


Total 


Bakery Products 


7 
1 


2 


9 




1 




1 
6 

113 
4 
8 
1 
4 
5 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

16 

12 

1 


1 






6 


Beverages 


15 


128 




4 


Cider 


3 


11 








5 

1 












Pop 


9 


11 












White Mule 


1 






17 




13 








1 

7 

5 
1 






















Corn Flakes 






Flour 














1 












1 

40 

1 

6 

21 

53 

1 

339 






1 96^ 




56 
1 




2 




6 




7 
19 


28 




72 




1 


Milk 


103 

2 
1 


442 




2 






1 




1 

1 
4 
1 
3 

1 

3 
1 
1 


1 






1 






4 






1 






3 












3 






1 


Jelly 




1 




1 

1 
1 
1 


1 




2 


3 




1 










1 


j 






1 




1 

1 


1 




5 


6 



270 Year Book 

analysis of foods made during the year of october, 1921-september, 1922 



Classification 


Number 
Legal 


Number 
Illegal 


Total 


Malted Milk 


1 




1 


Meat and Meat Products 


1 

11 
1 
3 


1 




9 
11 
1 
1 
6 

1 

31 

3 


20 




12 




4 




1 






6 






1 






31 




2 

1 


5 




1 




1 
1 
6 
5 

5 

2 

1 

3 








1 






6 






5 


Syrup 


1 
3 
1 


6 




5 




2 


Olive Oil . . 


3 


Vegetables and Vegetable Products 


1 
2 
1 
2 


1 




1 
1 


3 




2 




2 




1 
1 
1 
1 
5 


1 






1 






1 




1 
5 


2 




10 




1 




1 

6 
8 


1 




5 

4 

1 

1 


11 


Cider 


12 






Miscellaneous 




1 




3 


3 




1 


1 


Salt 


1 

1 
2 


1 


Tea 




1 






2 








Total 


671 


425 


1,096 




1,018 








Grand Total 






2,114 









State Board of Health 271 

ANALYSIS OF DRUGS MADE DURING THE YEAR OF OCTOBER, 1921-SEPTEMBER, 1922 



Classification 


Number 
Legal 


Number 
Illegal 


Total 


"A" Condimentine 


2 




2 


Arom. Cascara 


1 


1 
2 


Aspirin : 


2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
2 
2 

2 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
6 
1 
3 
2 


Beauty Bleach 




1 


Beef, Iron and Wine 




1 


Bleaching Cream 






Brown Liquid 




1 


Castor Oil 




1 


Chemical— Unknown 




2 


Chicken Feed 




2 


Cream Tartar 




1 


Drug Solution 




2 


Drug— Unknown 




1 






1 






1 


Fruit Tree Spray 




1 


Hair Tonic 




1 


Hypodermatic Tablets 




1 






1 






6 






1 






3 




1 

1 


3 


Lydifl- E. Pinkham's Vpgp.tqhlp. Cnmpniind 


1 


Neat's Foot Oil 


1 

2 

1 

1 
3 
1 
1 

1 
1 


1 






1 




2 


4 




1 






1 






1 






3 






1 






1 






1 




1 
1 


2 




1 




1 


1 






1 


Rx 1000 


1 


1 






1 


Salts (Crab Orchard) 


1 
1 
1 
1 
. 5 
2 
1 


1 






1 






1 






1 






5 






2 






1 




! 


1 






1 




2 
3 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


1 






2 






3 






2 






1 






1 




1 


2 




1 






1 






1 


Urine 




1 



272 Year Book 

ANALYSIS OF DRUGS MADE DURING THE YEAR OF OCTOBER, 1921-SEPTEMBER, 1922 



Classification 


Number 
Legal 


Number 
Illegal 


Total 




1 




1 




1 


1 


Wall Paper 


1 


1 








Total 


80 
2 


13 


03 




2 










82 


13 


95 







TRAVELING MILK LABORATORY 

During the summer of 1921 the Indiana State Board of Health 
adopted a resolution establishing the traveling milk laboratory as a part 
of the Department of Food and Drugs. The board stated in its resolu- 
tion that "The object and work of the traveling milk laboratory is: With 
the co-operation of local authorities, to secure a pure milk supply for 
the people." Considerable difficulty and delay was experienced in find- 
ing a competent bacteriologist to take charge of the laboratory. Finally 
Frank C. Wilson, a post-graduate bacteriologist of the Agricultural 
School of the University of Wisconsin, was secured and began the 
work on November 1, 1921. 

Surveys in seven cities were completed during the remainder of 
the fiscal year of 1921 and 1922. A summary of the work of the labora- 
tory during this period will show without doubt that much has been 
done toward the accomplishment of the object of the laboratory as set 
out by the State Board of Health in its resolution. 

PLAN OP OPERATION 

Surveys of milk supplies have only been undertaken at the request 
of local city boards of health, chambers of commerce or interested health 
and civic associations. The surveys have been made without cost to the 
cities other than the furnishing of a room for the laboratory equipped 
with light, heat, water, gas and electric current. Transportation was 
also requested in the earlier surveys, but as the transportation furnished 
was usually unsatisfactory in that it could not be depended upon at 
the time needed, the bacteriologist has been supplied with a Ford coupe. 
This automobile has proven most useful, since the necessary time for 
a survey will be reduced almost half. After the laboratory is estab- 
lished in a city, samples of milk, as they are delivered to the consumer, 
are immediately collected and bacteriological examinations made. This 
preliminary work is followed by sanitary inspections of all milk plants 
and of all dairies delivering directly to the consumer. In these inspec- 
tions an attempt is made to point out to the dairyman or operator of 
the milk plant causes of any trouble that may have been indicated by 
the preliminary examination of the milk coming from that individual 
plant, and instructions given for their correction or removal. By this 
plan of work it has not been uncommon to secure the elimination of 
undesirable types of bacteria and the reduction of counts of several 



State Board op Health 273 

millions to a hundred thousand or less of bacteria per cubic centimeter. 
Sometimes several follow-up inspections are necessary before the trouble 
is overcome. 

The great value of the work is the educational feature as it relates 
both to the producer and to the consumer. Harsh methods are not re- 
sorted to, but rather co-operation is invited from every source that may 
lend assistance. As already stated, seven surveys were completed dur- 
ing the year which involved several hundred sanitary inspections and 
the bacteriological examination of 1,018 samples of milk. Space for- 
bids the report in detail of these surveys, which were completed in the 
cities of Huntington, Bedford, Shelbyville, Marion, Connersville, Ander- 
son and Muncie. 

tangible results 

As a direct result of the surveys already made, Bedford, Shelbyville 
and Anderson have adopted ordinances fixing the standards for milk 
and milk products and providing for sanitary inspection of dairies and 
milk plants. Connersville and Muncie have ordinances under considera- 
tion. Several other towns in close proximity to these cities served have 
become interested and have passed ordinances. 

SPECIAL WORK 

In addition to his regular duties the bacteriologist has given many 
talks before various associations and schools, has taken part in many 
conferences and has carried on several special investigations. Talks 
and addresses on milk and allied topics have been given as follows: 

Parent-teachers associations 2 

Employes of industrial plants 1 

Chambers of commerce 2 

Civic clubs 17 

Schools and high school classes 11 

City councils 1 

Dairy and milk dealers associations 3 

Board of Works 1 

Conferences have been held with: 

City boards of health 1 

City mayors 4 

City councils 5 

Chambers of commerce 7 

City attorneys , 2 

City health commissioners 3 

Directors of sanitariums 1 

Officials of tuberculosis associations .• 2 

Individual dairymen 46 

Two investigations of typhoid fever epidemics have been made. 

These talks and conferences, together with newspaper notices, have 
widely distributed the results and information obtained in these surveys 
and has done much to better the milk supplies in the cities served and 
the surrounding communities. 

The work has been well received by dairymen and consumer alike, 
and both realize that it is not only the purpose of the laboratory to 

18—22978 



274 



Year Book 



secure safe milk but a very greatly increased consumption of this 
indispensable food. 

The surveys have demonstrated first, that but few Indiana cities 
have milk supplies that can be considered wholly safe; second, that 
health officers and citizens are not taking proper precautions against the 
spread of contagious diseases by means of milk and the improper han- 
dling of milk bottles; third, that our citizens do not realize that milk 
is the best and only indispensable food for children; fourth, that dairy- 
men and milk plant operators are willing to produce and distribute safe 
milk when fully informed upon the subject of safe milk; fifth, that 
expensive dairy equipment is unnecessary to the production of clean, 
pure milk; sixth, that lack of attention to small details causes most of 
the dirty milk and milk with high bacterial counts; seventh, that a 
pure water supply is a necessity; eighth, that means for sterilization 
of all utensils and apparatus and the drying of milk cans is absolutely 
necessary for milk of low bacterial content; ninth, that automatic 
recording thermometers are indispensable for insuring proper pasteuriza- 
tion; tenth, that individuals, civic and health organizations will sup- 
port pure milk campaigns when they realize the indispensability of milk, 
and at the same time understand the grave danger from the use of milk 
that has not been made entirely safe. 

The following table will indicate the nature of the supplies in those 
cities which have been surveyed and the per capita consumption at the 
time when the surveys were begun. 



City 


Percentage 

Milk 
Pasteurized 


Percentage 
Raw Milk from 

Tuberculin 
Tested Herds 


Percentage 

Raw Milk 

From Untested 

Herds 


Per Capita 

Consumption 

Milk in Pints 

Per Day 




80.00 
52.00 


20.00 
30.00 
100.00 raw 
12.00 




0.57 


Bedford 


18.00 


0.38 


Shelbyville 


0.48 




30.00 
70.00 
62.00 
69.00 
93.80 


58.00 
30.00 
32.00 
25.00 


0.60 




0.62 




6.00 
6.00 
6.20 


0.57 




0.70 




0.61 









SANITARY INSPECTIONS 



Five food and drug inspectors have been employed in the work of 
sanitary inspection of food manufacturing and distributing establish- 
ments. These inspectors while endowed with police power have been 
considered rather sanitary engineers than policemen and have advised 
and counselled with manufacturers and distributors of foods and drugs 
in an endeavor to improve the sanitation of all food plants, and the 
more uniform observance of recognized sanitary practice. To most 
manufacturers and dealers the inspector is a friend and is so received 
upon his visits to them. He brings to them suggestions of betterment 
in their plants, and information relative to the latest sanitary equip- 
ment and practice. To the unscrupulous, however, his visit has always 
been a source of fear. This class of dealers is undoubtedly growing 
smaller from year to year. The use of automobiles, some the personal 



State Board op Health 275 

property of the inspectors, and others the property of the department, 
has made it possible to cover the state more thoroughly than in past 
years. During the fiscal year which closed on September 30, 1922, the 
inspectors visited 1,098 cities, towns and villages. This number in- 
cludes practically every city and town in the state of five hundred 
inhabitants or more. Many of these places were visited several times 
during the year. It is unfortunate that available funds will not per- 
mit an increase in the inspection staff and the supplying of each in- 
spector with an automobile. It has been found that an inspector can 
easily triple his inspections through the use of an automobile. 

A total of 19,381 first inspections were made and 1,188 follow-up 
inspections, or a grand total of 20,569, embracing thirty classes of food 
manufacturing and distributing establishments. The number of in- 
spections is greater by about twenty per cent than the number of 
inspections made in either of the two previous years. Of the 19,381 
places inspected 10,334, or 53%, were classified as good; 7,579, or 39%, 
fair; 1,287, or 6.5%, poor; 163, or .8%, bad, and only 18, or .2 of one 
per cent as excellent. 

From the standpoint of sanitation the inspection of dairy products, 
establishments, restaurants, hotels and bakeries is perhaps of the most 
importance. These establishments all produce or handle goods which 
are easily contaminated and which are very extensively used in every 
home. They have likewise offered the greatest difficulties. Cream sta- 
tions for receiving cream number practically two thousand and dairies 
are almost countless and so widely distributed that it is practically im- 
possible for the small inspection force of five inspectors to reach them. 
Ownership of restaurants, especially of the smaller ones, is changing 
continuously and new restaurants are established. Oftentimes the 
operator knows but little of the restaurant business and has but very 
crude conceptions of the sanitary handling of food and the utensils 
necessary to its preparation and serving. Many of the smaller bakeries 
also change hands often and new ones are constantly springing up. 
In many cases a change of ownership prevents the carrying out of 
instructions given by the inspector and the work must all be repeated 
with the new proprietor. 

It is a pleasure to report that many associations, especially those 
of retail grocers, bakers, dairy products and beverage manufacturers, 
have done very much to improve the sanitary conditions of plants and 
to eliminate objectionable trade practices in their various industries. 

All the county fairs held during the year were visited by the in- 
spectors and inspections made of the stands handling foods and drinks, 
and of garbage disposal and the' general sanitation of the grounds. 
The majority of the stand owners and the fair association officials have 
co-operated in this work, and it is safe" to say that conditions that 
might affect the health of those attending these fairs are gradually 
improving. At least four inspectors attended the full session of the 
State Fair and with the fair officials maintained a very high standard 
of sanitation in the stands and throughout the grounds. 

In addition to the list of inspections already indicated, many spe- 
cial investigations and inspections have been carried on. 



276 Year Book 



bakeries 



Seven hundred and fifty-nine bakeries were inspected during the 
year. The majority were rated equally between fair and good. Only 
eighteen were considered bad by the inspectors. The general improve- 
ment of bakeries has been very marked since the Indiana bakery law 
became effective, July 1, 1919. Some of the largest and best bakeries 
in the country have been established in the state. The trend in the 
baking industry is toward automatic machinery, which is reducing hand 
handling of bakery products to a minimum. Already in some of these 
plants the loaf is scarcely touched by human hands from the time the 
mixing is begun until the loaf is baked and wrapped ready for the 
consumer. Comparatively few violations of the provisions of the 
bakery law have been discovered. For the most part bakers seem well 
pleased with the law and are anxious to see it effectively enforced. 

CANNING FACTORIES 

One hundred and three canning factories were inspected. Here, as 
in the case of the bakeries, marked improvement is noticeable. Some 
very splendid plants have been constructed during the past year. If 
the canners continue to improve their plants and working methods as 
they have in the past few years, Indiana will soon stand in the front 
rank. 

BOTTLING WORKS 

Sixty-nine bottling works were inspected, of which one was graded 
excellent, 38 good, 21 fair, 7 poor and only 2 bad. A number of modern 
plants have been constructed within the past two or three years, well 
supplied with light, ventilation and drainage, elements absolutely neces- 
sary in this industry. Automatic machinery is rapidly taking the place 
of hand methods of the past. The practice of washing bottles by hand 
in tubs and without chemicals is not only unsatisfactory but dangerous. 
Fortunately but few plants in the state continue to use this method. 
All plants of any size and whose operator has in mind the health of 
the consumer have installed automatic washing and soaking machines 
in which the bottles are chemically treated in such manner that all 
harmful bacteria are destroyed. 

GROCERY STORES AND MEAT MARKETS 

These establishments outnumber those of any other line of the food 
handling industries and have reached a very gratifying degree of ex- 
cellency in sanitation. Three thousand two hundred and sixty of the 
5,337 groceries inspected were rated good, as against 1,799 rated fair, 
243 poor and only 30 bad. Of the 1,977 meat markets 1,142 were rated 
good, 710 fair, 107 poor and only 18 bad. Almost every Indiana city 
can boast of one or more groceries and meat markets that meet almost 
every requirement of the sanitary laws, and in which it is a delight 
to the housewife to do her buying. 



State Board of Health 277 



HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS 



Hotel and restaurant kitchens and dining-rooms have received the 
special attention of the inspectors during the year. It is highly neces- 
sary to the health of the patrons of these establishments that they 
meet every requirement for sanitation. Inspectors have insisted upon 
proprietors giving careful attention to the cleansing of dishes and 
glasses, cooking utensils and to the disposal of garbage. Also to see 
to it that ice boxes are kept entirely wholesome and that no spoiled 
foods of any character are kept in ice boxes or served to the public. 
Two thousand six hundred and forty-three places were inspected, of 
which 2 were rated excellent, 1,069 good, 1,348 fair, 202 poor and 22 
bad. From these ratings it is evident that too many hotels and res- 
taurants are still in classes below good, despite the improvement that 
has been brought about during the past five years. 

ESTABLISHMENTS MANUFACTURING OR DISTRIBUTING DAIRY PRODUCTS 

This industry is so broad that only a greatly increased inspection 
staff could accomplish the work so seriously needed. The sanitation of 
dairies offers the greatest difficulty. The bulk of the milk sold in In- 
diana is produced in dairies of only a few cows each. Dairying in this 
state is rather a side-line than a distinct business. Improvement of 
conditions must necessarily be brought about through the educational 
efforts of the various state departments and civic and industrial asso- 
ciations who may be interested in this great problem. 

The creameries for the most part range from fair to good, the 
former class being entirely too large. 

Sanitation of the approximately two thousand cream stations has 
been improved largely through the efforts of creamery operators in co- 
operation with the Department of Foods and Drugs. 

Ice cream factories rank practically as the creameries, and in fact 
in a large number of cases creameries, milk plants and ice cream fac- 
tories are under the same management. 

Many modem creameries, ice cream factories and milk plants have 
recently been built. Many milk plants are installing pasteurizing ap- 
paratus, the operators realizing that through this method only can they 
hope to deliver a safe milk. 

The tables which follow will indicate sanitary conditions in those 
plants which have not been specifically mentioned. 

The table of follow-up inspections shows that the number of such 
inspections made this year was double that of last year. 



278 



Year Book 



SUMMARY OF SANITARY INSPECTIONS MADE DURING THE YEAR OF OCTOBER, 1921— 

SEPTEMBER, 1922 



Classifications 


Number 
Inspected 


Number 
Excellent 


Number 
Good 


Number 
Fair 


Number 
Poor 


Number 
Bad 




759 

78 

69 

103 

1,780 

1 

103 

932 

513 

993 

1 

39 

165 

243 

174 

15 

5,337 

2,643 

28 

143 

790 

1,977 

97 

1 

395 

45 

1,907 

48 

1 

1 


2 


326 
11 

38 

53 

1,135 

1 

56 
295 

82 
620 


333 
47 
21 
38 

593 


80 
20 
7 
11 
44 


18 






Bottling Works 


1 


2 




1 




3 


5 










41 

436 

233 

313 

1 

15 

119 

80 

49 

2 

1,799 

1,348 

5 

48 

260 

710 

33 


5 
183 
162 
56 


j 






18 




1 

3 


35 




1 










24 

41 

154 

113 

12 

3,260 

1,069 

20 

86 

508 

1,142 

54 

1 

161 

20 

1,042 

9 










5 

9 

11 

1 

243 

202 

2 

6 

22 

107 

5 










Flour Mills.. . 


1 










5 

2 


30 




22 




1 






3 












18 


Milk Plants 




5 












201 
20 

800 
34 


33 
5 

62 
5 

1 














3 


Soft Drink Stands 
















1 
















Total 


19,381 


18 


10,334 


7,579 


1,287 


163 







SUMMARY OF FOLLOW-UP INSPECTIONS MADE DURING THE YEAR OF OCTOBER, 1921 

—SEPTEMBER, 1922 



Classifications 


Number 
Inspections 


Number 
O. K. 


Number Not 
Satisfactory 




81 

49 

3 

55 

29 

1 

1 

426 

33 

1 

209 

14 

87 

18 

4 

2 

1 

174 


68 

49 

3 

46 

16 

1 

1 

422 

26 

1 

189 

14 

87 

16 

3 

2 

1 

174 


13 












9 




13 






Flour Mills 






4 




7 








20 












2 


Milk Plants 


1 


















Total 


1,188 


1,119 


69 







CONDEMNATION NOTICES 



When upon inspection of food establishments unsanitary conditions 
are found which the inspector feels deserves more attention than would 
be implied by verbal instructions, a report is made to the department 
which is used as a basis for the issuance of a so-called condemnation 



State Board of Health 



279 



notice or order for improvements. A written notice is sent directly 
to the proprietor calling his attention to the unsanitary conditions 
existing, and fixing a date prior to which they must be abated. The 
sanitary law gives the receiver of the notice five days in which to appear 
personally before the food and drug commission to show why the im- 
provements ordered should not be made. At the expiration of the time 
given for the completion of the improvements, a reinspection is made 
and the case closed if the unsanitary conditions have been abated or 
improvements made, otherwise the case is presented to the prosecuting 
attorney for legal action.. It is seldom necessary to resort to the courts 
in this instance. The causes for the issuance of condemnation notices 
are unsanitary conditions, improper construction, no health certificates 
and, in the case of bakers, failure to properly label the bread or for 
failure to observe the standard weight bread regulation. Improper 
construction may include lack of facilities for proper lighting, ventila- 
tion and drainage or arrangement that will not permit of proper sani- 
tary practices. It usually constitutes some change in the construction 
of the building or in some of the furnishings. 

Five hundred and ninety-five condemnation notices were issued dur- 
ing the year for 1,057 causes which were about equally divided between 
unsanitary conditions and improper construction. Compliance was ob- 
tained in 449 cases without resorting to prosecution. The majority of 
the remaining cases will be adjusted during the succeeding fiscal year. 

SUMMARY OF CONDEMNATION NOTICES ISSUED DURING YEAR OF OCTOBER, 1921— 

SEPTEMBER, 1922 



Classification 


Number 
Issued 


Reasons for Condemnation 


Orders Com- 
plied With 
and Cases 
Closed 


Unsanitary 
Conditions 


Improper 
Construction 


No Health 
Certificates 


No Bread 
Labels 




63 
2 
1 
3 

1 
12 


57 
1 
1 
3 
1 

12 


41 
2 
1 
3 
1 

12 


9 


11 


50 


Bottling Works 


8 
































12 








2 




157 
110 


117 
107 


151 

109 






138 








35 








9 




09 
PI 

F3 
r 33 
[25 

2 


9 
1 

2 
33 

24 
4 
2 


3 
1 
3 
23 
16 
5 
2 






6 










Flour Mills . 












1 


30 






3 








4 
















2 




1 

37 ' 
61 
1 f ' 

not 

10 f 

2 
1 f 


1- 

33 

1 

1 

101 

10 

2 












26 
6 

1 
91 

7 
2 

1 


1 




28 


Milk Plants 




4 












5 




84 






34 




























Total 


595 


523 


507 


15 


12 


449 







280 Year Book 



PROSECUTIONS 



Sixty-three cases were filed for prosecution during the year. Fifty- 
eight convictions were obtained; one defendant prosecuted for the sale 
of putrid meat was discharged; another prosecuted for the sale of milk 
below standard was found not guilty. In two other cases, one of un- 
sanitary conditions and the other the sale of spoiled meat, judgment was 
withheld by the court. 

The following table sets forth the complaint and the result of the 
prosecution in each case. 



State Board of Health 



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State Board op Health 283 

prosecutions, october, 1921— september, 1922 



1 Adulterated butter. 

1 Adulterated cream. 

6 Bread not labeled. 

1 Buying chickens short weight over fraudulent scales. 

1 Cereal in hamburger. 

2 Exposing candy. 

2 Failing to candle eggs. 

1 Failing to label bread properly. 

1 Having butchered for sale, for food, a diseased cow. 

1 Operating unsanitary grocery. 

1 Operating unsanitary market. 

1 Selling a hog unfit for human consumption. 

1 Selling incubator eggs. 

2 Selling food under unsanitary conditions. 
1 Selling milk below standard. 

1 Selling coal by the basket and not weighing. 

1 Short weight bread (misbranding). 
13 Spoiled meat in ice box for sale for human consumption. 

8 Using sulphites in meats. 
17 Visible dirt in milk. 

63 Total. 



REPORT OF THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF WEIGHTS AND 

MEASURES 

The Department of Weights and Measures is charged with the en- 
forcement of the following laws: first, the general weights and meas- 
ures act of 1911, which provides for standard weights and measures 
and their custody; specifies the manner of selecting and appointing city 
inspectors; defines violations and fixes penalties; requires the testing 
once each year of all weighing and measuring devices of all state insti- 
tutions under the jurisdiction of the Board of State Charities; requires 
the checking of standards of local inspectors biennially and directs that 
tests of weighing and measuring devices be made upon request from 
any private citizen; second, the sale by weight law of 1917, which re- 
quires that practically all fruits, vegetables and seeds be sold by weight, 
except those commonly sold by numerical count and except berries and 
small fruits; third, the bushel weight law of 1917, which defines the 
weight of a bushel of the common vegetables, fruits and seeds; fourth, 
the law of 1921, which is supplementary to Section 8 of the general act 
and makes it an offense for any buyer of live stock, grain, feed, junk 
or other commodity to use false measuring devices or in any way to 
make false representation regarding weight. 

Two state inspectors and twenty-three local inspectors, exclusive of 
deputies, have been engaged in enforcing the provisions of the various 
laws. 

EXTENSION OF LOCAL INSPECTION 

The compilation of inspections of the local departments for the 
fiscal year, and which has been made a part of this report, is the 
strongest argument for the extension of weights and measures inspec- 
tion to every county in the state. This compilation shows that a large 
portion of the weights and measures devices of the state are inaccurate 
and that large sums of money are lost to buyers and sellers every year. 
It is said that the United States Government employs six thousand 
persons in order to insure accuracy in the money that is coined in the 



284 Year Book 

United States every year. Few people stop to think that every opera- 
tion of weighing or measuring in daily trade consists in reality in the 
weighing or measuring of money, since every commodity so weighed or 
measured has a corresponding money value. Despite this fact, but few 
people take any precaution to make sure that the weighing or measuring 
is performed accurately on accurate weighing or measuring devices. If 
the government can afford to pay six thousand salaries to insure ac- 
curacy in our coinage, it would seem good economic policy to employ 
a comparatively few persons to insure accuracy in weighing and meas- 
uring operations in which millions of dollars of value are concerned. 
Under the present state organization not more than one-fourth the 
citizens are served by daily systematic inspection. The remaining three- 
fourths of our citizens must depend upon the comparatively slight 
service that can be rendered by two state inspectors. It is unnecessary 
to state that two inspectors cannot adequately perform this immense 
amount of work, and that the only solution is the extension of the state 
department together with whatever extension of local service it is pos- 
sible to secure. 

ROUTINE INSPECTION 

All scales and measuring devices of each of the institutions under 
the jurisdiction of the Board of State Charities have been tested during 
the year, as required by law. For the most part these devices were 
found accurate within the tolerances permitted. In few cases recom- 
mendations for repairs or for the purchase of new instruments were 
made. 

The standards of local city and county sealers have been checked 
in accordance with the provisions of the law requiring biennial testing. 

The department's food, drug and weights and measures exhibit has 
been shown at several local fairs and pageants of progress during the 
year. It has created much interest and much favorable comment from 
those who have seen it. Inspectors of the department have conducted 
many special investigations, both independent and in conjunction with 
local departments. These investigations have resulted in a number of 
adjustments which otherwise would have been settled at very great 
expense in the courts. It has been the policy of the department to co- 
operate with all individuals and associations when it seemed to the 
best interests of the state. Farmers' organizations, county agents and 
others have rendered the department very valuable service. The num- 
ber of requests from private citizens for tests of weighing and measur- 
ing devices has continued to increase and at times has taxed the facili- 
ties for such work. The larger number of these requests are for tests 
of heavy wagon and truck scales. 

SCALES 

The inspectors of the department have tested 1,916 scales of all 
descriptions, of which only 64.5% were found correct. The remaining 
35.5% were either adjusted, condemned for repairs or confiscated. The 
inaccurate scales have not been found always weighing against the con- 
sumer, but in many cases were causing loss to the dealer. The results 



State Board of Health 285 

of the inspection work of the various weights and measures departments 
has caused the installation of a large number of new wagon and truck 
scales of modern type throughout the state. Never in the history of 
the department has there been such wide interest manifested in accurate 
weighing devices. 

A total of 40,144 scales of all varieties were tested in the state 
during the fiscal year. Of this number only 68.7% were passed as ac- 
curate. The percentage of accurate scales is very much higher than 
this figure in many of the cities and counties that have had systematic 
inspection for a number of years. In other cities and counties where 
inspection has only been carried on for a short time the percentage is 
considerably lower. These statistics do not necessarily show that there 
is a large number of unscrupulous dealers in the state, but they do 
show very conclusively that scales are delicate pieces of mechanism 
which must have constant care and oversight if they are to be kept in 
a condition fit for use. 

weights 

Of the 22,710 weights which were tested 96.4% were found accurate. 
This high percentage of accuracy of course is explained by the fact that 
weights are only pieces of metal and have no delicate construction to 
wear or get out of order. 

DRY MEASURES 

Ninety-six and eight-tenths per cent of the 7,132 dry measures 
tested were accurate. The dry measures reported consisted largely of 
berry boxes, which have become largely standardized. Early in the 
season a survey of the basket manufacturers in this section of the 
country was made both by the state inspectors and by the United States 
Bureau of Standards. Only two or three manufacturers were found 
to be manufacturing boxes or baskets of short measure. These manu- 
facturers took immediate steps to make corrections and it is believed 
that no appreciable number of short measure boxes or baskets reached 
the Indiana market during the past season. . 

LIQUID MEASURES 

Seven thousand one hundred and thirty-two liquid measures were 
tested, of which 95.2% were found correct within the permitted toler- 
ances. This high percentage of satisfactory liquid measures is due to 
the fact that manufacturers are universally complying with the federal 
and state regulations. Manufacturers are aware that all inaccurate 
liquid measures will be confiscated, hence they do not care to take the 
chance of the financial loss thus incurred. Aside from being accurate 
in volume, liquid measures should be constructed of a good quality of 
tin or copper. The larger number of the 341 measures condemned were 
condemned because the metal was of light weight and had become badly 
dented from use. The consumer can guard against short measure by 
making certain that all measures have smooth, straight sides entirely 
free from dents. 



286 Year Book 



LINEAR MEASURES 



Ninety-four and five-tenths per cent of the 1,942 linear measures 
examined were passed. The most common linear measure is the com- 
mon yard stick. All such sticks which are not provided with metal 
ferrules to protect the ends from wear are condemned. All customers 
should refuse to buy goods measured by tacks driven in the counter. 
This method of measurement offers many opportunities for fraud. 

GASOLINE PUMPS 

No class of measuring devices is of greater interest or importance 
today than the gasoline pump. In 1921 the consumption of gasoline 
in Indiana was practically one hundred and fifty million gallons at an 
approximate cost to consumers of thirty-four million dollars. When it 
is considered that the bulk of this gasoline is sold through the gasoline 
pump, the supreme importance of accuracy in these pumps is at once 
realized. A gasoline pump from the very nature of its construction will 
more often measure against the consumer if incorrect rather than in 
his favor. Shortages are usually caused by leakage of foot valves or 
at some joint in the pipes. The state department inspected 184 gaso- 
line pumps during the year in widely separated localities and found 
48.4% of them inaccurate. Local inspectors tested 4,094 pumps, of 
which 27.4% were found inaccurate. In some of these counties and 
cities where local inspection has been established for a number of 
years, the proportion of inaccurate pumps was found to be less than 
ten per cent. In one county where local inspection was only recently 
established 68% of the pumps were found to be incorrect. In communi- 
ties in which systematic inspection has been established and maintained 
the average percentage of incorrect pumps, as indicated by the sta- 
tistics, is 21% less than in communities where only occasional inspec- 
tion is made by the state inspectors. This fact is a very strong argu- 
ment for state-wide systematic inspection. The large oil companies have 
instructed operators of gasoline pumps to test them each morning be- 
fore the day's business begins. It is doubtful, however, if all the oper- 
ators comply with these instructions, judging from the results of in- 
spection. A very large number of pumps are operated independently 
by persons who are not mechanics and who are not familiar with the 
construction of gasoline pumps, hence are not in a position to insure 
their accuracy. Only constant and careful supervision of gasoline 
pumps, especially the blind type, can insure the purchaser against loss. 

TOTAL INSPECTIONS 

The total inspections made, exclusive of special investigations, by 
all inspectors in Indiana was 111,491. No one can estimate the saving 
in money to the citizens of Indiana through this splendid work. The 
value of these departments does not depend so much upon the tricks 
and shortages and inaccuracies discovered, as upon those savings 
brought about through the prevention of the use of inaccurate weigh- 
ing and measuring devices and through the fear of the unscrupulous 
dealer of being caught in his nefarious practices. 

The following tables show in detail the work of the state depart- 
ment as well as that of all local city and county departments: 



State Board of Health 



287 



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State Board of Health 289 

REPORT OF THE WATER AND SEWAGE DEPARTMENT 

I. L. MILLER, Chief of Division of Chemistry. 
L. A. GEUPEL, Director, Water and Sewage Department. 
*H. W. DEUKER, Senior Chemist and Bacteriologist. 
B. H. JEUP, Senior Chemist and Bacteriologist. 
LELAH BARNES, Assistant Water Chemist and Bacteriologist. 
MARION S. CAMPBELL, Laboratory Assistant. 

As many field surveys and inspections of the public water supplies 
were made throughout the year as were possible with the limited per- 
sonnel available. In most instances the courtesy and co-operation of 
the water works officials, local city and town officials and health authori- 
ties greatly assisted the work of the Water and Sewage Department. 

In general the public water supplies are being developed in a very 
efficient manner and the water delivered to the consumer is of good 
quality and meets the requirements of the standards set down by the 
best engineering and laboratory practice. Any requests or recommenda- 
tions included in reports of surveys or inspections are always made 
with the thought of assisting the public at large in maintaining the 
best health conditions possible. 

The summer months of 1922 have shown the water departments 
and companies that a sufficient amount of water must be conserved that 
an adequate supply for extreme emergency may be available. Such 
cities as Bloomington, Elkhart, Bicknell, Columbia City, Frankfort, 
Franklin, Laporte, Mishawaka, Plymouth and Tipton have been forced 
to increase their sources of water supply. The possible danger hazards 
to which cities are subjected, due to a depletion of their water supplies, 
are causing the public as well as public officials and water works execu- 
tives to realize that an adequate satisfactory water supply for all needs 
is a most important factor in the development of good health and com- 
fort as well as the economical growth of a city. In the State of In- 
diana there are still too many cities and towns on the "questionable 
list" and until their city officials realize the necessity of a wholesome, 
adequate water supply the growth as well as the good health of the 
city is at stake. The city of Bloomington, which had an impounded 
supply, is at present without sufficient water for its needs and should 
serve as a warning to all cities to guard most jealously the quantity 
and quality of their water supplies. 

Field inspections and surveys made in conjunction with laboratory 
analyses have indicated the water supplies of the following cities and 
towns to be periodically of questionable quality: Huntingburg, Owens- 
ville, Oakland City, Lanesville, Leavenworth, Royal Center, Salem, West 
Lebanon, Rochester and Jasonville. There are a few cities and towns 
which supply water to their consumers that cannot be termed potable 
at any time and, so far as the department is informed, have made no 
pretense of furnishing water of a satisfactory quality for drinking pur- 
poses. In this class may be included Batesville, Hazleton, Marengo, 
Petersburg, Winamac, Vernon, Vevay and Rochester. Syracuse and 

^Resigned July 81, 1922. 
19—22978 



290 Year Book 

Hobart are making changes in their sources of water supply which it 
is hoped will render them potable. 

Satisfactory and efficient water supplies, sewerage systems and 
sewage disposal plants are very important to a growing industrial city. 
The city of Gary was planned in advance to have a satisfactory water 
supply and an adequate sewerage system. The city has grown under 
industrial influence from a community of a few persons to a city of 
56,000 in less than twenty years. It is an assured fact that large 
industries and manufacturers refuse to locate their plants in cities not 
having sufficient safe water supplies and sewerage facilities. 

The streams of Indiana are known to be grossly polluted. Several 
cities have already installed sewage treatment plants, and in the near 
future many other cities which discharge their sewage into rivers, lakes 
or small streams will be compelled to consider the problem in order that 
the community located downstream may not be endangered. The city 
of Indianapolis was forced to construct a sewage treatment plant because 
its sewage was polluting White River for a distance of many miles 
below the city. Inasmuch as Indianapolis takes its water supply largely 
from White River, other cities located above and emptying raw 
sewage into the river should make investigations of the conditions pro- 
duced and take whatever steps necessary to prevent dangerous pollu- 
tion. The Grand Calumet River is grossly polluted and should be made 
more sanitary. To accomplish this all industries discharging sewage 
into the river and the cities of Hammond, East Chicago and Whiting 
should make joint sanitary surveys looking to the elimination of exist- 
ing unsatisfactory conditions at the earliest possible date. With small 
streams and limited flows in dry, hot weather, smaller communities 
should make investigations of their sewerage conditions and act to pre- 
vent nuisances. Many citizens hold the opinion that their city is not 
liable for nuisances and since the putrefying sewage is discharged from 
the sewer into the small stream some distance away from the city and 
as the odor and nuisance does not bother them the contaminated stream 
is forgotten. However, suits have been instituted and damages paid 
by cities for allowing this practice to continue. Industries, including 
canneries, tanneries, condensed milk companies, chemical manufacturers, 
food product companies are also liable when the waste products from 
their factories pollute the nearby streams to such an extent that resi- 
dents in the vicinity suffer from the odor and stench created by putrefy- 
ing wastes. 

Sanitary surveys on pollution have been made during the year at 
Newcastle, Brookville, Brazil, Marengo, Connersville, Lebanon, Law- 
renceburg, Michigan City, Oakland City, Bethany Park, Gary, Uni- 
versity Heights, Shelbyville, Frankfort, Huntingburg, Mulberry, Sellers- 
burg, Huntington, Broad Ripple, Lake Wuwasee, Mount Vernon, Water- 
loo and Bloomington. 

The most important function of the Water and Sewage Department 
is the protection and the advancement of health and comfort of living. 
The department earnestly desires to render a service to the citizens of 
the state by collecting and submitting accurate information pertaining 
to sanitary conditions and practices, thus enabling the citizens to re- 



State Board of Health 



291 



quest and obtain efficient and safe operation and supervision of local 
plants. 

The number of analyses made by the laboratory has been increased 
over sixteen per cent for the year 1922 as compared with the year 
1921. Examinations have been made of practically every public water 
supply in the state. All bottled, commercial waters, soft drinks and 
ice supplies have been examined as required by the water analysis act 
of 1919, Chapter 166. The director of the Water and Sewage Depart- 
ment is, by appointment, collaborating sanitary engineer of the United 
States Public Health Service. This appointment gives the Water and 
Sewage Department jurisdiction over the water supplies furnishing 
water to interstate carriers for drinking. Three thousand nine hun- 
dred forty-six samples were examined in the laboratory during the fiscal 
year. Bacteriological analyses were made on 2,400 samples and chemi- 
cal and bacteriological analyses on 1,546 samples. 

The tabulations following show the distribution of these samples as 
to source and quality. The last table shows a summary of analyses 
covering the water treatment plants in the state, giving the percentage 
of satisfactory tests for comparison, together with the source of supply. 



Table No. 1 
Total Samples Analyzed for the Year 1921-1922 





Deep 
Wells 


Shal- 
low 
Wells 


Cis- 
terns 


Springs 


Ponds 
and 
Lakes 


Streams 


Miscel- 
laneous 


Ice 


Com'l and 
Bottled 
Waters 


Total 


Good 

Bad 


764 
331 


262 

563 


10 
34 


85 
79 


95 
44 


511 

170 


99 
84 


293 
45 


415 
62 


2,534 
1,412 


Total 


1,095 


825 


44 


164 


139 


681 


183 


338 


477 


3,946 


Table No. 2 
Total Chemical Samples Analysed for the Year 1921-1922 




Deep 
Wells 


Shal- 
low 

Wells 


Cis- 
terns 


Springs 


Ponds 
and 
Lakes 


Streams 


Miscel- 
laneous 


Ice 


Com'l and 
Bottled 
Waters 


Total 


Good 

Bad 


'508 
221 


135 
450 


9 
26 


35 
55 


14 
10 


35 
33 


3 
5 


4 


3 


746 
800 










Total 


729 


585 


35 


90 


24 


68 


8 


4 


3 


1,546 


Table No. 3 
Total Bacteriological Samples Analyzed for the Year 1921-1922 




Deep 
Wells 


Shal- 
low 

Wells 


Cis- 
terns 


Springs 


Ponds 
and 
Lakes 


Streams 


Miscel- 
laneous 


Ice 


Com'l and 
Bottled 

Waters 


Total 


Good 

Bad 


256 
110 


127 
113 


1 
8 


50 
24 


81 
34 


476 
137 


96 

79 


289 
45 


412 
62 


1,788 
612 


Total 


366 


240 


9 


74 


115 


613 


175 


334 


474 


2,400 



292 



Year Book 



Table No. 4 
Total Private Supplies Examined for the Year 1921- 



■ 


Deep 
Wells 


Shal- 
low 
Wells 


Cis- 
terns 


Springs 


Ponds 
and 
Lakes 


Streams 


Miscel- 
laneous 


Ice 


Com'l and 
Bottled 
Waters 


Total 


Good 

Bad 


454 

277 


164 
550 


10 
34 


43 
66 


7 
10 


1 

23 


99 
84 


293 
45 


415 
62 


1,486 
1,151 


Total 


731 


714 


44 


109 


17 


24 


183 


338 


477 


2,637 



Table No. 5 

Total Public Supplies Examined for the Year 1921-1922 





Deep 
Wells 


Shal- 
low 
Wells 


Cis- 
terns 


Springs 


Ponds 
and 
Lakes 


Streams 


Miscel- 
laneous 


Ice 


Com'l and 
Bottled 
Waters 


Total 


Good 


310 
54 


98 
13 




42 
13 


' 88 
34 


510 
147 








1,048 


Bad 








261 












Total 


364 


111 




55 


122 


657 








1,309 













Table No. 6 
Quality of Supplies Expressed in Percent. 



Source 


Private 

Supplies 


Public 

Supplies 


Per Cent Good 


Per Cent Bad 


Private 


Public 


Private 


Public 


Deep Wells 


731 
714 
44 
109 
17 
24 
183 
338 
477 


364 
111 


62.11 
22.97 
22.73 
39.45 
41.18 
4.35 
54.10 
86.69 
87.00 


85.17 
88.29 


37.89 
77.03 
77.27 
60.55 
58.82 
95.65 
45.90 
13.31 
13.00 


14.83 


Shallow Wells 


11.71 








55 
122 
657 


76.37 
72.13 
77.63 


23.63 




27.87 


Streams 


22.37 






























Total 


2,637 


1,309 


56.36 


80.06 


43.64 


19.94 







State Board of Health 



293 



SUMMARY WEEKLY BACTERIOLOGICAL REPORTS ON FILE OCTOBER, 1921, TO OCTOBER, 1922, 
WATER AND SEWAGE DEPARTMENT INDIANA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 



Name op City 

Where Plaijt is 

Located 



No. of Tests 



1 cc. 10 cc. 



Good Tests 



cc. 10 cc. 



Per Cent Good 



10 cc. 



General Remarks 



Anderson 

Aurora 

Bedford 

•Bloomington . . 
•Brazil 

Boonville 

fColumbus 

Corydon 

"Covington — 

East Chicago. 

Evansville 

*Gary 

Greencastle... 

Greenwood... 

*Hammond 

^Indianapolis. . 

Jasper 

Lebanon 

Liberty 

Logansport . . . 
"Michigan City 

Mitchell 

*Mt. Vernon. . , 
JMontpelier... 
JMuncie 

New Albany.. 

Paoli 

•Princeton .... 

Richmond 

Seymour 

•Shelbyville.... 

Sheridan 

Terre Haute.. 
J Valparaiso 

Vincennes 

§ Warsaw 

Washington. . 

West Baden . . 

Whiting 



,444 

2 

80 

102 

4 

70 
92 
24 

88 
2 



54 
70 
102 



2 

70 
728 
2 
74 
48 
54 
86 
64 



170 

155 

195 

15 

10 

140 

190 

120 

5 



161 

151 

188 

12 

10 

102 

168 

111 

5 



94.7 
97.4 
96.4 
80.0 



72.8 
83.2 
92.5 



304 Samples — Total Percentage 9 
' 100 



1,805 


1,444 


5 


2 


200 


73 


255 


102 


10 


4 



1,756 

5 I 

164 91 

244 I 100 
10 



3.26 

97.3 



82.0 
95.7 



,304 Samples— Total Percentage 98.7 



140 


69 


110 


230 


90 


224 


60 


24 


52 


220 


86 


207 


5 


2 


5 


115 


38 


88 


15 


6 


15 


135 


50 


128 


175 


68 


161 


255 


99 


241 


110 


37 


73 


15 


5 


12 


30 


12 


30 


165 


60 


150 


5 


2 


5 


140 


70 


131 


1,825 


728 


1,753 


1,102 


2 


1,050 


185 


71 


169 


120 


47 


115 


135 


54 


133 


215 


81 


183 


160 


56 


121 



100, 

100. 

100 
96 
97, 

100, 
94, 
87, 



78.5 
97.4 
86.6 
94.1 



76.5 



94.7 
92.0 
94.5 
66.4 
80.0 
100.0 
90.9 



93.5 
96.1 
95.3 
91.3 

95.8 
98.7 
85.1 
75.6 



White River — Filtered — Chlorinated. 
Ohio River — Filtered— Chlorinated. 
White River— Settled. 
Impounded — Settled — Chlorinated. 
Wells — Chlorine reserve. 
Impounded — Chlorinated (only). 
Driftwood River — Filtered — Chlorina'd. 
Surface Spring — Chlorinated. 
Spring Wells — Chlorine reserve. 
Lake Michigan — Filtered — Chlorinated. 
Ohio River — 'Filtered — Chlorinated. 
Lake Michigan — Chlorinated. 
WalnutCreek — Filter gallery — Chlorine. 
Wells 56 feet deep — Hypochlorite. 
Lake Michigan — Chlorinated. 
White River — Filtered — Chlorinated. 
Patoka River — Filtered (only). 
Wells— Chlorinated. 
Spring — Chlorinated . 
Eel River — Filtered — Chlorinated. 
Lake Michigan — Chlorinated. 
White River — Filtered — Chlorinated. 
Ohio River — Filtered — Hypo. 
Salamonie River — Filtered — Chlorina'd . 
White River — Filtered — Chlorinated. 
Ohio River— Filtered — Chlorinated. 
Lick Creek — Filtered — Hypo. 
Patoka River — Filtered — Chlorinated . 
Galleries — Chlorine in reserve. 
White River-Filtration-Chlorination. 
Shallow Wells— Chlorinated. 
Weils — Chlorinated . 
Wabash River — Filtered — Chlorinated. 
Flint Lake — Filtered — Chlorinated. 
Wabash River — Filtered — Chlorinated. 
Center Lake — Hypochlorite. 
White River — Filtered — Chlorinated. 
Lost River — Filtered — Chlorinated. 
Lake Michigan — Filtered — Chlorinated. 



* Lack of samples sent in does not allow a fair yearly percentage, 
t Ran out of chlorine December, 1921, which lowered yearly average, 
j Plants have both river and well supply. 
§ Pump out of Lake only for reserve. 

FIELD SURVEYS 

The field surveys during the fiscal year were made by the depart- 
ment with the object of co-operating and assisting in every way pos- 
sible in obtaining the most efficient, satisfactory and adequate water 
supplies, sewage treatment plants and sewerage systems in order that 
the public at large could have the greatest comfort and the best of 
healthful living conditions. Through the knowledge obtained from field 
surveys the Water and Sewage Department of the Indiana State Board 
of Health hopes to become a clearing house for information and prove 
itself a real asset to the state. Through the various inspections of water 
supplies, sewage nuisances and stream pollution the department has 
done much to aid in bringing about better sanitation and more health- 
ful conditions in the towns and cities in the state. Co-operation has 
been freely and generously given, in the main, by operators and super- 
intendents of water supplies and city and health officials and has aided 
materially the work of the department. 



294 Year Book 

The following is a summary of the reports of field surveys made 
during the year: 

West Baden: An investigation was made of the water supply at 
West Baden which showed under-treatment with chlorine. It was rec- 
ommended that chlorine be increased automatically when the water 
becomes turbid. 

An inspection was made of the water supply equipment which fur- 
nished the West Baden Springs Hotel with water. It was recommended 
that a better building be built and that the pumps be installed on per- 
manent foundations. 

A visit was paid the flowing springs of the West Baden Hotel Com- 
pany and recommendations were made on several of the springs which 
were not flowing sufficiently. 

Paoli: An investigation was made of the water supply at Paoli 
and recommendations that the building walls, which had settled, be re- 
paired and the plant be given proper operating attention. 

Shirley: A survey was made of the water supply at Shirley and 
it was recommended that the well pit be cleaned out and kept clean. 
Analyses of the water from Shirley showed a satisfactory water de- 
livered to the public. 

Mitchell: An inspection was made of the Mitchell water supply 
and it was recommended that chlorine be used in sufficient quantities to 
make the water satisfactory at all times. 

West Newton: An inspection was made of the school well at West 
Newton and recommendations made to place it in a sanitary condition. 

Brookville: A sanitary survey was made of the ditch flowing along 
the railroad and the canal basin pond at Brookville, and it was recom- 
mended that the pond be drained and the ditch be allowed to flow back 
into the river. 

Martinsville: The Martinsville water supply was visited and it was 
recommended that the shallow wells from which the water is taken be 
protected in every way from surface drainage. 

Logansport: An inspection was made of the Logansport water 
plant and recommendations were made to increase the size of the sedi- 
mentation basin. Plans have been prepared for this new basin to be 
built in the race and work will be carried on in the near future. 

Brazil: A visit was made Brazil and a meeting held with the city 
engineer and consulting engineer for the new sewage disposal plant and 
the details of construction discussed. Several recommendations were 
made and the plans were changed accordingly. 

Jeffersonville: An inspection was made of the water supply for the 
quartermaster's supply depot and it was suggested that the water sup- 
ply be changed oftener in the reserve reservoirs. The pumping equip- 
ment was found to be in first-class operating condition. 



State Board of Health 295 

Cory don: A survey was made of the Cory don water supply and it 
was recommended that all toilets on the slope of the hills adjacent be 
removed. The supply is delivering a very fair quality of water with 
chlorination, to the public. 

North Vernon: The new water supply of North Vernon was visited 
and it was recommended that the Water and Sewage Department be 
given more information and analyses of the water delivered. North 
Vernon this year completed a new sedimentation basin and a high lift 
pump house. The water is settled and chlorinated. 

Boonville: An inspection was made of the Boonville water supply 
and it was recommended that a filter plant be installed to remove the 
turbidity of the impounded water. It was also suggested that the 
chlorine feed be increased when the water was turbid. 

Princeton: An investigation was made of the Princeton water sup- 
ply situation and several changes were recommended. These changes 
have been made this year and the plant is producing a fair filtered and 
chlorinated supply. 

Marengo: An inspection was made of the Marengo water supply 
and it was recommended that the water be chlorinated before same was 
delivered to the public. 

Tipton: The Tipton water supply was visited and it was suggested 
that the second compressor be placed in operating condition and the 
supply be carefully watched. 

Hagerstown: A private well was inspected from which the railroad 
men obtain drinking water. Recommendations were given to protect the 
well from surface water. Upon analysis the water was found to be 
satisfactory. 

Connersville : A sanitary survey was made of the storm water 
overflow of the Seventh street sewer and it was strongly recommended 
that the conditions which exist in the river bottom be changed at 
once. The sewage stands in the pool at the outfall and causes a 
nuisance to the citizens living close by. 

An investigation was made of the country club water supply in 
Connersville and it was recommended that all water used for drinking 
purposes be boiled. 

Montpelier: An inspection was made of the Montpelier water- 
works and it was suggested that, the chlorine be increased and that 
more samples be sent in from the plant to the Water and Sewage De- 
partment laboratories. 

Hartford City: An investigation was made of the Hartford City 
water supply and it was recommended that additional water be obtained 
from a new well. The condition of the equipment was found to be good. 

Lebanon: A survey was made of the new sewage treatment plant 
and it was found that the plant was somewhat overloaded. It was 



296 Year Book 

recommended that close touch be kept with the Water and Sewage De- 
partment and that the operation be carefully watched. 

Lawrenceburg: An investigation was made of the Hawthorne Mill- 
ing Company cattle barns at Lawrenceburg. It was found that if dry 
feed be given the cattle, close attention be given to cleaning the barns, 
and the creek not polluted, that cattle could be kept in the barns. 

Michigan City: The Rommel ditch proposition at Michigan City 
was investigated and it was recommended that the lowlands to the 
southwest of the city be drained into the lake and that an adequate 
sewer be laid on the present site of the Rommel ditch. 

Huntington: An inspection was made of the Huntington water 
supply and the equipment found to be in good operating condition. A 
small leak in the suction well was repaired and the water was later 
found to be satisfactory for all purposes. It was also suggested that 
close attention be given to the condition of the water pumped to the 
city. 

Hammond: An investigation was made of the Hammond water 
supply and recommendations made concerning the size of the sludge 
pipe and other details of construction of the new sedimentation basin. 
With the construction of a new pumping station, boiler plant and sedi- 
mentation basin it is hoped that the water department will deliver a 
satisfactory water to the city of Hammond. 

Hobart: An inspection was made of the Hobart water supply and 
it was recommended that deep wells be driven to determine if water 
could be obtained from this source. This work is being carried on this 
year. 

Whiting: The filter plant and pumping station of the city of Whit- 
ing was inspected and it was recommended that the laboratories be 
placed in operation and that a close watch be kept on the condition of 
the water delivered to the city. Due to the proximity of the Standard 
Oil Company of Indiana the water has a decided oily taste and odor 
periodically, which means that a close, efficient operation of the plant 
must be maintained. 

Huntingburg : At the request of the engineer retained by the city 
of Huntingburg a visit was made and the new plans for a sewer sys- 
tem and septic tank discussed. Several details of construction were 
taken up at this time and it is hoped that Huntingburg will be fur- 
nished with an adequate sewer system. 

An inspection was made of the water supply of the city of Hunt- 
ingburg and it was recommended that a filter plant be built and that 
the water be chlorinated. 

Cartersburg: A visit was paid the springs of the Cartersburg 
Springs Company and the condition of the springs and bottling house 
was found to be good. 



State Board of Health 297 

North Liberty: The Wabash Railroad well at North Liberty was 
inspected and from the results of the analyses the water supply was 
found to be satisfactory. 

Indianapolis: The bottling plant of the Mount Jackson Mineral 
Springs Company was visited and the bottling equipment found to be 
in first-class condition. 

Oakland City: The sanitary conditions of the city of Oakland City 
were investigated and found to be bad. It was recommended that a 
sewer system be constructed to relieve the open drain in the gutter from 
pollution. 

An inspection was made of the water supply at Oakland City and 
it was recommended that a second lake be made, then an adequate sup- 
ply could be furnished. It was also suggested that an engineer be re- 
tained and that the water be treated with chlorine. 

Plainfield: An investigation was made of the Plainfield water sup- 
ply and it was recommended that the equipment be painted and kept in 
better operating condition. 

An inspection of the water supply for the Indiana Boys' School was 
made and found to be in satisfactory operating condition. The Imhoff 
tank which receives the waste from the institution was opened up and 
it was suggested that this be cleaned, that the walls of the settling 
basin be raised, and the sludge cleaned out at the first freshet. 

Walkerton: An inspection was made of the Walkerton water sup- 
ply, which was found to be in good operating condition. 

An inspection was made of a private well at Walkerton which had 
been polluted from an oil receiving station close by. It was recom- 
mended that this water be condemned for drinking purposes. 

Valparaiso : An inspection was made of the Valparaiso water sup- 
ply, which was found to be in good operating condition. 

A report was made concerning the pollution of the lakes from which 
Valparaiso receives its water supply. It was recommended that closer 
supervision be kept over the summer tourists so that the lakes would 
not be polluted. 

Cartersburg : An inspection was made of the White Lick springs, 
located approximately three miles from Cartersburg, and recommenda- 
tions were given on the method of handling the water. 

GreencoMle: At the request of the health officer of Greencastle an 
inspection was made of the Greencastle supply and it was found that 
the infiltration galleries had broken through and the water supply was 
very turbid. A new chlorinator was installed this year and since that 
time the city water supply has been very satisfactory bacteriologically. 

Bethany Park: An inspection was made of the Bethany Park, lo- 
cated near Brooklyn, and it was recommended that all outside toilets 
be removed from the lake front, that the main water supply be placed 
in sanitary condition even if a new well must be driven and that the 



298 Year Book 

lake be dredged out so as to relieve the lowland located on the north- 
west side. 

Winona Lake: An investigation was made of the Winona Lake 
sanitary conditions, which were found to be fair. It was recommended 
that another septic tank be built and that close supervision be held over 
swimming in the lake. There were quite a few people at Winona Lake 
who had typhoid fever this year; however, this did not come from the 
water supply, inasmuch as the analyses always showed a satisfactory 
water for all purposes. 

An inspection was made of the water supply at Winona Lake, 
which was found to be in good operating condition. 

Terre Haute: The Terre Haute water works was visited and found 
to be in very satisfactory operating condition. Analyses are made daily 
on the water supply and close supervision held over the equipment. 

Sullivan: An inspection was made of the Sullivan water supply 
and it was recommended that close supervision be kept over the force 
main and since this line was of wood stave that it be kept under pres- 
sure at all times. 

Gary: The Burns ditch proposition was investigated thoroughly at 
Gary and it was recommended that this construction work be carried 
on in the very near future so as to reclaim approximately 20,000 acres 
in the Little Calumet marsh. 

University Heights: A sanitary survey was made at University 
Heights and bad sanitary conditions were found. It was recommended 
that University Heights build a sewerage system and that until this 
time that the raw sewage from the houses be kept from this covered 
drain. 

Frankfort: A sanitary survey was made of the stream into which 
the Frankfort sewage is discharged. Conditions were found to be very 
bad and it was recommended and ordered by the State Board of Health 
that a sewage disposal plant be built in the near future. 

Indianapolis: A private driven well located outside the city limits 
of Indianapolis was investigated and condemned. 

Mulberry: A sanitary survey was made in Mulberry and the 
sanitary conditions of the storm water drains were found to be very 
bad. The effluent from these covered lines emptied into an open ditch 
which ran along the road and across the property of several farmers. 
It was recommended that a sewerage system be built and carried to a 
septic tank located on the banks of the stream several miles away. 

Scottsburg : An inspection was made of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
driven well at Scottsburg, which was found to be in fair operating con- 
dition. The analyses, however, showed a polluted water supply and it 
was recommended that this water should not be used in the shops and 
on interstate carriers. 

The driven well of the Interstate Interurban Company was in- 



State Board of Health 299 

spected and it was recommended that since the analyses showed a bad 
water that the well be condemned for use for drinking water on board 
the interurban cars. 

Whiting: A sanitary survey was made of Stitletz Park Addition, 
located to the south of Whiting, and the conditions found were very 
dangerous. With the raised ground located on three sides of this ad- 
dition, water stands in the cellars of most of the houses. It was recom- 
mended that the city of Whiting provide a drain for this addition, 
namely a storm water sewer, and that the city of Whiting clean up this 
addition that better healthful conditions might prevail. 

t* Sellersburg : A sanitary survey was made of the Y. W. C. A. camp 
at Sellersburg and comparing the dug well inspection with analyses 
made, it was recommended that the water supply be condemned. It 
was also suggested that the water be boiled from these wells. The con- 
dition of the lake for swimming was found to be very good. 

Huntington: A sanitary survey was made of the main sewer out- 
fall at Huntington and it was noticed that the stream into which the 
sewer discharges was in very bad sanitary condition. It was recom- 
mended that the sewer be carried on at least one-quarter of a mile down 
stream in a large interceptor so as to rid the city of this nuisance. 

Broad Ripple: An investigation was made of a private septic tank 
for two apartment buildings located at Broad Ripple. It was recom- 
mended that an absorption system be installed to relieve the conditions. 

Lake Wawasee: A sanitary inspection was made of the septic 
tanks of the Sargent Hotel and it was recommended that a tile absorp- 
tion system be installed in the sands so that the effluent from the septic 
tank would not flow into the lake. 

A sanitary inspection was made of the South Shore Inn at Lake 
Wawasee and conditions were found to be satisfactory. 

An inspection was made of the conditions at Buttermilk Point and 
it was recommended that if the grounds could not be kept clean, and 
the place in general sanitary condition, the resort would be ordered to 
do so. 

Mount Vernon: At the request of the water company a meeting 
was held with the council and the water works officials at Mount Ver- 
non to discuss the construction of the new sewer. It was recommended 
that those sewers discharging near the water works intake be carried 
down stream farther, that the mouth of Mill Creek be dredged and that 
analyses be made of the raw river water to determine whether a filter 
plant would be overloaded after this south side sewer was completed. 

Syracuse: An inspection was made of the water works plant at 
Syracuse and it was recommended that the new proposed wells be 
placed in operation as soon as possible. Syracuse at present is pumping 
raw river water into the city, which is extremely dangerous to the many 
tourists who travel through the city. 



300 Year Book 

Waterloo: A sanitary inspection was made of the city of Waterloo 
and it was recommended that the city lay a storm water drain across 
the railroad right of way to handle the run-off from the lowlands above 
the Y. 

Pendleton: An inspection was made of Idlewald Park, located near 
Pendleton. The sanitary conditions of the park were found to be good, 
but the analyses of the two spring waters showed slight surface pollu- 
tion. It was recommended that the spring located near the deep well 
be analyzed again and if bad the use of the water for drinking pur- 
poses be prohibited. 

North Vernon: An inspection was made of several private wells 
located near the Baltimore and Ohio shops the analysis of which showed 
an undesirable water for drinking purposes. The driven well located 
outside of Conner's restaurant was found to be satisfactory. 

Greenfield: During the month of July and August there was a 
rather severe epidemic of typhoid fever at Greenfield. The water sup- 
ply was investigated and found to be satisfactory. Several recommenda- 
tions were made concerning the sewage disposal dump located above the 
city. 

Bloomington : Due to the hot, dry season the city of Bloomington 
has been without adequate water supply for some time. It was recom- 
mended in a meeting with the city officials that the closest supervision 
be kept over the sewerage system and that every precaution be taken 
that no epidemic occur during this water famine. It was strongly rec- 
ommended that no matter where the water came from which was to be 
used for drinking purposes that it be boiled. Engineers are at present 
working on a report to construct a more adequate water works system 
for the city of Bloomington and it is hoped that this situation may 
never occur again. The university authorities had sufficient foresight 
to prepare for such emergency and the university has its own water, 
which will furnish the university with water for sixty days. 

Inspections and surveys were also made of water supplies at New- 
castle, Richmond, Connersville, West Lafayette, Elkhart, Plymouth, South 
Bend, Indianapolis, Fort Wayne, Jeffersonville, New Albany, Vincennes, 
Rockport, Anderson, Evansville, Seymour, Noblesville, Brazil, Bluffton, 
Muncie, Lebanon, Kokomo, Gary, East Chicago, Greenwood, Greensburg, 
Laporte, Valparaiso, Washington, Union City, Madison, Garrett, Con- 
verse, Terre Haute and Crawfordsville. These water supplies are in 
good operating condition and deliver a very satisfactory water to the 
consumer. With the inspections and surveys made at Columbus, Bed- 
ford, Goshen, Mishawaka, Logansport, Mount Vernon, Newburgh, Peru, 
Lafayette, Michigan City, Lawrenceburg, North Liberty, Shelbyville, 
Greenfield, Waterloo, Portland and Butler recommendations were given 
in regard to operating equipment or source of supply which had no. 
bearing on the quality of the water delivered. In the main, changes have 
been made and these plants also deliver a satisfactory water to the 
consumer. 



State Board op Health 301 

REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF OIL INSPECTION 

I. L. MILLER, State Food and Drug Commissioner, Supervisor. 
*EDWARD F. WARFEL, Chief Clerk. 
JAMES I. INLOW, Chief Clerk. 

INSPECTORS 

*Einecke, Albert, Terre Haute. 

Anderson, Cary E., Terre Haute. 

Ankrom, Mike, Portland. 

Bartlett, J. D., Lafayette. 

Bowen, Forest J., Peru. 
*Batty, Raymond H., Indianapolis. 

Braxton, Samuel H., Paoli. 

Breining, Wm. A., Delphi. 

Ephlin, J. H., Kingman. 
*Patton, Edward, Veedersburg. 

Edwards, C. E., Connersville. 

Hillman, John, Gary. 

Jarrett, J. Everett, Indianapolis. 

Jones, John A., Marion. 

Lillicrap, A. 0., Evansville. 
* Chapman, Roy K., Evansville. 

Marlar, Everett, South Bend. 

Malott, Claude G., Bloomington. 

Mason, B. F., St. Paul. 

Millican, Walter N., New Albany. 

McCarty, E. A., Indianapolis. 

Matthews, Walter T., Centerville. 
*Taylor, John H., Richmond. 

Rasor, Aaron A., Warsaw. 

Reat, Arthur, Greencastle. 

Risk, W. L., New Castle. 
*Ritter, Frank C, New Castle. 

Row, J. C, Osgood. 
*Matthews, Homer L., North Vernon. 

Ritchie, Fred L., Rochester. 

Spaulding, Frank B., Sharpsville. 

Summers, Wm. W., Alexandria. 

Tichner, Henry, Princeton. 

Wagner, Herman, Vincennes. 

Weaver, Theron P., Fort Wayne. 

Whyte, Ray, Auburn. 

Breedlove, M. A., Centerton. 

The Department of Oil Inspection, under the law of 1919, is charged 
with the inspection of petroleum products, for which a fee is collected 
and returned to the state treasury. Kerosene is tested by means of 
the Foster automatic cup and gasoline; naphtha and similar petroleum 
products are branded as provided by law. 

♦Resigned. 



302 



Year Book 



The act provides an appropriation of $500 for the salary of the 
food and drug commissioner who supervises the work of the depart- 
ment and allows him an additional $3,600 for clerical assistance in ad- 
ministering the law. Of this amount, $3,000 was paid to the chief clerk 
and accountant who directs the work of inspection, and an additional 
$300 for clerical help, leaving $300 to revert to the treasury. The law 
provides that the oil inspectors shall receive $125 per month and neces- 
sary traveling expenses, while actually employed in the work. 

The following tables indicate the work done by the inspectors dur- 
ing the fiscal year, as well as office expenses incurred. 

RECEIPTS 



Month 


Barrels 
Kerosene 
Inspected 


Barrels 
Gasoline 
Inspected 


Fees 
Collected 


October. 1921 


91,016 
63,073 
55,500 
66,053 
53,241 
60,814 
77,931 
125,165 
71,038 
79,684 
82,738 
60,968 


319,266 
243,318 
193,080 
211,646 
162,733 
203,739 
244,960 
362,512 
275,914 
366,165 
373,714 
294,348 


$16,612 31 


November, 1921 


12,180 14 


December, 1921 


10,201 71 




11,078 67 


February, 1922 


8,591 45 


March, 1922 


10,521 57 


April, 1922 


12,620 94 


May, 1922 


18,449 66 


June, 1922 


12,584 36 


July, 1922 


19,188 68 


August, 1922 


17,427 25 


September, 1922 


14,008 69 






Totals 


587,821 


3,251,395 


$163,465 43 







EXPENDITURES (Inspectors) 





Month 


Salaries 


Expenses 


October, 1921 


$3,626 00 
3,625 00 
3,625 00 
3,625 00 
3,625 00 
3,500 00 
3,625 00 
3,741 67 
3,262 50 
3,562 50 
3,459 63 
3,250 00 


$2,460 26 


November, 1921 


1,862 94 


December, 1921 


1,584 86 




1,812 88 


February, 1922 


1,356 43 


March 1922 


1,646 36 


April, 1922 


2,099 18 


May, 1922 


2,623 02 


June, 1922 


1,994 31 


July, 1922 


2,612 09 


August, 1922 


2,610 25 


September, 1922 


1,859 27 








Total 


$42,401 30 


$24,521 85 






42,401 30 




$66,923 15 









OFFICE EXPENSE 

Stamps $150 00 

Western Union 2 42 

Burroughs adding machine 205 80 

Express 4 77 

Printing 381 02 

Inspectors' badges 12 50 

File case 32 50 

Map and index folders 4 35 

Foster cups 64 33 



State Board of Health 303 

Special investigation — traveling expenses 34 90 

Total office expense $892 59 

TOTAL EXPENSES 

Total expenditures (inspectors) $66,923 15 

Office expense 892 59 

Administrative salaries 3,800 00 

Total expenses $71,615 74 

Total receipts $163,465 43 

Total expenditures 71,615 74 

Net to state $91,849 69 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF INFANT AND CHILD HYGIENE 

Ada E. Schweitzer, M. D., Director. 
FOREWORD 

During the fiscal year the Division of Infant and Child Hygiene 
greatly extended the scope of its work. This was made possible by the 
employment in February of a field physician and by the temporary 
employment, as the occasion arose, of physicians, nurses and other as- 
sistants. As a consequence, with the exception of January and Febru- 
ary, field work has been practically continuous. The acceptance by the 
governor of the provisions of the Sheppard-Towner Act augmented some- 
what the funds available for this work. The popular interest in child 
health, however, has been growing to a proportion far beyond the com- 
pass of funds available; it has been necessary to refuse wholly or par- 
tially numerous requests for assistance. 

FIELD EQUIPMENT 

Child hygiene car. 

Moving picture machine. 

Films— "Our Children," "Priceless Gift of Health," "Mouth Hygiene," 

"Through Life's Windows," "State Child Hygiene Activities." 
Obstetric outfits. 
Layette — complete. 
Artificial feeding apparatus. 
Complete nursery. 
Charts (250), panels, maps, etc.. 
Photographs. 
Stereopticon slides. 
Scales, two sets. 

PLAN OF WORK 

I. Office Activities. 
II. Organization. 
III. County Child Health Conferences. 



304 Year Book 

IV. Special Child Health Conferences. 
V. Baby Contests. 

VI. Eest Tents for Mothers and Babies. 
VIL Special talks on Maternal, Infant and Child Care may be included 

also in II, III, IV and V. 
VIII. Special Projects (Child Hygiene Week at Winona Lake Chau- 
tauqua, etc.). 
IX. Local "Follow Up." 
X. Division "Follow Up." 
XI. Correlation. 

I. Office Activities include — 

Routine correspondence. 

Routing field parties. 

Sending out supplies to field party, nurses and others. 

Special organization letters to health officers, physicians, commit- 
tees, chairmen, etc. Lists of things needed, articles furnished, question- 
naires, literature to expectant mothers, to other individuals and to field 
party. 

Statistical reports. 

II. Organization. 

Wherever possible organization of a district, county or a town is 
left to local agencies. When time is limited, or perhaps for some other 
reason, a person from the division is sent to assist in the selection of 
chairmen and to give instructions personally. As soon as a program of 
dates and towns is sent to the office typed letters with mimeographed 
instructions are sent to county and township chairmen. Selection of 
committees on arrangements, enrollment, meeting places, entertainment 
program, transportation, etc., is left to local chairmen, who also arrange 
through committees for buildings, lights, heat, electric current, local 
transportation and housing for staff. Local agencies bear local expenses; 
the state pays staff expenses. 

The coming child health conference is advertised by personal calls 
on mothers, by telephone, newspaper publicity, by announcements in 
schools, churches, and other public places. Often posters made by local 
agencies are put up in conspicuous places. Needed assistance is also 
given to localities trying to establish permanent child health work. 

III. County Child Health Conferences. 

When the preliminary organization is complete, the child hygiene 
staff is sent into the county with the "baby health car." The routine 
program may be modified to suit local conditions. Usually the evening 
program with the moving picture precedes the day examination — a pre- 
liminary program is often furnished by local children. 

Examination of Children. 

The parents voluntarily bring children, usually under school age, for 
examination. After the registration the history of mother care and 
baby care, and previous illness is taken, a development test is given to 
children of five or under and vision and hearing tests to children over 
five. The mother removes the clothing and ties on a square of shaker 



State Board op Health 305 

flannel, the child is weighed and measured and has his height and weight 
checked up; he is given a complete physical examination and dressed. 
The doctor and nurse talk over with the mother the child's condition and 
suitable pamphlets are given the mother. The child receives a health 
reader or a Cho Cho book, which help make him a willing ally of his 
parents in the health game. One record of the child's health is given to 
parent or guardian, one to county nurse and one is sent to the child 
hygiene office for statistical purposes. 

When time permits, talks or demonstrations by nurses or physi- 
cians on maternal and infant care are given to groups of women and 
girls. At four or five o'clock equipment is packed and the staff moves 
on to the next place for an evening program. A total of 9,301 children 
have been examined in these conferences in 1922. 

Parents who voluntarily bring children can usually be relied upon 
to take care of needed improvements in routine or correction of defects. 
Often a nurse or social worker will help find the way. Many times the 
parent is advised to have the child placed under supervision of the 
family physician, or of a specialist; occasionally hospital care is needed 
for a while. 

IV. Special Child Health Conferences. 

These are held by the child hygiene staff to assist a locality in 
establishing some project, as a baby health station, nursing service, etc. 
Often the baby conference is a part of a big community program. 

Special examinations of children under the supervision of child 
hygiene field workers took place at Madison Fall Festival, Indiana Health 
Institute, St. Paul's M. E. Church (city), Zionsville, Fairmount, La- 
fontaine, Fowler, Spencer and Bridgeton. 

V. Baby Contests. (State Fair.) 

Once a year the Child Hygiene Division devotes a week to "check- 
ing up" the best Indiana babies at the state fair. The State Board of 
Agriculture employs specialists and any additional help needed. When 
contests in other places are insisted upon, a staff nurse is sometimes 
sent to supervise the routine on condition that local physicians be em- 
ployed to make complete physical examinations and to advise with 
parents. When a contest is so conducted as to benefit the babies it has 
an excuse for being (though a conference is preferred), but when the 
baby is exploited merely to attract crowds the contest is inexcusable. 

The 1922 better baby contest at the state fair was the most suc- 
cessful we have conducted. Three hundred fourteen babies from all 
parts of the state were examined. Ninety-five per cent of them had 
scores of 990 and above and eighty-two babies not in the contest were 
given health tests. Thirty-four counties had within the last three years 
co-operated with the Child Hygiene Division of the State Board of 
Health in the holding of county- wide health conferences. Thirty-one 
counties shared prize-winning honors. While the Child Hygiene Divi- 
sion does not claim all the credit for the high standards of baby 
care in these counties, we have every reason to believe that the educa- 
tional work of the health conferences has been a very helpful, positive 
influence. 

20—22978 



306 Year Book 

The Indiana "Better Baby" folder was designed by the director of 
the Child Hygiene Division, published by the State Board of Agriculture 
and sent out in all correspondence. 

VI. Rest Tents and Rooms. 

At local fairs and festivals there are always persons who bring 
young babies into the dust and crowds. To provide a safe place and 
expert care for the babies, and at the same time give the mother a 
chance in a class or demonstration to receive information first hand con- 
cerning baby care, a rest tent is conducted. 

The Child Hygiene Division furnishes exhibit material and a part 
of pads, blankets, etc., for beds. Equipment such as beds, chairs, tables, 
etc., is furnished by local agencies. The local committee assists the 
child hygiene nurse in the care of children, mothers come to care for 
babies, babies are left with the nurses on condition that the mother re- 
port at regular intervals and pre-school children are made happy with 
blocks, games and a sand pile, while parents view exhibits or hear lec- 
tures. Where the community or county has a nurse she often does 
work of this kind, asking only for charts and literature from the Child 
Hygiene Division. 

These rest tents and rooms were conducted by the child hygiene 
nurse at the northern Indiana fair at Decatur and Ft. Wayne, at chau- 
tauquas, at Osgood, Ripley County, Rockville, Greenfield, Merom, Colum- 
bus fair, and a rest room at the state fair. Exclusive of Ft. Wayne, 
1,384 babies were cared for, and 480 mothers with babies came to the 
tents to rest. At the state fair the baby beds were furnished by the 
Children's Aid Association, electric fans by the Hatfield Electric Com- 
pany, and water was furnished in coolers by Cartersburg and Moun- 
tain Valley Water Companies. 

VII. Special Talks. 

Talks on subjects relating to maternal and infant care are given by 
request. These may be illustrated by use of demonstration material lan- 
tern slides or by moving pictures. Talks form a part of the program in 
each place visited during a county health conference. Special lectures in 
series on baby care were given to the Girls' Home Economics School. 
Three hundred seventy-two lectures were given by members of the staff. 

VIII. Special Projects. 

Baby week at Winona Lake Chautauqua, special health examina- 
tions and instructions to girls and women at the Shelby ville Y. W. C. 
A. health week, at the Purdue Girls' Club Roundup, Girls' Home Eco- 
nomics School at the State Fair were special projects. A special exhibit 
at the New Haven meeting of the American Child Hygiene Association 
showed by subjects the literature distributed by the Indiana Division of 
Child Hygiene, the pamphlets being arranged on large panels. 

IX. Correlation. 

In many communities better correlation of effort on the part of 
local organizations has resulted; when all work together with a common 
objective, much good is accomplished. Over one hundred fifty local and 
state organizations co-operated in the work of the division. During the 



State Board of Health 307 

health conferences, 259 physicians and dentists assisted, 181 nurses and 
1,107 women assisted. The approximate number of meetings held were: 
In churches, 72; schools, 136; parish houses, 3; hotels, 14; Chambers of 
Commerce, 7; woman's building, 3 in one week (state fair); residences, 
5; orphans homes, 2; lodge halls, 15; hospitals, 8; movies, 37; W. C. T. 
U. buildings, 6; Y. M. C. A. buildings, 12; opera houses, 1; auditoriums, 
8; colleges, 2; postoffice buildings, 8; court houses, 34; libraries, 15; Le- 
gion halls, 5 ; settlement houses, 9 ; missions, 4 ; rest tents, 8 ; chautauqua 
tents, 6; open air meetings, 7. 

X. Local "Follow Up." 

The community or county in which a health conference is held often 
carries on health work for children. Many letters in our files tell of the 
improvement in the condition of children. The child may be getting 
more sleep, or a better balanced diet. He may be less irritable, because 
he is not allowed to be nagged or teased or petted. He may have a 
'source of general infection eliminated by treatment of tonsils or teeth. 
Removal of adenoids may have been followed by an improved appetite 
and vigor, greater interest in work and play, better hearing, etc. Cor- 
rection of orthopedic defects may have restored to activity an almost 
helpless child, and correction of vision defects may have changed him 
from an irritable child unable to progress in school to a happy, healthy 
child to whom study is pleasure instead of painful effort. 

There are children whose life, food and daily routine must be 
changed before permanent benefit can be had; this may require the cor- 
related efforts of any available agencies. We know of no instance where 
a child health conference has not been beneficial, but the extent of bene- 
fit received depends in a great measure upon local interst and co-opera- 
tion. 

XI. Division "Follow Up." 

When special projects are planned, members of the Child Hygiene 
staff often revisit communities to assist in starting the work. Litera- 
ture and posters are furnished and follow up letters are written. 

COUNTY CONFERENCES 

LAGRANGE COUNTY 

October 2nd to 10th, the County Superintendent of Schools invited 
Child Hygiene Division to hold Child Health Conference in Lagrange 
County court house during corn school week. Organization of the 
county was effected through the schools, children from groups of town- 
ships being assigned each day for examination. The local physicians, 
county nurse, Tri Kappas and others assisted throughout the week; 
demonstration examinations, talks to clubs, to the Shriners, township 
trustees and moving pictures completed the program. A duplication of 
engagements made necessary an aeroplane trip to Sullivan, Indiana. 
The director talked Monday evening at Graysville and returned to 
Lagrange Tuesday morning. The trip was arranged through the cour- 
tesy of Major Rich, U. S. Army instructor of the Indiana National 
Guard and the aero station at Kokomo. 



308 Year Book 

delaware county 

A demonstration health conference open to children in Delaware 
County was held at Muncie during the annual Federation of Clubs and 
the State Confercene of Charities and Correction; exhibits were also 
shown at conference headquarters at the Chamber of Commerce. As not 
much was done to organize the outlying townships, a large percentage 
of the children examined lived in Muncie; two centrally located churches 
were available, and the physicians and public health nurse assisted. 
Many visitors saw the work. 

One afternoon was devoted to examination of children at the Dela- 
ware County Children's Home. The director was invited to speak at 
meetings of the Round Table Club, the District Medical Society, the 
Charity Conference, the Kiwanis Club, the Academy of Medicine. A 
fine spirit of co-operation and live newspaper articles were features of 
the campaign. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY 

Staff work in Washington County began October 26th. The Red 
Cross and Tri Kappas, farmer's organizations, medical and dental asso- 
ciations co-operated; great interest was shown in the final conferences 
at Salem. The director left for Indianapolis October 29th, to speak in 
Dr. Emerson's Nutrition Clinic on Monday, thence to proceed to the 
American Child Hygiene Association at New Haven, Conn., as member 
of the Board of Directors. Dr. J. K. Berman completed the conferences 
and began the work in Orange County. 

ORANGE COUNTY 

Miss Matilda Steilberg, county nurse, had charge of organization; 
Dr. Schweitzer returned to the staff November 9th, relieving Dr. Ber- 
man. Numerous letters have been received from Washington and 
Orange Counties expressing appreciation of the work, and several which 
asked further advice in care and feeding of children. 

FLOYD COUNTY 

Dr. Anna McKamey and the W. C. T. U. Society planned the work 
in Floyd. As fall rains had begun, conferences were planned only in 
those places located on improved roads. In New Albany splendid pro- 
grams given by classes in physical education preceded the evening lec- 
'tures. Dr. Hedwig Kuhn was employed as temporary assistant. Some 
examinations of both white and colored children were held at school 
buildings, in addition to baby examinations at the W. C. T. U. head- 
quarters. 

LAKE COUNTY 

Lake County work was divided geographically into three sections: 
The southern, a purely agricultural section ; the central, including Crown 
Point, the county seat, and the northern, the towns that smoke along the 
lake. 



State Board op Health 309 

Because of the busy Christmas season and because of the prevalance 
of infectious diseases in some sections, only two rural towns had health 
conferences. Successful conferences were held in Hammond, East Chi- 
cago, Indiana Harbor, Whiting and Gary. 

At Hammond, Miss Bewsey and Mr. Hestenes of Brooks House, 
planned the work with a vision of the future. All organizations in the 
city assisted and pledged money and equipment for starting a baby 
health station and dental prophylactic station, both of which are accom- 
plishing great good. Whiting has health stations and East Chicago is 
carrying on the work for babies. 

At Gary, medical and social workers' conferences were held at 
Neighborhood House and at Friendship House at luncheons. In addi- 
tion to the evening lectures, moving picture films were shown to 10,000 
school children. Numerous personal conferences were held; many babies 
were examined. The staff was invited to come later to Hammond to 
assist in arousing interest in school health tests. 

Profitable meetings were held at Indiana Harbor and at East Chi- 
cago in co-operation with Miss Deuel. The interest throughout the 
county among physicians, nurses, municipal officers, newspapers, fra- 
ternal organizations, business organizations, groups of citizens, was 
notable. It is hoped to complete county conference work there at a 
more favorable time. Dr. Kuhn was released to attend clinics in Chi- 
cago. Dr. M. May Allen was employed as assistant field director of the 
Child Hygiene Division in February. 

HAMILTON COUNTY 

County-wide child health conferences in 1922 were begun in Ham- 
ilton County in March. Under the leadership of Mrs. Leitzman, a pre- 
liminary meeting of county and township chairmen was held. Dr. 
Schweitzer, Dr. Allen and Miss Gibbs attended this meeting. Com- 
munity interest in the conferences was general; local children furnished 
a part of each evening's program; there were songs, games, drills, read- 
ings, folk and solo dances and orchestra selections; lectures by the staff 
and moving pictures were presented to crowded houses. The final con- 
ferences at Noblesville created general interest. Many children were at 
once placed under medical supervision; habits and diets were revised. 

CARROLL COUNTY 

Two or three months before the date set for the baby health con- 
ferences, the work of organization was begun. Mrs. R. C. Gustavel, 
ably assisted by competent township chairmen, registered the highest 
daily township attendance known up to this time. The county medical 
and dental association and municipal officials gave every assistance; 637 
children were examined. Follow-up work is being planned by organiza- 
tions interested in the conference. 

VIGO COUNTY 

The work in Vigo began with a Better Baby Week in Terre Haute, 
conducted in co-operation with Pure Milk Week. Officials from Purdue 



310 Year Book 

University co-operated with the county agent in the latter campaign 
and the better baby work was done by fifteen volunteer official agencies. 
Baby health conferences were held each day at the Light House Mis- 
sion; talks illustrated by child hygiene pictures were shown in the 
schools; subjects pertaining to baby health and child care were dis- 
cussed and lunches given by the Chamber of Commerce, Child Welfare 
Society and the Parent-Teacher president, at a reception given by the 
League of Women Voters. Each evening a team from the better baby 
and the better milk officials spoke before the Parent-Teacher Associa- 
tions in Terre Haute. Many visitors, including classes from hospitals 
and home economics, saw the work of the child hygiene staff assisted 
by local physicians, dentists and nurses. Children were brought in 
groups in automobiles by Tri Kappas. The child work in Vigo County 
continued the following week with Mrs. Concannon, chairman. As the 
junior staff nurse was temporarily placed on other duty, a nurse from 
the visiting nurse association assisted in her absence. In Vigo, 1,217 
children were examined. The records for follow-up work were left with 
the Visiting Nurse Association. The newspapers gave much space to 
the work, three illustrated feature articles appearing in the Tribune. 

TIPPECANOE COUNTY 

County child health conferences in Tippecanoe County were or- 
ganized under the supervision of Dr. Ada McMahan. Mrs. Bennett 
Taylor, the county chairman, was assisted by Misses Hatfield and Beeler, 
public health nurses. Twelve township conferences were held, including 
a three-day conference at Lafayette. Local physicians and dentists gave 
valuable assistance; transportation for child hygiene nurses was fur- 
nished by local Red Cross. An average of twenty-nine children per day 
came for examination. 

TIPTON COUNTY 

Following the Tippecanoe conferences, Dr. Schweitzer and Miss 
Gibbs began work in Tipton County. The equipment was furnished 
partly by the child hygiene division and partly by the Tipton County 
workers. Miss Claudia Achtenhagen, county Red Cross nurse, re- 
signed, who had acted as chairman, remained with the party two days 
and left Miss Vanderplatte complete the work. As moving picture ma- 
chines were available only at Windfall and Kempton, a baloptican and 
slides were used to illustrate lectures. Miss Gibbs was replaced by Miss 
Hancock. Dr. J. K. Berman assisted three days; an average of twenty- 
eight children per day were examined. Dr. Stanley Cotton, county medi- 
cal secretary, assisted and two medical students acted as clerks. Trans- 
portation was furnished by Tri Kappas and business men. 

JASPER COUNTY 

The regular staff work in Jasper County began June 13th, after an 
efficient advertising campaign had been conducted by Miss Florence 
Ryan, school attendance officer. She and Miss Helen Boyer, R. N., assist- 
ed throughout the county furnishing transportation. Miss Lips, of the 



State Board of Health 311 

child hygiene staff, who was to attend the national nurses meeting in 
Seattle, was replaced by Miss Gibbs. Miss Hancock went from Tipton 
to Jasper County and Dr. Schweitzer met the local physicians several 
weeks before the campaign; she had worked with the staff at Rensselaer. 
Three hundred and eighty-seven children were examined; newspaper 
stories and advertising posters were of unusual excellence; physicians, 
dentists and citizens were interested. 

HOWARD COUNTY 

At a preliminary meeting with the County Medical Society, plans 
under way for organization of the child health conference were dis- 
cussed. Further conference was held with Mrs. Meade White, tuber- 
culosis nurse, who was chairman of the committee. The child hygiene 
staff held health conferences in this county June 28th to July 8th. Ex- 
cellent co-operation by local organizations was a feature of the work. 
Mrs. White furnished transportation and 411 children were examined. 

SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Owing to the excellent preliminary work of Miss Ella Anderson, R. 
N., county nurse, in charge of county organization, great interest was 
manifested throughout the county. Several places had half -day con- 
ferences, permitting a visit to two places in one day. Thirteen con- 
ferences were held with an average of fifty- two to a conference; the 
daily average for ten days was sixty-eight. In addition to local physi- 
cians, Dr. J. K. Berman, assisted July 20th, 21st and 24th, and the 
director July 25th, 26th and 27th. This was the first of a series of four 
counties organized earlier, under the supervision of Miss Lips. 

GREENE COUNTY 

The child hygiene campaign in Greene County began the evening 
of July 28th at Bloomfield. Mrs. Parker, the county chairman, assisted 
throughout the conference. 

MARTIN COUNTY 

The third county, Martin, a mining county, was rugged and the staff 
remained in places worked. The interest in the work was commendable. 

DAVIESS COUNTY 

A more rural county. An open air meeting was held at Odon dur- 
ing the Old Settlers' meeting. In this group of counties the highest num- 
ber of children examined in a single day was 110, at Jasonville in Greene 
County; fifty-seven at Loogootee in Martin County, and forty-one at 
Plainville in Daviess County; Sullivan averaged fifty- two a conference. 
Recent reports show that great interest in the health of children has 
been aroused. 

DEARBORN COUNTY 

This was the first of a series of counties in the fourth district, 
organized earlier under the supervision of Miss Gibbs, R. N., by the 



312 Year Book 

federated clubs. Miss Fanny Foulke, district chairman of the federa- 
tion, was made district chairman of the child health conference work. 
The county chairmen were appointed as follows: Dearborn County, 
Mrs. George Steadman; Ohio County, Mrs. Claudia Johnson, R. N.; 
Switzerland County, Mrs. Cogley Cole; Jefferson County, Mrs. E. J. Scott. 

Third District: Scott County, Miss Matilda Steilberg; Clark 
County, Mrs. Estella Warder. 

Ripley County was postponed because of illness of county nurse, 
Miss Hopkins. 

Bartholomew County was substituted, Chairman, Mrs. Rose Arm- 
strong, R. N. Jennings County was organized, Chairman, Mrs. William 
Grossman. 

Dearborn County was not quite complete at the close of the fiscal 
year and the statistical study will be included in 1923 report. By Sep- 
tember 30th, 277 children had been examined in this county. 

SPECIAL PRENATAL STUDY 

The child hygiene division is probably the first to study the extent 
and kind of prenatal and obstetric care in widely distributed rural and 
small town districts. The histories are taken by the child hygiene staff 
at child health conferences and statistical studies are compiled in the 
office. The studies on obstetric care include histories from mothers at 
the state fair, and in Sullivan, Martin, Greene, Daviess and Dearborn 
counties. The studies in prenatal care have been made during the past 
two years and include practically all types of population. 

PRENATAL REST 

Rest from heavy work during pregnancy of 1,431 mothers was re- 
ported as follows: 

One week or less, 6 per cent of mothers. 

One week to two weeks, 18 ^ per cent of mothers. 

One-fifth of the expectant mothers rested three to four weeks. 

Seven-twentieths did only light work for one to three months before 
childbirth. 

One-tenth did only light work for three to six months before child- 
birth. 

Fewer than 10 per cent did no heavy work during pregnancy. 
Mothers who have had adequate rest prior to childbirth have had fewer 
complications — the babies have been healthier and happier. 

PRENATAL CARE 

In a study of 2,448 mothers there was no prenatal care by physician 
reported in 24.6 per cent or nearly one-fourth of the cases. Fifty-four 
per cent of the mothers had from two to nine months' supervision by a 
physician. 

CARE AT BIRTH OP CHILD 

It is interesting to note that 99 per cent of records show that a 
physician was in attendance at the birth of the child and in 1 per cent 



State Board of Health 313 

of cases a midwife. The prevalence of midwife practice includes only 
small groups from the foreign population. Records in the office of the 
state statistician show limited districts where two out of three births 
have been attended by midwives. 

In addition, one-fifth of the mothers were cared for by a registered 
nurse, over two-fifths had an experienced nurse, and the others had 
members of the family or neighbors in attendance; all cases had special 
care of some kind. 

post-natal rest 

A study of 4,291 mothers shows that one-twentieth rested only one 
week or less from household or other duties after the birth of the babies ; 
over one-fourth rested two weeks and nearly one-half the mothers rested 
from two to five weeks. One-tenth of the total number rested three to 
six months, and the one-twentieth who rested for a longer period also 
report incomplete recovery after childbirth and poor health at present. 

DAYS IN BED, TEN TO FOURTEEN DAYS 

This study includes 4,857 mothers and reveals that 3,386 or 68 per 
cent of this number spent less than two weeks in bed at the time of 
childbirth, while one-fourth were in bed two weeks. The number who 
report a longer period corresponds quite closely again to the number 
who report poor or slow recovery after childbirth. Our statistics show 
that about one-fifth of the slow recoveries eventually regain good health. 
We are happy to note that the high percentage of approximately 4,800 
women report good recovery and good health at the time of the health 
conference. As children up to seven years are usually taken for exam- 
ination, these reports indicate with some degree of accuracy the stand- 
ards of maternal care which prevail in the small towns and the rural 
districts of Indiana. This report does not include deaths of either moth- 
ers or babies. 

A study including 4,820 mothers, reveals that about 5 per cent of 
the mothers report poor recovery, 14 per cent report fair recovery and 
86 per cent good recovery. An average of 4 per cent report poor health 
now, 14 per cent fair health, and 83 per cent good health at present, out 
of a number of 4,792 mothers. 

DURATION OF PREGNANCY 

Of 4,880 pregnancies, 4,689 progressed to full term, leaving 179 pre- 
mature births and twelve which exceeded full term. As 1,159 infant 
deaths due to premature birth are reported for 1921, the survival of 
almost 200 infants is cause for congratulation. 

AGE 

A study of the ages when 4,637 women became mothers, reveals the 
fact that only one-twentieth became mothers under twenty years of 
age, and a smaller proportion were over forty years of age. The thirty 
to forty age periods claim seven-twentieths of the births, the period from 
twenty-five to thirty not quite as many, while in the group from twenty 
to twenty-five years of age about one-fifth of the births occurred. Ap- 



314 Year Book 

proximately seven-tenths of the births occurred at the age period when 
the woman fully matured should be able to bear strong, healthy children. 

RECOVERY AND HEALTH IN 1921-22 

In comparison with the previous years, these records show that a 
slightly higher per cent of mothers received professional prenatal care, 
had correct care at the time of childbirth, and report good recovery and 
good health, at the present time. 

SLEEP STUDY ON 7,174 CHILDREN 
The importance of sleep in maintaining and restoring health has 
not been fully recognized. Sleep is of the greatest value in childhood 
when energy must be renewed for both activity and growth. 

AMOUNT OF SLEEP 

While the majority of children sleep as much as needful, yet at the 
ages when sleep is most needed, many children sleep too little. 

In a study by ages, of the habits of sleep of 7,174 children who 
were examined, by the child hygiene division, we find one-half the boys, 
and 47.29 per cent of girls up to one year of age, sleep too little. Forty 
per cent of boys and 38.65 per cent of girls from one to four years of 
age sleep too little. More than 25 per cent of boys (or one-fourth) 
and 26.46 per cent of girls from five to nine years of age, and 15.84 per 
cent of boys and 13.52 per cent of girls from ten to sixteen years fail to 
get the correct amount of sleep. 

In these children the repair of the body does not quite keep pace 
with tissue wastes. As a consequence the child may be always slightly 
toxic, irritable, lack appetite and either become flabby in body and mind, 
or use up all his surplus energy early in life only to find himself physi- 
cally bankrupt at an age when he should be in the prime of life. 

SLEEP ALONE 

Up to the age of five years 56 per cent or more than one-half the 
babies sleep alone. It is desirable that all growing babies sleep alone; 
they need undisturbed rest. Many babies have been accidentally smoth- 
ered while sleeping with adults. Breast-fed babies who sleep with their 
mothers are likely to nurse too frequently and if restless, neither mother 
nor baby get enough sleep. If a mother is overworked, loses sleep and 
as a consequence worries, her milk may not agree with the baby. The 
baby becomes daily more irritable and restless and the mother's rest and 
peace of mind more disturbed. Thus a vicious circle is established 
which finally results in weaning the baby. His growth may be retarded 
over a period of several months, he may never fully recover and may 
go through life never quite well, never wholly efficient. 

FRESH AIR AND SUNSHINE 

The value of fresh air and sunshine are being appreciated as never 
before — both are growth stimulants and theraueptic agents. The high- 
est percentage of children who sleep with open windows, 94 per cent 
are those from six months to four years of age. Under six months we 
find only 89 per cent and at five to six years 87 per cent. The group 
from seven to sixteen years has the lowest average, only 77 per cent 



State Board of Health 315 

sleeping with open windows, this in spite of the very general teaching 
in schools of the health crusade and the rules of the health game. Fewer 
than 4.02 per cent of children of all ages sleep in open air. Occasionally 
parents decry ''such foolishness" and insist on saving fuel. Children 
are sewed up in clothing and sealed up in dingy houses during the long 
winter and are turned out in fresh air only when the weather is warm. 
Pasty skins, lack-lustre eyes, flabby muscles and poor digestion and 
assimilation, poor resistance to "colds" and other infections result. 

In a school where the observance of health crusade rules was above 
90 per cent, every child had a clear skin, rosy cheeks, bright eyes and 
an elastic step. As one of the little girls expressed it, "The best thing 
about the health crusade is the good health we have gained." Fresh air, 
sunshine and long hours of sleep promote good health. 

STUDY ON MENTAL TESTS GIVEN BY DIVISION OF INFANT 
AND CHILD HYGIENE 

Our tests concerned with the child's development have been criti- 
cized as being too difficult. A study of 3,837 tests given by the child 
hygiene staff shows an average of 62.5 per cent of all ages of pre-school 
children who respond to tests for age and 34.9 per cent who responded 
to tests above those for their age, making a total of 97.4 per cent of the 
children examined who were equal to or above the average mentality 
for age. 

No allowance was made in this study for children who are stubborn 
or abnormally shy. No allowance was made for changes in personnel 
of staff, yet the averages are quite representative of the types and ages 
of children who were brought to the health conferences. Not quite 2 per 
cent scored below age standards. 

A comparison of boys and girls shows practically the same average 
mentality or reaction to surroundings. At six months the average is 
slightly in favor of the girl babies, but the boy babies are slightly 
superior at one year. Boys are slightly better at eighteen months, girls 
at twenty-four months, boys at thirty-six to sixty months. On the other 
hand more boys than girls are six to twelve months below standard for 
ages. 

These tests serve a double purpose. They enable us to check up on 
perception, co-ordination, imitation, memory, inventiveness, etc. They 
also interest the child and help to keep him happy throughout the exam- 
ination. It is our purpose to make each child feel that the examination 
is a desirable thing and that it should be both agreeable and helpful. 
At some future time his confidence in a physician may save his life. 

FEEDING AND NUTRITION 

Based on examinations of 2,385 girls and 2,284 boys, total 4,469. 
Tables used by U. S. Children's Bureau and Indiana Child Hygiene Di- 
vision. 

A study of the weight of each child as compared with his height 
shows a majority of the children slightly above or below the average 
weight. These variations depend on racial characteristics and heredity 
and are of interest as such. More pronounced variations may be due to 
parental deficiencies of some kind, to incorrect feeding or habits, or to 



316 Year Book 

environment, etc., and should be studied as to causes. A marked varia- 
tion of 10 per cent below average weight for height may be due to illness 
and should have medical supervision for a time. 

Children markedly over weight have been given little attention. A 
number of those examined, however, had begun early to take food too 
frequently and in larger amount than was needed. This habit of over- 
eating is fostered by indulgence of parents. Certain types of food 
usually those responsible for fat production are preferred by the child. 
The excretory organs are over-worked. These children are often un- 
stable in many ways. A physician usually finds that any attempt to 
change the child's habits is opposed by parents who refuse to co-operate. 
Parents in their selfish desire to give the child everything he wants 
often willfully ignore the actual physical and moral damage to the child. 

The number of children who are 10 per cent or more below the aver- 
age weight for height varies with the age period, but the condition when 
found should be remedied if possible. Such children are classified as 
poorly nourished. The average percentage of poorly nourished children 
examined in 1921-22 was 10.97 per cent. 

Among breast-fed babies the average percentage of poorly nourished 
was 13 per cent as compared with 17 per cent in 1921. The percentage 
of under-nourished girls was slightly in excess of the percentage of 
boys. 

Of the babies fed on cow's milk, eighteen in every hundred boys and 
twelve in every hundred girls were markedly under weight, an average 
of 15 per cent. 

Early feeding on condensed milk shows a higher percentage of 
underweights; an average of twenty-two in each hundred, the propor- 
tion being twenty-eight boys to seventeen girls. 

Older, rapidly growing children on a diet of milk, eggs and cereal 
or those on "table food" are not so seriously under weight, but more 
than half are below the average. 

The highest percentage of those below average weight is found 
among babies with whom breast milk has not seemed to agree and who 
consequently have been weaned and have tried several mixtures before 
finding one that could be assimilated. Many times this difficulty might 
have been avoided by correct attention to the mother during the prenatal 
period and by regularity and greater persistence in establishing and 
maintaining the milk supply. 

Two reasons for weaning are usually given: There was not enough 
milk, and the milk did not agree with the baby. The fault may have 
been irregular, or too frequent feeding, some milk left in the breast 
after nursing (should be milked dry each time), shock, overwork or worry 
on the part of the mother, sickness of mother. 

With proper care 95 per cent of mothers should nurse their babies. 
In Indiana we have found 70 per cent who do nurse their babies. 

Of the babies who are breast-fed, almost 50 per cent or one-half are 
weaned by the seventh month and all but about 10 per cent are weaned 
by the end of the first year. In a few cases the weaning is deferred to 
twenty-four or thirty-six months. This is usually not best for either 
mother or child and may be avoided if preparation for weaning is begun 



State Board op Health 317 

at seventh month by the gradual introduction of cow's milk, well cooked 
cereals and plain vegetable soups into the child's menu, first as com- 
plementary feedings and later as substitute feedings. The number of 
feedings should not be increased. 

The period of mixed breast and bottle feeding is likely to be some- 
what more prolonged than exclusive breast feeding. Cereal is intro- 
duced in over half the cases in the 10 to 16 month period. At 16 months 
to three years cereals, fruits, toast and milk are generally used. Fam- 
ilies generally do not give children sufficient variety of fresh, leafy 
vegetables. General diet is common after 24 months to four years. 

STUDY OF THE FAMILY ON THE BASIS OF OFFSPRING 

On each child health record card used by the Child Hygiene Staff, 
the following data is obtained: concerning the children living or dead, 
the total number of living births, the number of stillbirths and mis- 
carriages; which children born alive have since died, and the number of 
mother deaths, and number of living children. 

The following percentages are based on the total number of preg- 
nancies : 

Thirty-one per cent of the families were one-child families. While 
this may be partly accounted for by the fact that many of the babies 
examined were first babies, ages one year and under, yet the fact re- 
mains, that the number of one-child families is comparatively high. 

Twenty-five per cent of the families were two-child families and 
eighteen per cent ^ere three-child families. In fewer than ten per 
cent of the families had four pregnancies occurred, although a four- 
child family is biologically and socially considered an ideal family. 
About two per cent of the mothers reported nine pregnancies or more. 

A study of the total number of children examined in this group 
shows that nineteen per cent, the highest percentage in any one group, 
came from the three-child families, while sixty per cent came from 
families having fewer than five children, and only eight per cent came 
from families having nine children or more. 

CHILD MORTALITY 

Among children from the two-child families, the deaths averaged 
two to one hundred, while among children in the three-child families 
the loss was six in each one hundred children, or three times as many. 
Among children from families having six, seven or eight children, the 
loss was eight children in each one hundred. In the larger families 
the relative loss was again slightly lower, or six in each one hundred 
children. 

ACCIDENTS OF PREGNANCY 

A study of the accidents of pregnancy in 3,512 families shows the 
loss of prospective life by reason of stillbirths and miscarriages. 

The average number of stillbirths was two to each one hundred 
pregnancies. The average number of miscarriages is still higher, being 
one in nine pregnancies. 

When we consider that these statistics are compiled from records 
of the average middle-class family and are based on a total of 9,985 



318 Year Book 

pregnancies, the loss of life is somewhat appalling, the total stillbirths 
approximating 208 and total miscarriages 865. 

The loss in the health and happiness of the mother and the family 
can not be estimated. The percentage of mother deaths in this group 
was unusually low, one in 1,250, the highest percentage occurring in 
the one-child families, which again partly accounts for the small size 
of these families. 

It is the hope of the child health workers everywhere to prevent 
much of this loss by — 

(a) Teaching the mother how to care for her own health. 

(b) Urging one hundred per cent medical supervision throughout 
pregnancy. 

(c) Impressing families and municipalities with the necessity for 
freedom from over-work, worry and excitement during pregnancy, and 
with the importance of correct prenatal, obstetric and post-natal care 
as life-saving agencies. 

This life-saving service cannot be successfully accomplished by any 
one group. All agencies must work together if the hazards of mother- 
hood and infancy are to be eliminated. 

DISEASES OF CHILDHOOD 

During the six months ending September 30, 1922, a study of 3,873 
children examined, shows the age prevalence of infectious diseases. 
There were 1,916 boys and 1,957 girls. By the time they reach school 
age only 3.54% of the boys and 2.84% of the girls had escaped without 
an attack of infectious diseases. In infancy, nursing babies are im- 
mune to many infections and also have fewer opportunities for infec- 
tion. Up to one year 73.85% of all these children had escaped without 
any infectious disease. 

It will readily be seen that the waste of life and health due to 
these diseases begins early, and rapidly increases as the child is able 
to run about by himself and come into contact with carriers of infec- 
tion. Many of these diseases begin as affections of the nose and throat. 
If we could begin in infancy to keep these babies free from infections 
of the naso-pharynx we could eliminate a large number of cases by 
never giving them a chance to develop. If every child who shows symp- 
toms of a "cold" were at once isolated, the 25 or 30 other children who 
might have "caught" it from him would not get it. 

The total number of cases of infectious diseases occurring in this 
group was 6,062, an average of not quite two to a child. We must 
remember, too, that these statistics are compiled from records of living 
children, that those who did not survive are not considered in this 
study. 

In each one hundred cases of illness — 
18 were due to whooping cough. 
15 were due to frequent colds. 
11.9 were due to measles. 
11.5 were due to influenza. 
9.7 were due to chicken-pox. 
6.5 were due to sore throat. 



State Board of Health 



319 



4.5 were due to pneumonia. 
3.9 were due to mumps. 
2.9 were due to scarlet fever. 
2.8 were due to bronchitis. 
1.7 were due to wrong feeding. 
1 was due to diphtheria. 
.37 was due to typhoid. 
.31 was due to infantile paralysis. 
10 were due to other diseases. 
We find as a result of these early infections 60% of the children 
having tonsils which need either treatment or removal, and about one 
in ten who should have adenoids removed. Mouth defects, including bad 
teeth, average more than one to a child. Fourteen per cent have bone 
and posture defects, more than 7% have notable heart irregularities and 
nearly one-half have lung affections, which if not looked after may later 
result seriously. These figures show that acute infectious diseases of 
childhood are not "over with" when the child apparently recovers. They 
are more often the beginning of a long train of disorders from which 
he may never fully recover. 

SUMMARY 



First 
Quarter 



Second 
Quarter 



Third 
Quarter 



Fourth 
Quarter 



Total 



States visited 

Countries visited 

Towns visited 

Number children examined 

Talks given by director 

Talks given by assistant field director 

Talks given by assistant field physician 

Talks and demonstrations given by nurses. . . 

Talks by local doctors 

Audiences 

Conference of director with officials, etc 

Special conference luncheons 

Meetings attended 

Clinics attended 

Demonstration examinations and tests 

Exhibits shown 

Films' shown times 

Lantern slides shown times 

Special charts made 

Aeroplane trips made 

Local programs furnished 

Day nurseries and rest tents conducted 

Babies checked 

Mothers and children cared for at rest tents . 

Helpers at rest tents 

Doctors and dentists assisting in conferences . 

Nurses assisting in conferences 

Local women assisting 

Organizations assisting 

Exhibit material loaned 

Pamphlets loaned 

Charts and posters loaned (sets) 

Films loaned 

Slides loaned (sets) 

Pictures loaned 

Days examination of children 

Moving picture film made 

School examination cards made 

Pre-school examination cards made 

Parent cards made 

To mothers folder made 

Form letters sent out. . , 

Literature distributed 



1,754 
61 



10 
22,166 



125 

2 

10 

94 

128 



101 
57 

178 
15 



1 
8 

21 
1,577 

31 
5 



50 
'4J636' 



120 
2 



23 

ib'Mo 



271 
18,153 



342 
6,244 



3,125 
34 



627 
10 
170 



97 
87 
467 
20 
1 
4 



10,000 
10,000 
70,000 
412 
27,588 



26 
73 

2,845 

28 

37 

1 

21 



32,735 

337 

5 

179 



5 

7 

,378 

480 

22 

43 

36 

342 



12 



507 
38,776 



11 
82 

220 

9,301 

154 

82 

14 

122 

10 

67,003 

1,629 

25 

531 

- 10 

10 

279 

327 

13 

11 

2 

71 

9 

1,384 

480 

22 

259 

181 

1,107 

43 

7 

23 

32 

2 

3 

20 
238 

10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
70,000 
1,532 
90,761 



320 



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332 Year Book 

REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

INA M. GASKILL, R. N., Director. 

The Division of Public Health Nursing was established in the Indi- 
ana State Board of Health in May, 1920. From that date until Feb- 
ruary, 1921, the American Red Cross met the entire expense. A new 
agreement regarding the division was reached between the State Board 
of Health, the American Red Cross and the Indiana Tuberculosis Asso- 
ciation on February 1, 1921. The latter association was to share jointly 
with the American Red Cross in financing the work of the supervising 
nurse, while the assistant was to be financed entirely by the American 
Red Cross. The purpose of this arrangement was further to co-ordinate 
public health nursing work in the state and to develop it within the 
State Board of Health. Both the American Red Cross and the Indiana 
Tuberculosis Association were to bear the expense for this work only 
until the State Board of Health should be able to assume all or part of 
it. 

The State Board of Health began to provide the salary for the 
stenographer in September, 1921, and in January, 1922, began to pay the 
traveling expenses of the director, Miss Ina M. Gaskill. 

Later the Division of Infant and Child Hygiene was reorganized to 
include the Division of Public Health Nursing, and on July 1, 1922, the 
State Board of Health assumed the responsibility for the salary and 
traveling expenses of the director. The expense for the assistant direc- 
tor, Miss Annabelle Petersen, still was paid by the American Red Cross. 

Miss Mary J. Horn, a nurse with experience overseas in the world 
war, began work with this division as second assiistant to the director 
on August 21, 1922. Her appointment was necessary on account of the 
increased activities of the division. Miss Horn is a graduate of the 
University of Chicago and of St. Luke's Hospital Training School for 
Nurses, at Chicago, and had a course in public health nursing at Colum- 
bia University, New York City. For the past two years Miss Horn has 
been superintendent of the Visiting Nurse Association of South Bend. 
She will give her entire time to promoting, supervising, and organizing, 
particularly the maternity and infant hygiene phases of public health 
nursing. 

PURPOSE 

The purpose of this division is to stimulate interest in the work of 
public health nursing, to organize and standardize such work through- 
out the state, to serve as a clearing house of information, to interest 
nurses in this type of service, and to supervise the work of nurses in 
the field. 

Since public health nursing work is so well advanced in several of 
the largest cities of the state, the greater part of the time of the divi- 
sion has been given to county or rural work. We know that very splen- 
did results may be obtained by devoting time to organization and super- 
vision of town and city services, and with the present force, the division 
can give more attention to this work. 



State Board of Health 333 

Since the establishment of this division, rural public health nursing 
has spread from six to fifty-six counties. City services have grown and 
developed almost as rapidly. 

Types of public health nursing in which nurses may engage are as 
follows : 

Bedside Nursing, which consists of care given to the sick in their 
own homes. Such care is given to both sexes, all ages, all nationalities 
and in all varieties of illness, except contagious diseases. It is arranged 
on the visit basis, the nurse calling at the home to give the care daily 
or as often as needed, but not remaining, except in emergencies. 

Prenatal Nursing, which includes supervision of the physical con- 
dition of expectant mothers and instruction in the hygiene of pregnancy, 
advice regarding injurious social environment, arrangements for care 
during confinement and the development of prenatal clinics. 

Maternity Nursing. There is great need of adequate nursing care 
of maternity cases, but the visiting nurse is usually able to give such 
care only after confinement, as attendance at deliveries interferes seri- 
ously with the execution of her regular duties. If, however, her regular 
work will permit her to be in attendance during the confinement, and 
yet to obtain necessary rest, these cases by all means should be under- 
taken. 

Infant Welfare, which includes advice to mothers in infant hygiene; 
constant attention to the health of babies; development of infant wel- 
fare clinics and mothers' classes and investigation of local conditions 
influencing infant morbidity and mortality. 

Child Welfare, which is the extension of the infant welfare pro- 
gram to include children of pre-school age. 

School Nursing, which consists of assisting the school physician in 
the physical examination of school children; visiting the children's par- 
ents to obtain their co-operation in remedying defects; the obtaining of 
correction of physical defects through private physicians, clinics or hos- 
pital care; investigating the sanitary conditions of school buildings, and 
developing classes in hygiene among boys and girls. 

Tuberculosis Work, which consists in seeking out undiscovered cases 
of tuberculosis; giving nursing care when needed; securing medical and 
hospital care; teaching the family preventive measures; securing medi- 
cal examination for the family and others exposed to infection; carrying 
on of an eduactional campaign; and stimulating the use of open air 
school rooms. 

Communicable Disease Control and Sanitation, which consists in 
assisting health authorities to discover the presence of communicable 
diseases and to declare and maintain quarantine; in instructing the fam- 
ily in methods of isolation and prophylaxis and in the care of the pa- 
tient; in assisting with vaccinations, giving of antitoxins and serums, 
and the taking f cultures. 



334 



Year Book 



Not all of these activities can be conducted by a nurse working- 
alone, unless her territory is limited. Some of the nurses are engaged 
in small towns where they can develop a many-sided, fairly adequate 
service. Many of them, however, are county nurses covering a compara- 
tively large area, including the open country and many towns, and are 
consequently able to undertake only one or two branches of public health 
nursing. Only as the county service develops and more nurses are em- 
ployed does it become possible to extend the scope of the work. 

The following cities and towns have public health nurses, some 
employed by private organizations, some by boards of health and some 
by boards of education: 



Bedford 

Bloomington 

Connersville 

Crawfordsville 

Clinton 

Evansville 

Elwood 

East Chicago 

Elkhart 

Frankfort 



Fort Wayne 

Gary 

Gas City 

Goshen 

Green sburg 

Hammond 

Huntington 

Indianapolis 

Jeffersonville 

Kendallville 



Kokomo 

Lafayette 

Laporte 

Logansport 

Ligonier 

Linton 

Muncie 

Michigan City 

New Albany 



North Manchester 
Richmond 
Rushville 
Shelbyville 
South Bend 
Terre Haute 
Wabash 
Washington 

Whiting- 



Many other cities are being covered by the county public health 
nurses. 

The following counties have been operating or have established pub- 
lic health nursing services during the year: 



Allen 


Franklin 




Lagrange 


Rush 


Benton 


Fulton 




Morgan 


Ripley 


Boone 


Greene 




Marion 


Steuben 


Blackford 


Gibson 




Marshall 


Scott 


Bartholomew 


Henry 




Martin 


St. Joseph 


Cass 


Hendricks 




Miami 


Sullivan 


Carroll 


Hancock 




Newton 


Tipton 


Clinton 


Jackson 




Noble 


Tippecanoe 


Dekalb 


Johnson 




Ohio 


Vermillion 


Dubois 


Jasper 




Orange 


Wabash 


Dearborn 


Jefferson 




Owen 


Wayne 


Elkhart 


Kosciusko 




Putnam 


Wells 


Floyd 


Lake 




Porter 


White 


Fountain 


Laporte 




Randolph 


Whitley 


Service was discontinued in the 


following counties 




Clark 


Huntington 




Franklin 


Orange 


Clay 


Greene 




Newton 





Classes among women and girls in Elementary Hygiene and Home 
Care of the Sick as arranged by the American Red Cross have been 
given in the following cities and counties: 





Counties 




Cities 


Blackford 


Franklin 


Tipton 


Huntington 


Carroll 


Henry 


Tippecanoe 


Indianapolis 


Clinton 


Johnson 


Wabash 


Kendallville 


Dekalb 


Jackson 


White 


Richmond 


Dearborn 


Marion 


Whitley 




Elkhart 


Noble 







State Board of Health 335 

Public health nurses instituted or assisted in promoting the modern 
health crusade under the auspices of the Indiana Tuberculosis Associa- 
tion, in schools in the following counties and cities: 

Counties Cities 

Blackford Fulton Jasper Crawfordsville 

Clinton Gibson Johnson Gas City 

Dekalb Hancock Putnam Muncie 

Fountain Howard Rush 

NUMBER OF NUESES EMPLOYED (SEPTEMBER 30, 1922) 

Public health nurses now employed in the state 242 

Number employed outside the five largest cities 116 

Number in towns of 8,000 or less than 20,000 24 

Number doing- rural or small town work 76 

Of the large city public health nursing services, fifty-eight are pro- 
vided from public funds and seventy-four from funds of private organ- 
izations or industries. 

Of the rural or small town public health nursing services, thirty- 
three are provided entirely or partly from public funds, thirty-three by 
local Red Cross chapters, fifteen by local tuberculosis associations and 
ten by the two latter groups jointly. Twenty-two are employed by other 
private organizations. 

A summary of the work done by public health nurses in the state 
follows : 

RURAL SERVICES 
Visits Made- 
Bedside nursing 13,829 

Prenatal nursing 772 

Infant welfare nursing , 4,338 

School nursing 18,319 

Tuberculosis nursing % 2,160 

Sanitary inspections 1,368 

Miscellaneous 12,962 

Total visits made 53,748 

Number of school children inspected 146,332 

Nurse attendance at infant welfare stations 426 

Nurse attendance at tuberculosis clinics 142 

Nurse attendance at other clinics , 192 

Clubs and classes 1,257 

Talks given 4,484 

Social service visits 1,758 

CITY SERVICES 

Visits Made — 

Bedside nursing 111,672 

Maternity nursing 6,476 

Attendance at deliveries 266 

Prenatal nursing 18,134 

Infant welfare nursing 39,223 

School nursing 59,052 

Tuberculosis nursing 20,421 

Sanitary inspections 93? 

Miscellaneous 6,343 

Total visits made 262,522 

Number of school children inspected 211,591 

Nurse attendance at infant welfare stations 620 

Nurse attendance at tuberculosis clinics 169 



836 Year Book 

Nurse attendance at other clinics 139 

Clubs and classes 498 

Talks given 1,314 

Social service visits 157 

It has not been possible to include in this statistical report various 
activities in which the nurses have been engaged. In fairness to the 
nurses it should be said that in many communities the biggest thing ac- 
complished can not be set down in mere figures. The fruitage of public 
health work often extends over a period of years and can not be esti- 
mated in any annual survey. 

PROGRAMS ON PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

With the co-operation of the district organizations of the Indiana 
State Nurses Association, special programs on public health nursing 
were arranged for one meeting of each of the district associations. In 
this way public health nursing was brought before the graduate nurses 
of the districts and without doubt was the means of interesting many 
nurses in this line of work. 

DISTRICT MEETINGS OP PUBLIC HEALTH NURSES 

Two district conferences of public health nurses were held under the 
direction of this division. The first was in Lafayette, January 7, and 
the second in Fort Wayne, March 25. Twenty-five public health nurses 
attended the Lafayette conference and thirty-six nurses from north- 
eastern Indiana attended the meeting at Fort Wayne. In each instance 
a full day was devoted to the discussion of problems pertaining to pub- 
lic health nursing. 

THIRD ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF PUBLIC HEALTH NURSES 

The third annual conference of public health nurses of the state is 
arranged for and is to be held under the direction of this division in 
Indianapolis at the Hotel Lincoln, October 5, 6 and 7, immediately fol- 
lowing the convention of the State Nurses Association. This meeting is 
the one time during the year when all public health nurses come to- 
gether in informal conference and are given an opportunity to listen to 
discussions and to discuss problems pertaining to their work. Speakers 
of national and state repute have been secured and special demonstra- 
tions of prenatal, infant welfare and school nursing are to be given. 
Miss Edna Foley of the Visiting Nurse Association of Chicago; Dr. 
Rachelle Yarros, United States Public Health Service; Miss I. Malinde 
Havey of the Red Cross Nursing Service, Washington, D. C; Mrs. C. C. 
Warrington, State Probation Officer; Dr. Jas. H. Stygall of the Indiana 
Tuberculosis Association; Dr. Wm. F. King and Dr. Ada Schweitzer of 
the State Board of Health, are among the speakers on the program. 
On Saturday the nurses are to make an excursion to the offices of the 
different divisions of the State Board of Health. Approximately 200 
nurses are expected to attend the conference. 

PAMPHLET, "INFORMATION CONCERNING PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

SERVICES" 

A special pamphlet entitled, "Information Concerning Public Health 
Nursing Services," was prepared by the director of this division. This 



State Board of Health 337 

pamphlet contains eight pages of printed matter with illustrations. It 
gives in detail information regarding the organization of public health 
nursing services, including the conditions of employment, types of work 
a nurse may do, qualifications of nurses, cost of service, etc. This 
pamphlet has been sent out to local groups and town and county officials 
over the state and has been found to be valuable. 

STATE RECORDS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH NURSES 

The system of records to be used by public health nurses which 
were prepared and introduced by this division last year have been well 
received and have been used by many public health nurses and organiza- 
tions over the state, the county buying the record. In January an addi- * 
tional record pertaining to the inspection of buildings and grounds was 
distributed to all public health nurses who were working in rural or 
small town schools. One side of this record gives in detail a report of 
buildings and grounds and the other side a record of the physical handi- 
caps of the children. One of these cards is left with the teacher or 
school official and a copy containing information regarding buildings and 
grounds is sent to the State Board of Health. When the nurse makes 
another visit she again marks the card to show any improvement in con- 
ditions. A similar record has been used by other states and has proven 
valuable in securing better sanitary conditions in rural schools. 

INDIANA HEALTH EXPOSITION 

At the Indiana Health Exposition, May 19 to 27, public health 
nurses were very much in evidence, and were on duty in a majority of 
the booths. It is evident that the public health nurse is an integral part 
of almost every phase of public health work. 

Several hundred nurses in uniform attended the unveiling of the 
statue of Hygiea the first day of the exposition and took part in the 
ceremony. One group wore the Red Cross uniform and were led by Miss 
Petersen. 

This division had prepared a special exhibit which was to demon- 
strate the work done by public health nurses. One scene displayed in 
miniature the visit of a public health nurse to a rural home. Real 
grass, hedge and trees were growing in the yard and live gold fish were 
swimming in the pool. A card pointed out the fact that "Public health 
nursing services are in operation in fifty-three Indiana counties." 

A second scene was a miniature school room with children seated 
at their desks and the public health nurse, in uniform, weighing the chil- 
dren. The "Rules of the Health Game" were written on the blackboard. 
A card stated that "99,640 Indiana school children received individual 
attention from public health nurses in 1921, and 40,914 school nursing 
visits were made." The third scene portrayed a visit of a nurse to a 
maternity case. It included a completely furnished room, with a patient 
in bed and a baby in a basket. In addition to this exhibit, charts and 
pictures were shown and literature pertaining to public health nursing 
was provided upon request. Large numbers of adults and children vis- 
ited the exhibit daily. 

22—22978 



338 Year Book 

dental survey 

A special survey was planned and accomplished by this division in 
co-operation with the State Department of Public Instruction and the 
Indiana State Dental Association. The purpose of the survey was to 
stimulate interest in better dental hygiene among school children and 
to obtain figures regarding dental conditions. The Dental Association 
provided a special simple record card and rural public health nurses and 
local dentists made the survey. The month of November was desig- 
nated as the time in which this work should be done. During this time 
22,863 children were inspected. It was found that only 38 per cent of 
the boys and 58 per cent of the girls used a tooth brush. Of the whole 
number, 5,924 girls and 7,266 boys had broken down teeth, and a total 
of 16,848 had decayed permanent teeth. It was shown by the figures 
that children having bad occlusion have more decayed teeth than chil- 
dren who have good occlusion; and that children who have clean mouths 
and clean teeth are less liable to dental defects. The survey was the 
means of creating greater interest in oral hygiene and dental care in 
many of the communities, and especially among the boys and girls in 
school. 

FIRST FULL TIME HEALTH UNIT 

Miss Fannie Thomas, the public health nurse employed by the Red 
Cross Chapter and Tuberculosis Association of Fulton County, became a 
part of the first full time health unit of the state. This unit was or- 
ganized and began operation in Fulton County in May, 1922. The two 
local organizations are still paying Miss Thomas's salary and provide 
her transportation. Through the action of these organizations which 
employ the public health nurse, the establishment of the health unit in 
the county was greatly aided. 

STUDENT NURSE RECRUITING MOVEMENT 

Miss Annabelle Petersen, assistant director of this division, gave con- 
siderable time to a student nurse recruiting movement, during the first 
three months of 1922, serving as chairman of the movement, by the ap- 
pointment of the President of the State Nurses Association. 

The plan of organization as outlined by the American Nurses Asso- 
ciation, the American Eed Cross and the National Organization for 
Public Health Nursing was followed in developing this work. Each 
district of the State Association had its chairman, who was definitely 
responsible for the campaign in her territory. An intensive campaign 
to recruit young women as students of schools of nursing was carried on. 

It was decided that in order to do effective work, it would be neces- 
sary to employ a state speaker for at least three months' work. The 
hospitals conducting schools of nursing were asked to contribute one 
dollar per student to a speaker's fund. With a generous response from 
the hospitals came a donation from the State Nurses Association of five 
hundred dollars and several hundred dollars from the Red Cross chap- 
ters. Each of the four districts of the State Nurses Association and 
the Indianapolis Rotary Club contributed. The American Red Cross 



State Board of Health 339 

provided several thousand pamphlets and posters for distribution, and 
furnished all postage used during- the campaign. The State Board of 
Health provided stenographic help. Many individuals gave freely of 
their time to make this campaign a success. 

Miss Mary E. Gladwin, of Akron, Ohio, well known among nurses, 
was employed as the speaker. During January, February, and March, 
she addressed two hundred groups with a total attendance of 30,294 
people. This number included sixteen colleges with 3,324 students, and 
120 high schools with 20,000 students. Other groups addressed were 
teachers' institutes, women's clubs,, medical societies, business men's clubs, 
student and graduate nurses, and Sunday schools. 

The results of the campaign were gratifying. The supply of nurses 
was greatly increased; in fact, the so-called shortage has almost passed. 

SPECIAL MEETINGS AND INSTITUTES ATTENDED 

The director and Miss Petersen attended an institute on school 
nursing in Cleveland, Ohio, for one week. The institute was held under 
the direction of Miss Anna Stanley, a noted authority on school nursing. 

The director attended an institute on the subject of nutrition which 
was held in Indianapolis, with Dr. Wm. R. P. Emerson, the nutrition 
expert, in charge. 

The director attended the convention of the American Nurses Asso- 
ciation in Seattle, Washington, June 26 to July 1. In connection with 
this meeting, the National Organization for Public Health Nursing had 
arranged an entire week's program of lectures, papers, conferences, 
round table discussions and demonstrations of public health nursing. 
Nurses and health experts of national reputation took part in the pro- 
gram. A special conference for state supervisors of public health 
nursing was held. The director took part in this program. Approxi- 
mately 3,600 nurses attended the convention. 

Aside from the specific activities mentioned above, the director and 
her assistant have accomplished the following routine duties during the 
year: 

Supervisory visits made to county public health nursing- services 68 

Supervisory visits made to city public health nursing- services 32 

Talks to groups of nurses 17 

Talks to other groups , 20 

Talks to local organizations and committees •- • • •, 60 

Conferences and meetings attended 31 

No special effort has been made by the division to tabulate a large 
number of activities, but our goal has been "results". It is very grati- 
fying to know that the service has doubled itself several times within 
the last three years. On September 30, 1921, there were 161 public 
health nurses in the field. A year later the number had increased to 
242. The standard of work compared most favorably with that of other 
states. 

SUPPLY OF PUBLIC HEALTH NURSES 

For the last three years the demand for public health nurses has 
been so great that there has never been, at any time, a sufficient num- 



340 Year Book $ 

ber of nurses available to fill the positions. As a general thing, this 
division has from twenty to thirty unfilled requests. for nurses on hand 
at all times. For this reason the various conferences and programs on 
public health have been presented and the matter urged before nurses 
and other groups. This year closes with only a few unfilled positions 
and a supply of nurses to meet the demand. 

STATUS OF PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

The General Assembly in 1921 passed a law permitting cities other 
than those of the first and fifth classes to appropriate funds to incor- 
porate public health nursing associations "operating not for profit and 
solely for the promotion of public health." This is the only definite law 
pertaining to public health nursing which the state has at this time. 

In many places public health nursing associations are organized and 
incorporated under the laws of the state. Various types of local women's 
clubs are employing public health nurses for generalized or specialized 
work. The results have been gratifying. 

Both county and city boards of education may employ a graduate 
nurse as a supervisor of health and hygiene if she meets the educational 
requirements. In some instances county commissioners are making spe- 
cial appropriations for health work and employing public health nurses 
to do this work. 

Local Red Cross chapters may be authorized, upon application to 
the National Red Cross, to use chapter funds for the establishment of 
a public health nursing service. Under certain conditions a local Red 
Cross chapter may join with another group to support a public health 
nurse. 

Local tuberculosis associations are also authorized to use their 
funds for the organization and support of public health nursing work. 
Under certain conditions a local tuberculosis association may join with 
another group to support a public health nurse. 

It has been the purpose of private organizations to develop and 
finance nursing services only until such time as governmental agencies 
shall take over the direction and support of such services. 

OUTLOOK 

The outlook for the development of public health nursing in the 
state has never been so favorable as it is at the present time. Work 
is being carried on in a greater number of counties and towns. City 
organizations are strengthening their services and endeavoring to raise 
the standard of their work. A great deal of attention is being given 
to the development of prenatal and infant welfare work. Health cen- 
ters are being organized in various places, to provide health informa- 
tion and special demonstrations for mothers and expectant mothers. 

NEEDED LEGISLATION 

It is highly important that the next legislature give us a definite 
law pertaining to the employment of public health nurses. 

There is a demand for a law permitting county and city boards of 
education to employ nurses as school nurses, rather than as teachers 



State Board of Health 341 

of hygiene. There is a demand for a law permitting counties, cities, or 
towns to employ a public health nurse. 

If work administered by this division is to continue and be de- 
veloped in the most effective manner, legislative action, creating a divi- 
sion or department of public health nursing with sufficient appropri- 
ations for the work, will be necessary. 






342 



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348 Year Book 

REPORT OF THE TUBERCULOSIS DIVISION 

STAFF 

DR. H. W. McKANE, Director. 

MISS F. A. DUTCHER, Public Health Nurse. 

RAYMOND BRIGHT, Manager Exhibits. 

The purpose of the Tuberculosis Division is to teach the doctrine 
of prevention, warning the people to protect their children from infec- 
tion, in as much as the infection of tuberculosis is practically acquired 
in childhood. It is generally believed that eight per cent of all cases 
of tuberculosis receive the infection in childhood. 

Arrangements are made by appointment with local physicians, 
county, township, and city officials, tuberculosis associations, Red Cross 
societies, ministers, and civic bodies for exhibits, moving and stereopti- 
con pictures, lectures, distribution of literature, visiting the tuberculous, 
conducting of clinics under the auspices of county medical societies, and 
visiting of schools. 

Intensive campaigns were carried on in Hancock, Rush, Wayne, 
Switzerland, Ohio, Fulton, Harrison, Blackford, Franklin, Vermillion, 
Parke, Marshall, Morgan, Posey, Pike, Crawford, Perry, Johnson, Tip- 
pecanoe, and White Counties. Beginning with December and during 
the winter months, the division visited, lectured, and demonstrated the 
work of the division by moving and stereopticon pictures to sixty graded 
and high schools. 

Following is the report of each quarter: 

The Tuberculosis Division of the State Board of Health has been 
unusually active during the quarter. The first two weeks of October 
were given to the Carroll County Fair, and the Greencastle Street Fair. 
Moving and stereopticon pictures on the prevention of tuberculosis were 
shown and literature was distributed. 

A change was made in the personnel and Miss Flora Dutcher, R. N., 
was appointed as nurse for the division. 

The last half of the month was given to an intensive campaign in 
Hancock County. The Tuberculosis Association gave full co-operation 
and arranged for the various meetings throughout the county. Foun- 
taintown, New Palestine, Charlottesville, Wilkinson, Mt. Comfort, Fort- 
ville, Maxwell, Mohawk, Shirley and Greenfield schools were visited 
during the day and lectures with moving and stereopticon pictures were 
given to the general public in the evenings. In all these various places 
the families in which tuberculosis has been reported were visited and 
the active and suspicious cases were reported to the Tuberculosis Asso- 
ciation of the county for follow-up work, All the physicians in the 
county were visited and urged to report their patients to the county 
health officer. 

From the 23d to the 25th the division attended the State Conference 
of Charities and Correction at Muncie. On Sunday, during the confer- 
ence, the director addressed an audience in the Selma M. E. Church 
upon tuberculosis control. 

At the close of the campaign in Hancock County a tuberculosis 






State Boajd of Health 349 

clinic was held in Dr. C. H. Brunei's office at Greenfield under the 
auspices of the Hancock County Medical Society. Dr. H. S. Hatch, 
Superintendent of Sunnyside Sanatorium, conducted the clinic. Fifteen 
persons were examined and eleven were found to have positive tubercu- 
losis. 

During the month of November intensive tuberculosis campaigns 
were conducted in Rush and Wayne Counties in co-operation with the 
county tuberculosis associations. At Manila in Rush County, the divi- 
sion held a joint meeting with the Parent-Teachers' Association. Talks 
were made by Dr. Barnum, Rev. Able, Supt. Minor, and the director. 
The division visited the schools at New Salem, Glenwood, Moscow, Mays, 
Raleigh, and Rushville. Lectures illustrated with moving and stereop- 
ticon pictures were given in the evenings in each of these places. The 
director addressed the Rush County Medical Association upon the "Pre- 
vention and Control of Tuberculosis," and all of the physicians were 
urged to report at the Kiwanis Club, and spoke on tuberculosis control. 

In Wayne County, Miss Ethel Clarke, Executive Secretary of the 
Social Service Bureau of Wayne County, arranged the itinerary and 
rendered whole-hearted co-operation. The schools at Milton, Cambridge 
City, Hagerstown, Fountain City, White Water, Centerville, Jackson- 
burg, Boston, Green's Fork, Economy, Dublin, and Richmond were vis- 
ited and talks were given to all the school children instructing them 
how to avoid consumption. In the evening lectures with moving and 
stereopticon pictures were given. 

The division held a joint meeting with the Federation of Farmers 
at Economy, Green's Fork and Williamsburg, and the director spoke 
especially in reference to tuberculosis in animals. 

On the 2d of November, Dr. McKane and Mr. Law were guests of 
the Rotary Club at Richmond. Two reels of moving pictures on tuber- 
culosis prevention and control were shown. Great interest was mani- 
fested in this meeting. 

At the close of the campaign in Wayne County, the division held 
a clinic in Richmond. Dr. J. H. Stygall, Medical Director of the In- 
diana Tuberculosis Association, conducted the clinic with Dr. Markely 
of Richmond assisting. Seventeen patients were examined and seven 
were found to have positive tuberculosis. 

The director and nurse, with the assistance of the local workers, 
visited and investigated 225 tuberculous persons and a report of the 
cases was given to the Tuberculosis Association for follow-up work. 

In December, the division visited the public schools in North Ver- 
non, Columbus, East Columbus, Williams, Heltonville, Tunnelton, Spring- 
ville, Bedford, Vincennes, Washington, Shoals, and Mitchell. Dr. Wynn, 
the school physician of Bedford, said that each pupil (2,300 in number) 
had had physical examination this year. An evening meeting with 
lectures and moving and stereopticon pictures was held in all of these 
places, and splendid co-operation was given by all. 

SUMMARY 

Eight counties were visited during the quarter; forty-five cities and 
towns were visited; two tuberculosis clinics were held; about four thou- 



350 Year Book 

sand pieces of literature were distributed; and about seven thousand 
persons attended the meetings. 

During the month of January the following named counties were 
visited: Tippecanoe, Hendricks, Putnam, Parke, Vermillion, Clinton, 
Madison, Fountain, and Jasper. In Tippecanoe County the Union Town- 
ship Consolidated School, the Mortimoor, Westpoint, Romney, Clarks- 
hill, Stockwell, and Lafayette Schools were visited and talks were given 
to the pupils. In the evening public meetings were held under the 
auspices of the Grain Growers Association and lectures on the preven- 
tion of tuberculosis were illustrated by moving and stereopticon pic- 
tures. An illustrated lecture was also given at St. Elizabeth's Hos- 
pital in Lafayette to the sisters and nurses. An additional feature of 
the work in Tippecanoe County was the showing of a two-reel picture, 
furnished by the State Veterinarian, depicting the bovine type of tuber- 
culosis. 

At North Salem, Roachdale, Montezuma, Dana, Colfax, Covington, 
Attica, Veedersburg, and Remington the usual program of visiting the 
schools and holding meetings for the general public was carried out. 

Lectures on the prevention of tuberculosis were delivered before 
the Rotary Club of Anderson and the Optimist Club of Lafayette. 

The division has added to its equipment the latest kolograph moving 
picture machine with a stereopticon attached. The machine has a 1,000- 
watt radiation and can be propelled by an electric generator attached to 
an automobile, making it possible to give full moving and stereopticon 
demonstrations remote from centers of population. 

During the month of February, Newton and White Counties were 
visited. In Newton County the schools of Goodland and Kentland were 
visited during the day and meetings for the general public were held 
in the evening. 

In White County a campaign was held under the auspices of the 
Red Cross and the Farmers' Federation. The rural schools were vis- 
ited during the day and a joint public meeting was held in the Monti- 
cello high school in the evening. In addition to the talks and lectures 
given in the schools physical examinations of several hundred children 
were made. In Cass Township four rural schools were visited and a 
joint public meeting was held at Bell Centre. 

From the 13th to the 18th, inclusive, the division attended the Pub- 
lic Health Institute at Indianapolis, and on the 23d and 24th the State 
Convention of the Indiana Tuberculosis Association. 

The last of the month the division returned to White County to 
complete its work. The schools of Reynolds were visited and a joint 
meeting was held with the Farm Federation in the Presbyterian Church 
at Meadow Lake. 

The division did intensive field work in White County the first of 
March under the auspices of the American Red Cross and the Farm 
Federation, Miss Linnie Best, County Nurse, representing the Red 
Cross, and Roscoe Frazier, County Agent, representing the. Farm Fed- 
eration. 

The director and Miss Best visited the Monon schools and spoke in 
all rooms. Miss Dutcher visited three one-room schools during the day 
with Mr. Frazier. 



j 

State Board of Health 351 

A public evening meeting was held in the high school auditorium. 
A full program of moving and stereopticon pictures, including "Out of 
the Shadows," a film depicting the bovine type of tuberculosis, was 
shown. Roscoe Frazier was chairman. Miss Best and the director 
spoke. Three hundred persons were present. 

The personnel of the division was entertained at a six o'clock dinner 
in the Monon Hotel by Dr. Ross Reagen, the city health officer. 

The next day four one-room schoolhouses were visited. The director 
and the two nurses, Miss Best and Miss Dutcher, spoke to the pupils of 
these schools. 

A public evening meeting was held jointly with the farmers in the 
Round Grove M. E. Church, Round Grove Township. One hundred fifty 
were present. Thomas Tolin, president of the Farm Federation, pre- 
sided. 

The Chalmers and Brookston schools were visited the next day. 
The director and the county nurse spoke to the pupils of these schools. 
Miss Dutcher spent the day visiting three small schools in the rural 
districts, 

A public evening entertainment of moving pictures and talks was 
given in the high school assembly of the Brookston school. The di- 
rector and Mr. Frazier spoke, laying special emphasis upon the bovine 
type of tuberculosis. Two hundred fifty persons were present- 
Some of the dairymen in this community had refused to have their 
herds tested for tuberculosis. 

On the week of the sixth the division was in Pulaski County. This 
was "Health Week" for Pulaski County, carried on under the auspices 
of the County Superintendent of Schools, Frederick Neel. 

The division was in co-operation with the workers of the Indiana 
Tuberculosis Association, Mr. Cosper, field agent; Miss Shepherd, Cru- 
sade Worker; Indiana University Extension Department; the Misses 
Pitt and Loveless, registered nurses; Mr. Mathews, County Agent; and 
Dr. Kigin of the Veterinary Department of Purdue University. 

Public evening meetings were held in most of the centers of popu- 
lation, the work being divided among the different workers. The schools 
were visited, and many of the pupils inspected for physical defects. 
Inspection was made of the pupils of Center, Fairview, Walters, Mon- 
terey public and parochial schools. Of the 289 children inspected 102 
were found with defective tonsils, 203 with defective teeth, 70 with de- 
fective eyes, 33 with defective ears, and 163 under weight, and 101 over 
weight. The division was greeted by large audiences at Winamac, 
Beardstown, and Star City. 

A tuberculosis clinic was held in Winamac, conducted by Dr. J. H. 
Stygall, medical director of the Indiana Tuberculosis Association. Twen- 
ty-seven persons were found to have active tuberculosis. 

The 13th was given to a meeting at the State Sanatorium. Dr. and 
Mrs. Carter entertained the personnel of the division over night. Mr. 
Law gave a demonstration of moving and stereopticon pictures to the 
delight of the patients and the help of the institution. All but ten of 
the- 120 patients were able to attend the entertainment. Dr. Carter said 
that there had been only one death at the sanitorium in six months and 



352 



Year Book 



that there never had been a death of a child during his administration. 
There are at present thirty-nine children, and all are attending school. 
This record should dispel the fear of acquiring tuberculosis at a tuber- 
culosis hospital. 

The next day the division visited the schools of Marshall and gave 
a public evening meeting to an audience of 200. 

On account of the bad condition of the roads the division abandoned 
further work in the field. Preparations were made to begin the sum- 
mer campaign in the rural districts. The division will start the sum- 
mer work in Switzerland County the first of April. 

Upon inspection of 289 children in the Walter, Fairview, Center, 
Monterey public and parochial schools in Pulaski County, none of the 
children was found normal. 

IN THE PAROCHIAL SCHOOL IN MONTEREY 



Examination of Teeth 



35 children, 

13 children, 

13 children, 

8 children, 

4 children, 

8 children, 

2 children, 

3 children, 

4 children, 
1 child, 

1 child, 



no cavities 

1 cavity 

2 cavities 

3 cavities 

4 cavities 

5 cavities 

6 cavities 

7 cavities 

8 cavities 

11 cavities 

12 cavities 



27 children, 
21 children, 
13 children, 
47 children, 
41 children, 
5 children, 



Other Defects 

bad tonsils 
defective eyes 
defective ears 
over weight 
under weight 
perfect weight 



IN THE CENTER SCHOOL 



Examination of Teeth 



17 children, 


no cavities 


17 children, 


1 cavity 


8 children, 


2 cavities 


2 children, 


2 cavities 


7 children, 


2 cavities 


5 children, 


4 cavities 


3 children, 


5 cavities 


2 children, 


6 cavities 


5 children, 


7 cavities 


1 child, 


8 cavities 


2 children, 


10 cavities 


1 child, 


13 cavities 


1 child, 


15 cavities 



Other Defects 
27 children, had tonsils 

7 children, bad eyes 

4 children, bad ears 
17 children, over weight 
41 children, under weight 

4 children, perfect weight 



IN THE FAIRVIEW SCHOOL 



Examination of Teeth 



19 children, 
9 children, 
2 children, 
children, 
children, 
children, 
children, 
child, 



1 child, 



no cavities 

1 cavity 

2 cavities 

3 cavities 

4 cavities 

5 cavities 

7 cavities 

8 cavities 
10 cavities 



Other Defects 
19 children, bad tonsils 
15 children, bad eyes 

4 children, bad ears 
24 children, over weight 
22 children, under weight 

2 children, perfect weight 



Examination of Teeth 


11 children, 


no cavities 


5 children, 


1 cavity 


8 children, 


2 cavities 


4 children, 


3 cavities 


6 children, 


4 cavities 


5 children, 


5 cavities 


6 children. 


6 cavities 


1 child, 


8 cavities 


1 child, 


16 cavities 



I 

State Board of Health 353 



IN THE WALTER SCHOOL 

Other Defects 
15 children, defective tonsils 
17 children defective eyes 
7 children, defective ears 
6 children, over weight 
• 36 children, under weight 



The division conducted educational campaigns in Ohio, Switzerland, 
Fulton, and Vigo Counties during the month of April. 

In Ohio County public evening meetings were held in Rising Sun 
and Aberdeen, and day meetings and inspections were held in six one- 
room schoolhouses. Mrs. Claudia Johnson, Red Cross county nurse, gave 
splendid co-operation. 

In Switzerland County, the division was in co-operation with the 
Indiana State Tuberculosis Association, represented by Mr. Cosper and 
Miss Sheperd, and the State University Extension Department, repre- 
sented by Miss Pitt and Miss Loveless. Inspections of school children 
were made and public evening meetings were held in Vevay, Patriot, 
Moorefield, Bennington, and East Enterprise. Day meetings and in- 
spections of school children were made in eight one-room schoolhouses. 
There were 549 school children inspected. Dr. J. H. Stygall, Medical 
Director of the Indiana State Tuberculosis Association, conducted a 
clinic in Vevay. Twenty-nine were examined and only three were found 
to be tuberculous. 

In Fulton County the division was hindered in its activities on 
account of excessive rains and flooded roads. Meetings were held in 
Rochester and Akron. Miss Fannie Thomas, Red Cross county nurse, 
assisted the division materially. Dr. J. H. Stygall conducted a clinic. 
Eight persons were examined and none was found to be tuberculous. 

The division took part in the Milk Week campaign at Terre Haute 
and Vigo County the first week of May. The director was on the offi- 
cial program. He spoke also to the students of the State Normal. 

A full program of moving and stereopticon pictures was given at 
Valley Mills. 

The division carried on a campaign in Harrison County during the 
month of May. Public evening meetings were held in Lanesville, New 
Amsterdam, Laconia, New Salisbury, and Palmyra. Large and en- 
thusiastic audiences greeted the division in all these places. There were 
47 positive cases of tuberculosis reported out of the State Bacteriological 
Laboratory in the last three years for Harrison County. These were 
visited and investigated and twelve were found to be dead. 

The division participated in the Indiana Health Exposition in the 
Manufacturers Building at the State Fair Grounds. 

Miss Grace Pitt, R. N., was appointed nurse temporarily during the 
absence of Miss F. A. Dutcher, who is doing post-graduate work. 

Mr. Raymond Bright was appointed assistant to the director, to the 

23—22978 



354 Year Book 

position held by O. T. Law, who was transferred to the Food and Drug 
Department, State Board of Health. 

During the month of June the division was in Blackford, Franklin, 
and Morgan Counties. In Blackford County public evening meetings 
were held in Rolls, Trenton, Hartford City, Mill Grove, and Montpelier. 
The division was cordially received in all of these places. The Red 
Cross county nurse, Miss Lilah Curry, rendered whole-hearted co-opera- 
tion. There were 46 positive cases of tuberculosis reported to the State 
Bacteriological Laboratory in the last three years and these were vis- 
ited and investigated; twelve were found to be dead. Miss Pitt, the 
division nurse, discovered six new cases that had not been reported. 

Franklin County was visited and public evening meetings were held 
in Mt. Carmel, Oldenburg, Blooming Grove, Brookville, and Laurel. The 
division was cordially greeted by large and enthusiastic audiences in 
all of these places. The Franklin County Tuberculosis Association and 
the American Red Cross, represented by Mrs. Roscoe C. O'Byrne and 
Miss Edna Yoder, respectively, gave the division very hearty co-opera- 
tion. There were twenty active tuberculosis cases reported to the State 
Board of Health within the last three years from Franklin County, and 
these were visited and investigated. Miss Pitt discovered eleven new 
cases that had not been reported. 

Investigations were made of the known tuberculous in Martins- 
ville, Brooklyn, Mooresville, Monrovia, Cope, and Morgantown, Morgan 
County. Public evening meetings were held in Cope and Brooklyn. 

The division sent out a letter to seventy-six county and city nurses 
over the state for information concerning the known tuberculous in the 
communities. Reports and lists of names and addresses were received 
from Boone, Carroll, Gibson, Ripley, Shelby, Knox Counties. The re- 
ports contained the names of 407 persons. 

SUMMARY 

During the quarter work was carried on in eight counties; 17 
schools were visited; 549 school children inspected; 48 talks were given 
to school children ; thirty-eight public meetings were held ; approximately 
six thousand persons attended the meetings; 40 lectures were given; 
2 clinics were held; 38 persons were examined and 3 were found tuber- 
culous; 104 persons with tuberculosis were visited and investigated; 
407 positive cases of tuberculosis reported by nurses from nine coun- 
ties; 3,000 pieces of literature were distributed. 

The division conducted campaigns in Morgan, Vermillion, Marshall, 
and Parke Counties during July. Public evening meetings were held 
in Vermillion County at Dana, Cayuga, Perrysville, Newport and Uni- 
versal. Miss Emma Bunge, county nurse, stood sponsor for these meet- 
ings, and they were well attended by the people. 

In Marshall County the division was in co-operation with the County 
Farm Federation and very successful meetings were held at Brenne, 
Bourbon, Culver, Plymouth, and Oliver Webb's farm in Polk Township. 
Miss Miriam Kehler, county nurse, gave the division hearty co-opera- 
tion. Mr. Ben Wilkins, of the State Entomology Department, accom- 
panied the division and showed a film on the care of bees. 



State Board of Health 355 

In Parke County meetings were held in Rockville, Bridgeton, Rose- 
dale, Bloomingdale, and Tangier. The county superintendent, Professor 
J. B. Jollief, arranged the itinerary and assisted the division very ma- 
terially. 

Two meetings were held in Morgan County: Morgantown and Mon- 
rovia, which were well attended by the people. 

Lectures, moving and stereopticon demonstrations were given in all 
of these places. 

The first two weeks of August the division was in Posey and Pike 
Counties. Public evening meetings with lectures, moving and stereopti- 
con picture demonstrations were given in the following places in Posey 
County: Mt. Vernon, New Harmony, Stewartsville, and Posey ville. 

In Pike County the following places were visited: Petersburg, Win- 
slow, Otwell, Union and Stendal. The people attending these meetings 
aggregated 1,275. 

The division was on vacation from the 15th to the 30th of August. 
The director addressed the Posey County Teachers' Institute at 
Mt. Vernon on the 30th. 

Circulars were sent to 150 tuberculous persons during the month. 
Miss Grace Pitt, nurse, substitutes her report for the two counties. 
Number of cases of positive sputum made at State Laboratory from 
1919 to 1922, 19. 

Report on above cases: 

Dead 7 

Advanced 6 

Arrested 4 

Quiescent * 1 

No report 1 

Number of cases not previously reported. 17 

Homes visited 12 

Local physicians visited 12 

One local doctor reports that he has from fifty to seventy-five pa- 
tients with suspicious chest signs. 

PIKE COUNTY 

Number of positive sputum made at State Laboratory from 1919 to 

1922, 21. 

Report on above cases: 

Dead 8 

Advanced 4 

Arrested 5 

Quiescent 3 

No report 1 

Number of cases not previously reported 16 

Homes visited 11 

Local doctors visited 10 

During the quarter there were sent out from the office circulars 

bearing upon tuberculosis to 1,145 persons. The names of these people 

have been furnished the division by the nurses of the several counties 

and cities of the state. 



356 Year Book 

The division attended the Owen County Fair at Spencer from the 
27th to 30th of September. The exhibit and moving pictures were 
shown in the health tent to large crowds of people. 

SUMMARY 

Nine counties, 6 schools, 10 industries, and 2 teachers' institutes 
were visited; 35 evening meetings were held; 10,859 persons attended; 
3,500 pieces of literature were distributed; 22 talks to schools were 
given; 249 tuberculosis cases were investigated that were reported to 
State Laboratory; 136 cases of tuberculosis not previously reported were 
investigated; 101 calls were made at homes; 100 doctors were visited. 

FINAL SUMMARY 

During the year 32 counties and 80 schools were visited. There 
were 329 talks given to schools; 126 public meetings held with an at- 
tendance of approximately twenty-six hundred; lectures delivered, 130; 
literature distributed, 8,000; school children inspected, 829; tubercu- 
losis cases reported by the nurses over the state, 1,145; tuberculosis 
cases investigated, 578; calls at houses, 212; calls upon physicians, 165. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF VENEREAL DISEASES 

DR. W. F. KING, Director. 

DR. J. G. ROYSE, Assistant Director. 

L'. J. RAIL, State Investigator. 

The work of the Division of Venereal Diseases has been conducted 
along the same general lines as in the past: namely, education, pre- 
vention, control, and treatment. 

In the matter of treatment it may be said there has been no in- 
crease in the number of clinics, the same number of part-time and full- 
time clinics being maintained throughout the year as in the past. The 
list of these clinics, with their location, follows: 

Anderson Clinic, City Hall Building, Anderson, Indiana. 

Brazil Clinic, 10 E. Jackson Street, Brazil, Indiana. 

Columbus Clinic, Crump-Lucas Building, Columbus, Indiana. 

Evansville Clinic, Basement County Court House, Evansville, Indiana. 

Fort Wayne Clinic, 202% West Berry Street, Fort Wayne, Indiana. 

Hammond Clinic, First National Bank Building, Hammond, Indiana. 

Indianapolis Clinic, Market Street and Senate Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Jeffersonville Clinic, Jeffersonville Reformatory, Jeffersonville, Indiana. 

Kokomo Clinic, 107% Union Street, Kokomo, Indiana. 

Madison Clinic, corner Main and West Streets, Madison, Indiana. 

Marion Clinic, Queen City Building, Marion, Indiana. 

Michigan City Clinic, County and City Building, Michigan City, Indiana. 

Muncie Clinic, 207 North High Street, Muncie, Indiana. 

Newcastle Clinic, Mouch Building, Newcastle, Indiana. 

Richmond Clinic, Medical Building, Easthaven, Richmond, Indiana. 

South Bend Clinic, 114% South Lafayette Boulevard, South Bend, Indiana. 

Terre Haute Clinic, City Hall Building, T'erre Haute, Indiana. 

Penal Farm Clinic, Putnamville, Indiana. 



State Board of Health 357 

During the fiscal year a total of 5,491 new cases were admitted to 
these clinics. In the same time a total of 5,501 cases were discharged, 
some as cured, others after being rendered non-infectious, while many 
were transferred to private physicians and to health authorities out- 
side of the state. In explanation of the number of cases discharged 
exceeding new cases received at the clinics, many of the cases dis- 
charged were cases remaining under treatment from the previous year. 
And the fact that the number discharged exceed the number of new 
cases is an additional evidence of decreased prevalence of the venereal 
diseases. During the year a total of 1,310 cases were placed in deten- 
tion homes or under hospital treatment. Under the head of prevention 
and control a total of 7,087 cases of venereal diseases was investigated, 
while 5,306 visits were made by investigators from the various clinics. 
A total of 244 cases was placed in quarantine because of refusal to obey 
the reasonable orders and instructions of health officers. A total of 25 
cases of prosecution was brought because of violation of orders of 
health officers, the decision in every case being on the side of public 
welfare. Total of 245 cases was transferred to health officers outside 
the State of Indiana; 619 cases transferred to health officers within 
the state; and 108 transferred to the treatment of private physicians. 
Special emphasis has been placed on educational work. 

It is of prime importance that the entire population, as nearly as 
possible, of the State of Indiana know the real, essential facts per- 
taining to the venereal diseases. They must especially know the chain 
of connection between the incidence of the venereal diseases and the 
awful, final toll taken. It is believed that when the masses of people 
see this in its true light and know that much of insanity, all the loco- 
motor ataxia, many serious nerve affections, many of the heart disease 
cases, and, in fact, a considerable percentage of all the diseases of 
middle life — mostly as grouped under the so-called "degenerative dis- 
eases" — are in reality the end results of syphilis; and that much of the 
blindness, the majority of the operations upon women, with the resultant 
mutilations and sometimes death, inefficiency, broken homes and other 
ills make up the aftermath of the gonorrheal incidence, then the people 
of this commonwealth will take up the problem of eradicating these 
diseases in earnest. 

We, of course, through necessity, must reach the people in groups 
or classifications or in any other way that is most available. Two let- 
ters were sent to each of the mayors of the state — one of these letters 
calling their attention to the trail of venereal diseases which usually 
follow in the wake of traveling carnivals, and requesting that they give 
this matter their closest attention. The other letter explained to the 
mayors the purpose and plans of the venereal disease campaign and 
requested the names of the employes of each city. We have had splen- 
did response and as a result have sent an especially prepared letter to 
6,661 municipal employes, and enclosed therewith one of our leaflets 
entitled "What the People Must Know." This leaflet sets forth the 
salient facts regarding the venereal diseases, their prevalence, insidious- 
ness, persistence and the fact that the end result is usually attributed 
to something other than the true cause — syphilis or gonorrhea. 



358 Year Book 

We have also written to each one of the 92 Auditors of State, re- 
questing the names of the county employes, and as a result we have a 
large number of lists of these employes to whom we will send letters 
and literature during the coming year. Special literature explaining the 
venereal disease control work and its importance to industry was sent 
to the heads of 166 manufacturing enterprises of the state. Although 
most of the civic and social organizations of the state are in hearty 
sympathy with the campaign against venereal diseases, we deem it im- 
portant to keep up the line of communication between these organiza- 
tions and this bureau and to keep them informed from time to time so 
that their co-operation may be sustained and continuous. To this end 
we have sent letters to the president of each local Parent-Teachers' 
Association and to the president of every woman's club in the state — 
the latter having received two series of letters during this year. In 
these letters we have reviewed the work of the campaign somewhat and 
enclosed literature for distribution to the several members. The Wom- 
an's Christian Temperance Union has given especial attention to aiding 
us in every manner in our community work. A large number of the 
locals have put on community campaigns and distributed many thou- 
sand pamphlets. In addition, some of them have conducted exhibits or 
arranged for film showings and lectures. The League of Women Voters 
of Indiana has also rendered valuable assistance by distributing pam- 
phlets to its membership. The reason that most of the work this year 
was directed toward women's organizations is that about all of the 
men's organizations and groups had been reached in former years. 

In addition to the above much scattering work was done upon re- 
quest of many activities and groups — Y. M. C. A., high schools, clubs, 
organizations, etc. 

During the year two form letters were sent to all the physicians of 
Indiana. We deem it important that we communicate with the physi- 
cians occasionally and send them excerpts from the latest literature per- 
taining to the diagnosis and treatment of venereal diseases. During 
the year the Indiana Council on Social Hygiene was organized. Since 
this whole work is primarily a responsibility of the citizenry at large, 
it is endeavored through this organization to bring into co-ordination the 
effort of most of the civic and social organizations. 

This bureau took an active part in the Indianapolis Public Health 
Institute held in Indianapolis in February. A splendid exhibit was ar- 
ranged and lectures were given by numerous persons who were deemed 
most qualified to handle the subjects. In addition to this, clinics and 
laboratory facilities were available for attending physicians. 

This division also had an exhibition at the Indiana Health Exposi- 
tion held at the State Fair Grounds in May. 

During the year there were 56 film showings, but owing to inade- 
quacy of reports it is impossible to state the attendance. There were 
fourteen showings of exhibits — likewise it is impossible to name the 
attendance. There were sixty-seven lectures with an attendance of 
11,443 persons. During the year we distributed 79,918 pamphlets — of 
these 27,763 were sent upon request and 52,165 were sent out upon our 
own initiative. 



State Board of Health 359 

REPORT OF THE HOUSING DIVISION OF THE INDIANA STATE 
BOARD OF HEALTH 

PERSONNEL 

W. F. SHARPE, Director. 

A. E. WERT, Assistant Director. 

Z. SHOLTY, Clerk. 

This is the first annual report of the work of the Housing Division 
of the Indiana State Board of Health, and is for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 1922. 

The Housing Division began its work October 1, 1921, by virtue of 
a specific appropriation made to the State Board of Health at the 72d 
regular session of the General Assembly, which session convened Janu- 
ary 6, 1921. 

The housing law of 1913 is a code of minimum requirements to be 
observed in the erection of tenements and apartments in our incorporated 
cities^ to the end that sufficient light, air, yard spaces, comfort, health 
and convenience shall be insured to the inhabitants of this class of 
dwellings. The law of 1917 is entitled, "An act concerning dwellings 
or places of residence unfit for human habitation or dangerous or detri- 
mental to life and health and providing penalties." 

These two laws, in their titles, suggested an opportunity for sub- 
dividing the work of administration between the director and assistant 
director, the director administering the law of 1913, and the assistant 
director administering the law of 1917, though the Housing Division 
always acts as a single unit of administration. 

FIELD CONTACT WITH THE WORK 

The law of 1913 brings the director in contact with the local build- 
ing inspectors, architects, realtors, builders, city clerks and property 
owners in the various cities, who are planning or are building tenements 
or apartments. This contact is more effective when personal, though 
very much good has been accomplished also through correspondence 
alone. This personal and correspondence contact has secured the volun- 
tary submission of a large number of building projects to the Housing 
Division, which in all cases have been checked over and corrections 
made where not in accord with the housing law. Only a few of those 
plans are on file in the office as the director does not find a specific clause 
in the housing law to require it. In the light of the year's experience 
the director now believes that the Housing Division could venture to 
require, on the authorization of the State Board of Health, that all 
plans and specifications for tenements and apartment houses should be 
sent to the Housing Division in duplicate, one to be retained in the 
office, excepting in those cases where there is a local building inspector 
to retain a copy. This would enable the Housing Division to secure a 
more efficient and a more economical administration of the law of 1913, 
because more of the work could be done in the office and thus reduce 
the expense to the state of doing so much traveling. 

As a body of reasonable rules and regulations adopted by the 



360 Year Book 

State Board of Health to carry on its authorized work is held by the 
courts to have the authority of law, the above suggestion could be made 
effective without any modification in the housing law of 1913. The pro- 
posed rules and regulations herewith submitted include the above men- 
tioned rule. 

The director advises against asking for amendments to any of our 
housing laws at the coming session of the legislature. They are all 
good laws, with a few minor defects, and all that is needed is to keep 
up and extend their enforcement. In my judgment, it will require an- 
other year or more to bring about the maximum enforcement of the 
law of 1913. 

The rapid development of zoning by the city plan commissions 
throughout the state will make possible another source of desirable co- 
operation with the Housing Division, and the enactment of a wise state- 
wide building code would be another source of co-operation. 

The local co-operative machinery for enforcing the law of 1913 in 
the various cities is potentially and legally present, but will require 
much insistence and patient pioneer work of the Division of Housing 
to make it more effective. 

The local machinery for enforcing the law of 1917 was already a 
disciplined unit consisting of local health officers and health boards 
already accustomed to similar branches of work designed to conserve 
public health and safety. 

The local forces of the State Board of Health have been utilized 
to advantage by the assistant director, and has incidentally emphasized 
the need of all-time local health officers. 

The assistant director, Mr. A. E. Wert, has accomplished good work 
in the administration of the law of 1917. The assistant director in the 
line of his duties comes upon his work mainly by direct personal in- 
vestigation of the bad housing conditions that have been found to exist 
in all our cities; he took photographs and notes on the spot; he secured 
the co-operation of the local health officers, police force, prosecuting 
attorneys, public health nurses, and community welfare organizations, 
and has prepared legal notices against negligent landlords where neces- 
sary and has already secured a 75% compliance with these orders, as 
the attached report of the assistant director shows; the remaining 25% 
of cases are still pending. But one appeal was taken by the owner to 
the circuit court and this case is still pending. 

REPORTS 

Both the director and the assistant director have made reports of 
the numerous trips made over the state. The director has visited 31 
different cities in his work and the assistant director has visited all the 
incorporated cities in the state. 

The records of the office contain copies of all trip, monthly, and 
quarterly reports. 

INDIANA HEALTH EXPOSITION 

From May 19-27, 1922, there was held at the State Fair Grounds 
in the Manufacturers Building a state health exposition. The Housing 



State Board op Health 361 

Division, as it was the youngest division under the State Board of 
Health and in order to make a creditable showing, had almost to create 
an exhibit to best illustrate the character of its work. 

The exhibit brought into sharp contrast good and bad housing con- 
ditions. Enlarged photographs were shown of certain bad housing con- 
ditions in the state. The exhibit was designed and carried out by the 
assistant director. 

THE MORRISON RURAL SURVEY 

On June 12, 1922, Mr. J. N. Morrison was appointed and commis- 
sioned by the State Board of Health to make a special investigation of 
rural housing and living conditions in Hamilton County. 

Mr. Morrison was attached to the Housing Division at a salary of 
$150 per month and expenses, and is paid out of the original appro- 
priation of $15,000. The Housing Division at once equipped Mr. Mor- 
rison with blank report cards and a Ford roadster for the work. There 
are 1,001 cards of information obtained from as many different rural 
homes containing 50 items of information on each card. 

The director and clerk made a digest of the first 500 cards of this 
survey and made a report and observations on same under date of Sep- 
tember 6, 1922, to the secretary of the State Board of Health. Your 
attention is invited to this report, Mr. Morrison having secured much 
valuable data in the survey and having done the work most thoroughly 
and satisfactorily. 

PUBLICITY 

Your special attention is called to the extensive number of photo- 
graphs which have accumulated by virtue of the field work of Mr. Wert. 
Lantern slides have been made of many of these views and they have 
been used both by the director and the assistant director in giving illus- 
trated talks to clubs throughout the state, usually a 30-minute talk fol- 
lowing the noon luncheons; occasionally an evening and longer talk 
was given. This was found to be an effective means of bringing the 
work of the Housing Division before the public. A copy of all photo- 
graphs taken is on file in the office with the proper identification and 
date written thereon. 

Early in the fiscal year the office force prepared a pamphlet edi- 
tion of the housing laws of 1913, 1917, and the zoning law of 1921, and 
printed an edition of 5,000 copies, of which about 4,300 are on hand, 
the other 700 copies having been sent out to architects, building in- 
spectors, city clerks, mayors, editors, realtors, and local health officers 
throughout the state. 

The director also prepared a series of ten articles on various phases 
of "Housing and Health" early in the year, and these were generally 
published by the public press of the state. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR'S REPORT 

The assistant director's special report for the year's work is hereto 
attached and made a part of this report. 



362 



Year Book 



conclusion 

The first year's operation of the Housing Division has been largely 
pioneer work. 

The secretary, Dr. J. N. Hurty, pointed out the general trend of the 
work at the beginning of the fiscal year, and his long experience and 
guiding counsel has been one of our main assets in the year's work. 
The work of the entire staff has been efficient and harmonious through- 
out the year and the thanks of the division is hereby extended to the 
state board, the secretary and assistant secretary for the many courtesies 
extended to the division throughout the year. 

EEPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 

The work of the assistant director consists of field inspections, 
enforcing and following up of the provisions of the Indiana housing 
laws as provided for by Chapter 21, Statutes of 1917, "concerning dwell- 
ings and property unfit for human habitation or detrimental to life and 
health." 

The department has received full co-operation of various city au- 
thorities and health officials throughout the state, and has investigated 
and remedied many cases that have been brought to our attention by 
the public health nurses. 

The object has been to assure local health officials of state backing 
and help, to investigate actual conditions, to handle and enforce obsti- 
nate cases in which local officials have not been able to get proper com- 
pliance with their orders, to order improvements in cases that have not 
been brought to their attention, and to secure photographic evidence of 
existing violations, these photographs being used in connection with edu- 
cational talks and prosecutions if necessary. The work accomplished in 
the period covered by this report is shown by the attached schedule. 

SCHEDULE 





First 
Quarter 


Second 
Quarter 


Third 
Quarter 


Fourth 
Quarter 


Total 




16 
55 
167 
16 
16 
34 
30 
4 
47 


17 
75 

296 
42 
42 
56 
54 
2 
63 


34 
44 

386 
83 
83 
55 
36 
19 

113 


33 

49 

505 

132 

132 

31 

19 

12 

165 


100 




223 




1,354 




273 




273 




176 




139 




37 




388 


— =L_: J 





Official orders (state) sent out ; 

Cases appealed (Kokomo, S. S. Henry, now in court) . 
Lectures and talks before clubs and officials (informal) 

Illustrated 

Trip reports filed with director 



DISTRIBUTION OF VERBAL AND WRITTEN ORDERS 

Verbal orders issued 273 

Written orders issued 176 



Total 449 



State Board of Health 



363 



Houses, rooms, parts of houses and apartments vacated 54 

Houses and parts of houses rased 9 

Houses and parts of houses repaired 49 

Vaults cleaned 75 

Garbage 33 

Cesspools cleaned and repaired 8 

Wells and cisterns cleaned and repaired 7 

Halls lighted 14 

Hand rails ordered on stairs 7 

Inside toilets repaired 15 

Trash in yard 53 

Houses cleaned 33 

Water supply repaired 11 

Plumbing repaired 11 

Ventilation bettered 8 

Living in basement 3 

Stock in house 4 

Sewer and drain repaired 28 

Sheds removed 11 

Hogs and chickens 11 

Hides and junk 5 

Total 449 

Two houses in Michigan City vacated by this department and razed 
by State Fire Marshal. 

CITIES AND TOWNS VISITED 



First Quarter 



Evansville 

Princeton 

Vincennes 

Lebanon 

Crawfordsville 

Frankfort 

Gary 

Michigan City 

South Bend 

Peru 

Logansport 

Wabash 

Marion 

Kokomo 

Tipton 

Noblesville 



Second Quarter 



Fort Wayne 

Richmond 

Connersville 

Rushville 

Greensburg 

Shelbyville 

Hammond 

Whiting 

Indiana Harbor 

East Chicago 

Newcastle 

Anderson 

Muncie 

Logansport 



Crawfordsville 
Thorntown 
" | Lebanon 

Third Quarter 
Lafayette (2) 
Greencastle (2) 
Danville (2) 
Greenfield (2) 
Seymour 
Columbus 
Ladoga 
Veedersburg 
Covington 
Attica 

Frankfort (2) 
Lebanon ( 2 ) 
Thorntown 
Anderson 
Newcastle 
Cambridge City 
Richmond 
Connersville 
Rushville 
Shelbyville 
Franklin 
Crawfordsville 
Delphi 
Monticello 
Rensselaer 
Rochester 
Logansport 
Kokomo 



364 Year Book 

Fourth Quarter Spencer 

Connersville Greencastle 

Rushville Crawfordsville 

Brookville Lafayette 

Lawrenceburg Delphi 

Aurora Monticello 

Rising Sun Logansport 

Vevay Winamac 

Madison Plymouth 

Vernon Warsaw 

North Vernon Columbia City 

Seymour Huntington 

Columbus Bluffton 

Nashville Montpelier 

Franklin Hartford City 

Martinsville Muncie 

Bloomington Anderson 

Total, 100. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF VITAL STATISTICS 

H. M. WRIGHT, Registrar-Statistician. 

DIVISION STAFF 

HELEN SCRUBY, Certificate Clerk. 
CATHERINE DOERRE, Clerk-Typist. 
JULIA SPITZ, Clerk. 
KATHRYN GLEASON, Stenographer. 
JENNIE HOWE, Clerk. 
Transcribing Clerks for U. S. Census Bureau — 
JOSEPHINE WISHMIER (births). 
ANNE VINTON (births). 
ADAH L. KENDALL (deaths). 

INTRODUCTION 

The annual report of the Vital Statistics Division will be found in 
the following thirty-three tables, several showing comparison for past 
ten years. These tables have been prepared to give as much informa- 
tion as possible with limited space, more detailed tables are on file in 
this office. Total births in the state show an increase of 3,438, while 
total deaths show a decrease of 4,296 over the preceding year. Some 
diseases show an increase while others have decreased. The following 
comparison of death rates for five years in the state makes ready com- 
parison. 

1921 1920 1919 1918 1917 

Total births (stillbirths excl.) 68,247 64,809 59,273 64,313 63,073 

Total deaths (stillbirths excl.) 35,134 39,430 37,077 46,361 39,785 

Birth rate per 1,000 population 23.3 22.1 20.1 22.1 21.8 

Death rate per 1,000 population 12.0 13.4 12.5 15.9 13.7 

Deaths of infants (under 1 year) per 1,000 

births , ,,,, ,,,,,',,,,>, 71.2 81.4 79.1 88.4 84.4 



State Board of Health 



365 



Death rate per 100,000 population from the 
following diseases: 

Tuberculosis (all forms) 92.7 

Typhoid fever 12.3 

Diphtheria-Croup 23.9 

Scarlet fever 5.2 

Measles 2.4 

Whooping cough 11.8 

Pneumonia (all forms) 80.2 

Influenza 10.6 

Diarrhoea-Enteritis (under 2 years) 37.9 

Puerperal Septicemia 6.2 

Cancer 91.7 

Deaths from external causes 86.4 



107.7 


110.8 


136.3 


137.4 


9.6 


11.5 


13.7 


17.1 


12.2 


10.9 


14.7 


15.3 


6.6 


2.7 


4.0 


4.9 


9.8 


2.4 


4.1 


19.0 


8.9 


2.2 


16.1 


8.6 


141.6 


113.5 


193.7 


128.4 


78.1 


99.4 


216.4 


19.5 


35.2 


34.8 


42.6 


51.1 


7.6 


6.3 


8.4 


7.0 


88.4 


85.4 


88.0 


87.9 


82.9 


77.9 


94.0 


104.4 



INDEX 

1921 STATISTICAL TABLES 

Table No. 

Deaths from all causes with rates per 100,000 of population 1 

Deaths by counties, showing sex, color and nationality of deceased 2 

City births and deaths with rate per 1,000 of population , 3 

By occupation for certain diseases 4 

Rural and urban comparison 4 

Births by counties and sections with rate per 1,000 population 5 

Deaths by counties and sections with rate per 1,000 population 6 

Marriages by counties for 4 years 7 

Tuberculosis (all forms) by counties v/ith rates 8 

Typhoid fever by counties with rate per 100,000 of population 9 

Cancer by counties with rate per 100,000 of population- 10 

Deaths from all causes (abridged) , 5 year comparison 11 

Tuberculosis (all forms), by months and age with 10 year comparison 12 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary), by months and age with 10 year comparison 13 

Typhoid fever, by months and age with 10 year comparison 14 

Diphtheria-Croup, by months and age with 10 year comparison 15 

Scarlet fever, by months and age with 10 year comparison 16 

Measles, by months and age with 10 year comparison 17 

Pneumonia (all forms) , by months and age with 10 year comparison 18 

Diarrhoeal diseases, by months and age with 10 year comparison 19 

Influenza, by months and age with 10 year comparison 20 

Cancer, by months with 10 year comparison 21 

External causes, by months with 10 year comparison 21 

External causes, by cause with 10 year comparison 22 

Smallpox, by months with 10 year comparison 23 

City deaths from huberculosis and typhoid fever with rate per 100,000 24 

City deaths from pneumonia and influenza with rate per 100,000 25 

City deaths from cancer and external causes with rate per 100,000 26 

Infant mortality rate per 1,000 births by counties 27 

Births by months, sex, color, etc. 28 

Deaths by months, sex, color, etc., with 10 year comparison 29 

Deaths by ages in the state with comparison for 10 years 30 

Mortality, State of Indiana, 5 year comparison 31 

Colored mortality of state during year 1921 32 

The Puerperal State, special table 33 



366 



Year Book 



TABLE No. 1. 

DEATHS IN INDIANA, DURING THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1921, WITH RATES PER 
100,000 OF POPULATION (U. S. CENSUS). 



Causes op Death 



TOTAL STATE OF INDIANA (Stillbirths excluded). 



Total 


Rate 


35,134 


12.0 


9,178 


312.8 


360 


12.3 


33 


1.1 


21 


.7 


71 


2.4 


154 


5.2 


348 


11.8 


700 


23.9 


311 


10.6 


5 


.2 


163 


5.5 


101 


3.4 


9 


.3 


118 


4.0 


1 


.03 


1 


.03 


58 


1.9 


2 


.07 


5 


.2 


2,173 


74.1 


81 


2.7 


142 


4.8 


172 


5.9 


34 


1.1 


17 


.6 


50 


1.6 


43 


1.4 


15 


.5 


206 


7.0 


13 


.4 


103 


3.5 


1,050 


35.8 


318 


10.8 


398 


13.6 


230 


7.8 


107 


3.6 


475 


16.2 


26 


.9 


95 


3.2 


101 


3.4 


1 


.03 


421 


14.4 


65 


2.2 


11 


.4 


59 


2.0 


207 


7.0 


54 


1.8 


50 


1.6 


2 


.07 


3 


.1 


6 


.2 


4,350 


148.3 


51 


1.7 


94 


3.2 


158 


5.3 


53 


1.8 


26 


.9 


51 


1.7 


34 


1.1 


147 


5.0 


2,701 


92.4 


35 


1.2 


375 


12.8 


203 


6.9 


83 


2.8 


117 


4.0 


4 


.1 


44 


1.4 


15 


.5 



International I. General Diseases 

Number 

1 Typhoid fever 

4 Malaria 

5 Smallpox 

6 Measles 

7 Scarlet fever 

8 Whooping cough 

9 Diphtheria and croup 

10 Influenza 

13 Cholera nostras 

14 Dysentery 

18 Erysipelas 

19 Other epidemic diseases 

20 Purulent infection and septicemia 

22 Anthrax 

23 Rabies 

24 Tetanus 

25 M ycosis 

26 Pellagra 

28 Tuberculosis of the lungs 

29 Acute miliary tuberculosis 

30 Tuberculosis meningitis 

31 Abdominal tuberculosis : 

32 Pott's disease 

33 White swellings 

34 Tuberculosis of other organs 

3 5 Disseminated tuberculosis : 

36 Rickets 

37 Syphilis 

38 Gonococcus infection 

39 Cancer of the buccal cavity 

40 Cancer oi stomach, liver 

41 Cancer of peritoneum, intestines, rectum 

42 Cancer of female genital organs ; 

43 Cancer of the breast 

44 Cancer of the skin , '. : 

45 Cancer of other organs 

46 Other tumors 

47 Acute articular rheumatism 

48 Chronic rheumatism and gout 

49 Scurvy 

50 Diabetes 

51 , Exophthalmic goitre 

52 Addison's disease 

53 Leuchemia 

54 Anemia, chlorosis 

55 Other general diseases . 

56 Alcholism (acute or chronic) 

57 Chronic lead poisoning . . . . 

58 Other chronic occupation poisonings 

59 Other chronic poisonings 

II. Diseases of the Nervous System and of the Organs of Special Sense 

60-A Lethargic encephalitis (sleeping 

60 Encephalitis 

61-A Simple meningitis 

61-B Cerebrospinal meningitis (undefined) 

61-C Cerebrospinal fever 

62 Locomotor ataxia 

63-A Acute anterior poliomyelitis 

63-B Other diseases of the spinal cord .... 

64 Cerebral hemorrhage, apoplexy 

65 Softening of the brain 

66 Paralysis without specified cause 

67 General paralysis of the insane 

68 Other forms of mental alienation — 

69 Epilepsy 

70 Convulsions (nonpuerperal) 

71 Convulsions of infants 

72 Chorea 



State Board of Health 

TABLE No. 1.— Continued. 



367 



International 
Number 



Causes op Death 



Total 



Rate 



73 Neuralgia and neuritis 

74 Other diseases of the nervous system 

75 Diseases of the eyes and their annexa 

76 Diseases of the ears 

III. Diseases op the Circulatory System 

77 Pericarditis 

78 Acute endocarditis 

79 Organic disease of the heart 

80 Angina pectora 

81 Diseases of the arteries, antheroma, aneurysm 

82 Embolism and thrombosis 

83 Diseases of the veins 

84 Diseases of the lymphatic system 

85 Hemorrhage: other diseases of circulatory system 

IV. Diseases of the Respiratory System 

86 Diseases of the nasal fossae 

87 Diseases of the larynx 

88 Diseases of the thyroid body 

89 Acute bronchitis 

90 Chronic bronchitis 

91 Broncho pneumonia '. 

92-A Lobar pneumonia 

92-B Pneumonia — undefined 

93 Pleurisy 

94 Pulmonary congestion, pulmonary apoplexy 

95 Gangrene of the lung 

96 Asthma 

97 Pulmonary emphysema 

98 Other diseases of the respiratory system 

V. Diseases op the Digestive System 

99 Diseases of the mouth and annexa 

100 Diseases of the pharnyx 

101 Diseases of the oesophagus , 

102 Ulcer of the stomach 

103 Other diseases of the stomach (cancer excepted) 

104 Diarrhoea and enteritis (under 2 years) 

105 Diarrhoea and enteritis (2 years and over) 

107 Intestinal parasites 

108 Appendicitis and typhlitis 

109-A Hernia 

109-B Intestinal obstruction , 

110 Other diseases of the intestines , 

111 Acute yellow atrophy of the liver 

113 Cirrhosis of the liver 

114 Biliary calculi 

115 Other diseases of the liver 

116 Diseases of the spleen .....'. 

117 Simple peritonitis (nonpuerperal) 

118 Other diseases of the digestive system 

VI. Non- Venereal Diseases of the Genito- urinary System and Annexa 

119 Acute nephritis 

120 Bright's disease 

122 Other diseases of the kidneys and annexa 

124 Diseases of the bladder 

125 Diseases of the urethra, urinary abscess, etc 

126 Diseases of the prostate 

128 Uterine hemorrhage (nonpuerperal) 

129 Uterine tumor (noncancerous) 

130 Other diseases of the uterus 

131 Cysts and other tumors of the ovary 

132 Salpingitis and other diseases of female genital organs 

133 Nonpuerperal diseases of breast (cancer excepted) 



23 


.8 


77 


2.6 


3 


.1 


56 


1.9 


5,703 


194.4 


40 


1.3 


214 


7.3 


3,789 


129.3 


335 


11.4 


1,120 


38.2 


160 


5.5 


22 


.8 


14 


.4 


9 


.3 


3,029 


103.3 


8 


.2 


31 


1.1 


74 


2.5 


137 


4.7 


163 


5.6 


1,078 


36.8 


1,029 


35.1 


242 


8.2 


59 


2.0 


74 


2.5 


5 


.2 


69 


2.3 


6 


.2 


54 


1.8 


3,795 


129.3 


27 


.9 


165 


5.6 


3 


.1 


101 


3.4 


426 


14.5 


1,110 


37.9 


438 


14.9 


1 


.03 


402 


13.7 


90 


3.0 


224 


7.6 


98 


3.3 


17 


.6 


196 


6.6 


78 


2.6 


266 


9.1 


4 


.1 


120 


4.1 


29 


1.0 


3,188 


108.6 


318 


10.8 


2,396 


81.4 


97 


3.3 


77 


2.6 


5 


.2 


111 


3.7 


4 


.1 


49 


1.6 


45 


1.5 


21 


.7 


64 


2.1 


1 


.03 



368 



Year Book 

TABLE NO. 1— Continued. 



International 
Number 



Causes of Death 



VII. The Puerperal State 

134 Accidents of pregnancy 

135 Puerperal hemorrhage 

136 Other accidents of labor 

137 Puerperal septicemia 

138 Puerperal albuminuria and convulsions 

139 Puerperal alba dolens, embolus, sudden death 

140 Following childbirth (not otherwise defined) 

VIII. Diseases op the Skin and of the Cellular Tissue 

142 Gangrene 

143 Furuncle 

144 Acute abscess 

145 Other diseases of the skin and annexa 

IX. Diseases of the Bones and of the Organs of Locomotion 

146 Diseases of bones (tuberculosis excepted) 

147 Diseases of the joints (tuberculosis and rheumatism excepted) . . . 
149 Other diseases of the organs of locomotion 

X. Malformations 

150-A Hydrocephalus 

150-B Congenital malformations of the heart 

150-C Other congenital malformations 

XI. Early Infancy 

151-A Premature birth 

151-B Congenital debility, atrophy, marasmus, etc 

152-A Injuries at birth 

152-B Other causes peculiar to early infancy 

153 Lack of care . . ! 

XII. Old Age 

XIII. Affections Produced By External Causes 

TOTAL Suicide 

Accidental 

Homicidal 

155 Suicide by poison 

156 Suicide by asphyxia 

157 Suicide by hanging or strangulation 

158 Suicide by drowning 

159 Suicide by firearms 

160 Suicide by cutting or piercing instruments 

161 Suicide by jumping from high places 

162 Suicide by crushing '. 

163 Other suicides 

164 Poisonings by food 

165 Other acute poisonings 

166 Conflagration 

167 Burns (conflagration excepted) 

168 Absorption of deleterious gases 

169 Accidental drowning 

170 Traumatism by firearms 

171 Traumatism by cutting or piercing instruments 

172 Traumatism by fall 

173-A Traumatism in mines 

173-B Traumatism in quarries 

174 Traumatism by machines 

175-A Railroad accidents and injuries 

175-B Street car accidents and injuries 

175-C Automobile accidents and injuries 

175-D Injuries by other vehicles 

175-E Landslide, other crushings 

175-F Bicycle accidents and injuries 

175-G Motorcycle accidents and injuries 

176 Injuries by animals 



Total 


Rate 


436 


14.8 


42 


1.4 


33 


1.1 


52 


1.7 


183 


6.2 


104 


3.5 


19 


.6 


3 


.1 


145 


4.9 


94 


3.1 


23 


.8 


18 


.6 


10 


.4 


93 


3.1 


76 


2.6 


16 


.6 


1 


.03 


441 


14.9 


42 


'l.4 


308 


10.5 


91 


3.0 


1,917 


65.2 


1,159 


39.6 


283 


9.6 


168 


5.7 


298 


10,1 


9 


.3 


258 


8.8 


2,530 


86.0 


431 


14.6 


1,913 


65.1 


166 


6.3 


116 


3.9 


15 


.5 


70 


2.3 


31 


1.1 


162 


5.5 


23 


.8 


2 


.07 


4 


.1 


8 


.2 


28 


.9 


43 


1.4 


16 


.6 


132 


4.5 


28 


.9 


171 


5.8 


60 


2.0 


9 


.3 


312 


10.6 


60 


2.0 


5 


.2 


23 


.8 


265 


9.0 


17 


.6 


313 


10.7 


32 


1.1 


10 


.4 


3 


1 


16 


.6 


45 


1.5 



State Board of Health 

TABLE NO. 1— Continued. 



369 



International Causes of Death 
Number 


Total 


Rate 


177 Starvation • 


4 

2 

28 

28 

19 

140 
10 
36 
55 

189 

71 

11 
3 

26 
31 


.1 


178 Excessive cold 


.07 


179 Effects of heat 


.9 




.9 




.6 




4.8 




.4 




1.2 




1 9 




6.4 




2 3 




.4 


188 Sudden death 


.1 


189-A Ill-defined 


.9 




1.1 







24— 2297S 



370 



Year Book 



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373 



TABLE NO. 3. 
TOTAL BIRTHS AND DEATHS WITH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION FOR THE FOLLOWING 

CITIES, YEAR 1921 



STATE OF INDIANA 

Rural 

All Cities of 10,000 Population 

Indianapolis 

Ft. Wayne 

Evansville 

South Bend 

Terre Haute 

Gary 

Muncie 

Hammond 

East Chicago 

Anderson 

Kokomo 

Richmond 

Elkhart 

Marion 

New Albany 

Lafayette 

Logansport 

Michigan City 

Vincennes 

Mishawaka 

Laporte 

New Castle 

Huntington 

Peru 

Bloomington 

Frankfort 

Clinton 

Elwood 

Whiting. . .-. 

Crawfordsville 

Jeffersonville 



Births 



Total 



68,247 
36,684 
31,563 



051 
916 
755 
998 
500 
817 
775 
991 
,122 
645 
785 
456 
584 
541 
490 
652 
498 
523 
458 
482 
412 
293 
364 
309 
370 
259 
238 
264 
307 
195 
179 



Rate 



23.3 

22.6 

24.2 

22.4 
22.1 
20.5 
28.1 
22.6 
32.8 
21.2 
27.5 
31.1 
21.6 
26.1 
17.0 
24.0 
22.7 
21.3 
28.9 
23.0 
26.8 
26.6 
31.7 
27.1 
20.2 
26.0 
24.0 
31.9 
22.3 
21.7 
24.4 
30.2 
19.2 
17.7 



Deaths 



Total 



35,134 
18,698 
16,436 

4,118 
977 

1,002 
724 
895 
710 
462 
404 
391 
313 
338 
309 
303 
343 
306 
411 
252 
258 
286 
185 
174 
139 
197 
146 
146 
162 
100 
•141 
107 
152 
119 



Rate 



12.0 
11.5 

12.6 

13.1 
11.3 
11.7 
10.2 
13.5 
12.8 
12.6 
11.2 
10.9 
10.5 
11.2 
11.5 
12.5 
14.4 
13.3 
18.3 
11.7 
13.3 
16.6 
12.2 
11.5 

9.6 
14.1 
11.8 
12.6 
13.9 

9.1 
13.1 
10.5 
14.9 
11.8 



374 



Year Book 



TABLE No. 4 
DEATHS FROM IMPORTANT CAUSES BY OCCUPATION, SEX, COLOR, RURAL AND URBAN 

YEAR 1921 



Occupation 



Agriculture, forestry and animal husbandry 

Extraction of minerals 

Manufacturing and mechanical industries . 

Transportation (all forms) 

Trade (all kinds) of merchants and clerks . 

Public service. 

Professional service 

Domestic and personal service 

Clerical (in offices) 

None given 

By Sex and Color 

Males 

Females 

White 

Colored 

Comparison Rural and Urban 

50 cities, population 1,304,468 

Rate per 100,000 

Balance of State, population 1,626,076. . . . 
Rate per 100,000 

Entire State of Indiana 

Rate per 100,000 



Tubercu- 
losis (All 
forms) 



270 
30 

520 
68 

100 

14 

53 

1,025 

50 

582 



1,325 
1,387 
2,459 
. 253 



1,273 
97.8 



1,439 
88.4 



2,712 
92.7 



Typhoid 
Fever 



7 
100 

5 
123 



182 

178 

345 

15 



152 
11.6 



208 
12.7 



360 
12.3 



Lobar and 
Broncho- 
Pneumonia 



225 
12 

250 
25 
55 
11 
25 

550 

8 

1,176 



1,215 

1,134 

2,179 

170 



1,190 
91.2 



1,159 
71.2 



2,349 
80.2 



Cancer 



415 

11 

325 

49 
120 

14 

40 
1,315 

14 
378 



1,235 
1,446 

2,618 
63 



1,208 
99.5 



1,383 
85.0 



2,681 
91.7 



External 
Causes 



330 

110 

640 

125 

140 

21 

30 

420 

15 



1,905 
625 

2,405 
125 



1,261 
96.9 



1,269 
78.0 



2,530 
86.4 



State Board of Health 



375 



TABLE No. 5 
NUMBER OF BIRTHS AND RATES PER 1,000 POPULATION BY COUNTIES FOR YEAR 1921 



Number 
State of Indiana 68, 247 

Northern Counties 25, 754 

Adams 510 

Allen 2,487 

Benton 279 

Blackford 358 

Carroll 307 

Cass 856 

Dekalb 557 

Elkhart 1,372 

Fulton 344 

Grant 1,171 

Howard 1,107 

Huntington 784 

Jasper 367 

Jay 550 

Kosciusko 621 

Lagrange 255 

Lake 4,747 

Laporte 1,249 

Marshall 566 

Miami 655 

Newton 221 

Noble \ . 472 

Porter 457 

Pulaski 297 

Starke 256 

Steuben 255 

St. Joseph 2,889 



Wells. 
White. 



565 

484 

377 

Whitley 339 

Central Counties 26, 953 



Bartholomew 492 

Boone 515 

Brown 191 

Clay 701 

Clinton 611 

Decatur 315 

Delaware 1, 185 

Fayette 375 

Fountain 424 

Franklin 335 

Hamilton 520 

Hancock 329 

Hendricks 401 

Henry 682 



Rate 
23.3 

24.4 

24.8 
21.7 
22.8 
25.4 
18.8 
22.2 
21.7 
24.3 
20.8 
22. 8 
25.1 
24.7 
26.2 
23.5 
22.8 
18.2 
29.6 
24.7 
23.8 
22.8 
21.7 
21.0 
22.5 
23.9 
24.9 
19.0 
27.9 
20.7 
23.5 
21.7 
21.6 

22.1 

20.5 
21.8 
27.2 
23.8 
22.0 
17.6 
22.0 
21.8 
22.5 
22.6 
21.4 
19.1. 
19.2 
19.6 



Central Counties — Continued 

Number 

Johnson 443 

Madison 1 1 586 

Marion 7, 767 

Monroe 730 

Montgomery 548 

Morgan 488 

Owen 274 

Parke 369 

Putnam 421 

Randolph 597 

Rush 429 

Shelby 530 

Tippecanoe 984 

Tipton 370 

Union 124 

Vermillion 634 

Vigo 2,383 

Warren 239 

Wayne 961 

Southern Counties 15, 540 



Clark .... 
Crawford. 
Daviess . . 
Dearborn. 
Dubois. . . 
Floyd. . . . 
Gibson. . . 
Greene. . . 
Harrison . 
Jackson . . 
Jefferson . 
Jennings . . 

Knox . 

Lawrence. 

Martin 

Ohio 

Orange — 

Perry 

Pike 



Ripley 

Scott 

Spencer 

Sullivan 

Switzerland. . 
Vanderburgh. 

Warrick 

Washington.. 



548 
254 
701 
455 
442 
646 
683 
854 
437 
590 
422 
291 
,201 
866 
314 



434 
476 
458 
403 
156 
435 
870 
195 
,088 
485 
376 



Rate 
21.3 
22.9 

22.3 
29.7 
19.2 
24.3 
21.4 
19.5 
21.2 
22.5 
21.7 
20.3 
22.9 
22.9 
20.6 
22.9 
23.7 
25.6 
19.9 

23.6 

18.6 

22.6 

26.4 

22.7 

22.1 

21.0 

23.3 

23.2, 

22^8 

24.3 

20.3 

21.8 

25.9 

30.6 

26.4 

19.8 

22.3 

26.0 

25.4 

23.6 

21.5 

21.0 

23.6 

27.5 

20.9 

22.6 

24.4 

22.5 



376 



Year Book 



TABLE No. 6 
NUMBER OF DEATHS AND RATES PER 1,000 POPULATION BY COUNTIES FOR YEAR 1921 



Number 
State of Indiana 35, 134 



Northern Counties 12,024 



Adams. .. 
Allen .... 
Benton. . . 
Blackford . 
Carroll. . . 



183 
1,243 
105 
158 
146 
525 
273 
673 
199 
700 
505 



Dekalb 

Elkhart 

Fulton 

Grant 

Howard 

Huntington 412 

Jasper 141 

Jay 272 

Kosciusko 290 

Lagrange 137 

Lake 1,847 

Laporte 598 

Marshall 260 

Miami 333 

Newton 108 

Noble 265 

Porter 240 

Pulaski 130 

Starke 137 

Steuben 157 

St. Joseph 1,114 

Wabash 287 

Wells 237 

White 174 

Whitley 175 



Central Counties. 

Bartholomew 

Boone 

Brown 

Clay 

Clinton 

Decatur... 

Delaware 

Fayette 

Fountain 

Franklin 

Hamilton 

Hancock 

Hendricks 

Henry 



15, 



319 
285 
106 
364 
337 
223 
671 
208 
198 
184 
288 
231 
229 
394 



Rate 
12.0 



11.4 



10.9 
8.6 
11.2 
8.9 
13.6 
10.7 
11.9 
12.1 
13.6 
11.5 
13.0 
10.1 
11.7 
10.7 
9.8 
11.5 
11.9 
10.9 
11.6 
10.6 
11.8 
11.8 
10.5 
13.3 
11.8 
10.8 
10.5 
11.6 
10.0 
11.2 

12.6 

13.4 
12.1 
15.1 
12.4 
12.1 
12.5 
11.9 
12.1 
10.5 
12.4 
11.9 
13.4 
10.8 
11.4 



Central Counties— Continued 

Number 

Johnson 272 

Madison 762 

Marion 4, 582 

Monroe 246 

Montgomery 360 

Morgan 254 

Owen 144 

Parke 262 

Putnam 234 

Randolph 313 

Rush 242 

Shelby 280 

Tippecanoe 709 



Tipton. . . . 

Union 

Vermillion. 

Vigo 

Warren . . . 
Wayne 



216 

70 

312 

1,277 

106 

711 



Southern Counties 7, 721 



Clark 
Crawford. 



Dearborn. 
Dubois. . . 
Floyd. . . . 
Gibson. . . 
Greene. . . 
Harrison . 
Jackson . . 
Jefferson . 
Jennings . 

Knox 

Lawrence. 
Martin. . . 

Ohio 

Orange. . . 

Perry 

Pike 



Ripley 

Scott 

Spencer 

Sullivan 

Switzerland 

Vanderburgh 1 

Warrick. 

Washington 



314 
126 
317 
208 
196 
380 
327 
430 
177 
303 
366 
139 
605 
393 
132 

45 
197 
141 
221 
182 
197 

83 
191 
371 

93 
204 
226 
157 



Rate 
13.1 
11.0 
13.2 
10.0 
12.6 
12.7 
11.3 
13.9 
11.8 
11.8 
12.6 
10.8 
16.6 
13.4 
11.6 
11.3 
12.7 
10.9 
14.8 

11.7 

10.7 
11.2 
11.8 
10.4 

9.8 
12.4 
11.2 
11.7 

9.5 
12.5 
17.7 
10.5 
13.1 
13.9 
11.1 
11.2 
11.6 

8.4 
11.8 

9.4 
10.5 
11.2 
10.4 
11*. 7 

9.9 
13.0 
11.4 

9.4 



State Board of Health 



177 



TABLE No. 7 
MARRIAGES INJINDIANA (BY COUNTIES) DURING1YEARS 1918, 1919, 1920 AND 1921 



Counties 1921 1920 1919 1918 

State Total 36,641 42,636 37,884 29,824 



180 188 



Allen 1,085 



Bartholomew 

Benton 

Blackford . . . 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Cass 

Clark.. 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford.. . . 

Daviess 

Dearborn — 

Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware. . . . 

Dubois 

Elkhart 

Fayette 

Floyd 

Fountain .... 
Franklin .... 

Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant 

Greene. . 

Hamilton — 
Hancock .... 
Harrison .... 
Hendricks . . . 

Henry 

Howard ..... 
Huntington. . 

Jackson 

Jasper 

JSo 



Jennings . . 
Johnson. . . 

Knox 

Kosciusko . 
Lagrange. . 
Lake 



221 
81 
108 
187 
50 
127 
337 
,699 
391 
269 
112 
221 



183 
625 
153 
553 
151 
383 
256 
99 
106 
280 
532 
351 
228 
228 
114 
191 
240 
452 
243 
192 
244 
174 
238 
110 
274 
537 
110 



1,322 
279 
105 
151 
205 
59 
146 
473 

3,448 
464 
350 
117 
289 
260 
173 
203 
798 
174 
604 
225 
493 
310 
122 
136 
306 
623 
382 
246 
254 
110 
182 
394 
619 
318 
168 
148 
217 
239 
131 
250 
706 
230 
126 



1,149 
268 
100 
122 
235 
41 
174 
400 

3,255 
418 
317 
132 
284 
221 
198 
221 
672 
150 

. 606 
157 
479 
243 
99 
145 
590 
628 
390 
232 
227 
142 
144 
401 
596 
287 
193 
122 
233 
240 
117 
233 
580 
250 
125 

3,786 



125 
791 
195 

83 

96 
157 

47 
133 
310 
3,121 
350 
210 

79 
186 
202 
124 
141 
463 

81 
437 
103 
352 
207 

77 
106 
223 
466 
304 
190 
174 
114 

98 
258 
330 
127 
123 

88 
184 
171 



416 
169 



4,028 



COUNTTES 1921 

Laporte 256 

Lawrence 325 

Madison 698 

Marion 4,450 



Marshall .... 

Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery. 

Morgan 

Newton 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 

Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph . . . 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke ; 

Steuben 

St. Joseph... 

Sullivan 

Switzerland.. 
Tippecanoe . . 

Tipton 

Union 



195 
110 
262 
303 
279 
210 

71 
156 

54 
149 
116 
148 
201 
167 
362 
275 
104 
217 
228 
128 
144 
113 
268 
384 

90 

67 

.. 1,308 

306 

54 
454 
165 

31 
Vanderburgh 1 , 257 



Vermillion. . 

Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington. 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley. . . . 



167 
1,548 
235 
94 
171 
140 
866 
174 
146 
115 



1920 
668 
361 
859 
5,564 
190 
109 
334 
279 
304 
267 
97 
195 
53 
152 
133 
171 
176 
161 
349 
319 
123 
214 
266 
138 
209 
109 
317 
395 
90 
112 

1,412 
345 
52 
492 
179 
43 

1,489 
173 

1,720 
266 
96 
189 
115 
525 
222 
142 
119 



1919 

592 

302 

680 

4,784 

228 

87 

279 

280 

273 

230 

66 

161 

67 

170 

125 

154 

212 

162 

281 

143 

121 

203 

270 

141 

188 

103 

260 

335 

87 

96 

1,228 

322 

52 

459 

169 

45 

1,254 

196 

1,585 

275 

99 

205 

129 

508 

183 

153 

141 



1918 
390 
194 
604 
3,690 
181 

69 
214 
183 
215 
131 

54 
134 

45 
117 
103 
114 
138 
107 
307 
223 

90 
170 
200 

78 
127 

58 
211 
258 
114 
103 , 
770 
218 

51 
399 
118 

42 
915 
248 
1,371 
183 

76 
182 
148 
359 
130 
115 

75 



378 



Year Book 



TABLE No. 8 
DEATHS FROM TUBERCULOSIS (ALL FORMS), 1921 



State . 



White. . . 
Colored . 



Northern Counties. 

Adams 

Allen 

Benton 

Blackford 

Carroll 



Dekalb 

Elkhart 

Fulton 

Grant 

Howard .... 
Huntington. 

Jasper 

Jay 

Kosciusko . . 
Lagrange. . . 

Lake 

Laporte .... 
Marshall 

Miami 

Newton .... 

Noble 

Porter 

Pulaski 

Starke 

Steuben 

St. Joseph. . 
Wabash.. . 



White. . . 
Whitley. 



Central Counties . 

Bartholomew 

Boone 

Brown 

Clay 

Clinton 

Decatur 

Delaware 

Fayette 

Fountain 

Franklin 

Hamilton 

Hancock 



Total 
2,712 
1,325 
1,387 
2,459 
253 

783 

11 

121 

5 



117 
30 
13 
22 

5 
14 

4 

2 
11 

4 

103 

15 

13 



1,243 



Rate 
92.7 



74.2 

53.7 
105.9 

40.9 
56.8 
55.2 
75.3 
66.4 
85.1 

109.2 
93.5 
79.6 
69.5 
57.3 
68.6 
58.9 
57.1 
73.1 
59.5 
54.8 
76.7 
49.3 
62.3 
19.7 
16.1 

107.0 
29.9 
99.7 
54.9 
63.3 
46.1 
19.2 

102.1 

100.4 

131.5 

128.7 

71.3 

82.9 

89.8 

118.8 

122.5 

58.4 

162.1 

66.1 

127.8 



Central Counties — Continued 

Hendricks 

Henry 

Johnson 

Madison 

Marion 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Owen 

Parke 

Putnam 

Randolph 

Rush 

Shelby 

Tippecanoe 

Tipton.. 

Union 

Vermillion 

Vigo 

Warren 

Wayne 

Southern 'Counties 



ital 


Rate 


19 


93.6 


30 


86.5 


13 


62.7 


60 


86.7 


160 


132.2 


19 


77.5 


30 


105.3 


15 


74.9 


13 


101.8 


22 


116.6 


18 


90.5 


24 


90.6 


18 


93.6 


28 


107.8 


44 


102.8 


10 


61.9 


4 


66.4 


21 


76.2 


71 


70.8 


6 


61.9 



33 



Clark 37 

Crawford 18 

Daviess 34 

Dearborn 20 

Dubois 20 

Floyd 26 

Gibson 14 

Greene 44 

Harrison 18 

Jackson 24 

Jefferson 36 

Jennings 13 

Knox . 38 

Lawrence 37 

Martin 10 

Ohio 2 

Orange 25 

Perry 16 

Pike 14 

Posey 15 

Ripley 9 

Scott 12 

Spencer 17 

Sullivan 24 

Switzerland 9 

Vanderburgh 126 

Warrick 16 

Washington 12 



104.4 

125.9 
160.7 
126.6 
100.0 
100.4 
84.8 
47.9 
119.7 
96.4 
99.1 
173.8 
97.9 
82.2 
131.1 
84.3 
49.7 
147.3 
95.9 
74.9 
77.6 
48.1 
161.6 
92.4 
75.8 
96.7 
136.5 
80.6 
72.1 



State Board of Health 



379 



TABLE No. 9 
DEATHS FROM TYPHOID FEVER (ALL FORMS), 1921 



State . . . 
Males. . . 
Females . 
White. . . 
Colored . 



Northern Counties. 



Allen.... 
Benton. .. 
Blackford . 
Carroll . . . 



Dekalb 

Elkhart 

Fulton 

Grant 

Howard 
Huntington. 

Jasper 

Jay 

Kosciusko . . 
Lagrange. . . 

Lake 

Laporte .... 
Marshall . . . 

Miami 

Newton 

Noble 

Porter 

Pulaski .... 

Starke 

Steuben 

St. Joseph . . 
Wabash .... 

Wells 

White 

Whitley. . . . 



Central Counties 



Bartholomew . 

Boone 

Brown 

Clay 

Clinton 

Decatur 

Delaware — 

Fayette 

Fountain. . . . 

Franklin 

Hamilton. . . . 
Hancock .... 



Total 
360 
182 
178 
345 
15 

107 

4 
19 
1 



Rate 
12.3 



10.1 

19.5 
16.6 

8.2 

6.1 

15.6 
3.9 
8.8 
6.1 
7.8 

15.9 
6.3 

14.3 
4.3 

11.1 

13.8 

9.9 

21.1 



16.1 



4.8 
14.7 



19.2 

11.0 

16.7 
4.2 
28.5 
10.2 
14.4 

10.6 



6.7 
4.1 
11.6 



Central Counties— Continued 

Hendricks 

Henry 

Johnson 

Madison 

Marion 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Owen 

Parke 

Putnam 

Randolph 

Rush 

Shelby 

Tippecanoe 

Tipton 

Union '. 

Vermillion 

Vigo 

Warren 

Wayne * 

Southern Counties 



Clark 

CrawforcL- . . 
Daviess .'™ . . 
Dearborn. . . . 

Dubois 

Floyd 

Gibson 

Greene 

Harrison .... 

Jackson 

Jefferson .... 
Jennings .... 

Knox 

Lawrence. . . . 

Martin 

Ohio 

Orange 

Perry 

Pike 

Posey 

Ripley - 

Scott 

Spencer 

Sullivan 

Switzerland. . 
Vanderburgh. 

Warrick 

Washington. . 



Total 
2 
5 
2 
10 
28 
6 
4 
3 
3 
4 
2 
3 
2 
3 
5 



119 

3 
5 

8 
1 
4 
3 
2 

11 
1 
7 
1 
2 

22 



Rate 
9.9 
14.4 
9.6 
14.5 
8.0 
24.5 
14.0 
14.9 
23.5 
21.2 
10.0 
11.3 
10.4 
11.5 
11.7 
37.1 

18.1 
7.9 
10.3 



16.6 

10.2 
44.6 
29.8 
5.0 
20.0 



29.9 
5.4 
28.9 
4.8 
15.1 
47.6 
31.9 
33.7 

11.8 
23.9 
21.4 
10.3 
10.7 
26.9 
5.4 
9.5 



12.0 



380 



Year Book 



TABLE No. 10 
DEATHS FROM CANCER (ALL FORMS), 1921 



Total 

State 2,681 

Males 1,235 

Females 1,446 

White 2,618 

Colored 63 



Northern Counties. 



Adams 

Allen 

Benton 

Blackford . . 

Carroll 

Cass 

Dekalb 

Elkhart 

Fulton 

Grant 

Howard .... 
Huntington. 

Jasper 

Jay 

Kosciusko . . 
Lagrange. . . 

Lake 

Laporte .... 
Marshall . . . 

Miami 

Newton .... 

Noble 

Porter 

Pulaski .... 

Starke 

Steuben .... 
St. Joseph . . 

Wabash 

Wells 

White 

Whitley.... 



Bartholomew . 

Boone 

Brown 

Clay 

Clinton 

Decatur 

Delaware 

Fayette 

Fountain .... 
Franklin .... 

Hamilton 

Hancock 



937 

10 
119 

7 

4 
15 
35 
24 
72 
17 
42 
37 
33 
14 
21 
33 
16 
94 
53 
19 
21 

8 
27 
15 
13 
11 
14 
96 
21 
19 

8 
19 



Central Counties 1, 187 



Rate 
91.7 



88.7 

48.7 

104.1 

57.3 

28.4 

91.9 

90.8 

93.7 

127.6 

103.1 

81.7 

84.1 

104.1 

100.2 

90.0 

121.6 

114.2 

58.7 

105.0 

80.0 

73.2 

78.8 

120.1 

74.0 

104.9 

107.0 

104.7 

92.9 

77.1 

92.6 

39.0 

121.4 

97.4 

100.4 
67.8 
71.2 
91.6 
97.3 

101.0 
94.0 
75.8 
74.3 
54.0 
66.0 

122.0 



Central Counties— Continued 



Hendricks . . . 

Henry 

Johnson 

Madison 

Marion 

Monroe 

Montgomery . 

Morgan 

Owen 

Parke 

Putnam 

Randolph . . . 

Rush 

Shelby 

Tippecanoe. . 

Tipton 

Union 

Vermillion. . . 

Vigo 

Warren 

Wayne 



Southern Counties. 

Clark 

Crawford. . 

Daviess 

Dearborn 

Dubois 

Floyd 

Gibson 

Greene 

Harrison 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Jennings 

Knox 

Lawrence 

Martin 

Ohio 

Orange 

Perry 

Pike 

Posey 

Ripley 

Scott 

Spencer 

Sullivan 

Switzerland 

Vanderburgh 

Warrick 

Washington 



Total 
20 
34 
19 
70 
367 
18 
33 
20 
12 
18 
11 
29 
27 
24 
57 
22 
6 
19 
70 



557 

29 
10 
35 
12 

9 
42 
25 
25 
11 
17 
28 

9 
34 
31 

5 

1 
17 

8 
15 
16 
19 

5 
15 
23 

3 
88 
14 
11 



Rate 

98.5 

98.0 

91.6 

101.2 

105.4 

73.4 

115.8 

99.9 

94.0 

95.3 

55.3 

109.5 

140.3 

92.3 

133.1 

136.2 

99.6 

68.9 

69.8 

92.7 

124.6 

84.7 

98.7 
89.2 

130.3 
60.0 
45.1 

136.9 
85.6 
68.0 
58.9 
70.2 

135.2 
67.7 
73.5 

109.8 
42.1 
24.8 

100.1 
47.9 
80.2 
82.7 

101.6 
67.3 
81.5 
72.7 
32.2 
95.3 
70.4 
66.0 



State Board of Health 



381 



TABLE No. 11 
DEATHS FROM ALL CAUSES (ABRIDGED) FIVE YEARS COMPARISON 



1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


35, 134 


39,430 


37,077 


46,361 


360 


282 


338 


298 


21 


15 


12 


24 


71 


286 


70 


120 


154 


198 


79 


117 


348 


261 


64 


469 


700 


358 


320 


428 


311 


2,290 


2,929 


6,301 


2,254 


2,659 


2,780 


3,408 


458 


492 


488 


561 


206 


189 


206 


244 


2,681 


2,592 


2,518 


2,558 


196 


202 


186 


205 


4,350 


4,403 


4,226 


4,374 


4,378 


4,370 


4,102 


4,873 


1,120 


1,213 


1,024 


1,109 


300 


331 


307 


300 


2,349 


4,150 


3,348 


5,640 


426 


460 


463 


522 


1,110 


1,032 


1,028 


1,240 


438 


357 


376 


444 


196 


215 


217 


265 


266 


237 


226 


253 


2,714 


2,951 


2,789 


2,791 


474 


478 


440 


459 


436 


485 


428 


525 


145 


152 


135 


136 


93 


72 


58 


62 


441 


444 


419 


468 


1,917 


1,983 


1,704 


1,824 


258 


416 


340 


296 


431 


327 


364 


339 


1,913 


1,968 


1,804 


2,198 


186 


135 


130 


109 


70 


109 


67 


69 



1917 



Total Deaths from all Causes 

Typhoid fever 

Smallpox 

Measles 

Scarlet fever 

Whooping cough 

Diphtheria and croup 

Influenza 

Pulmonary tuberculosis 

Other forms tuberculosis 

Syphilis 

Cancer and other malignant tumors 

Acute and chronic rheumatism 

Diseases of the nervous system and of the organs of special sense 

Organic heart disease (all forms) 

Diseases of the arteries (arterio sclerosis) 

Acute and chronic bronchitis 

Pneumonia 

Diseases of the stomach (cancer excepted) 

Diarrhoea and enteritis (under 2 years) 

Diarrhoea and enteritis (over 2 years) 

Cirrhosis of the liver 

Other diseases of the liver 

Acute nephritis and Bright's disease 

Non-venereal diseases of the genito-urinary system and annexa . 

The puerperal state 

Diseases of the skin and of the cellular tissue 

Diseases of the bones and of the organs of locomotion 

Malformations 

Early infancy 

Senility 

Suicides 

Accidental deaths 

Homicides 

Unknown or ili-defined diseases 



39, 785 

497 
14 
550 
143 
251 
44 
565 

3,435 
545 
282 

2,542 
160 

4,312 

5,160 
910 
424 

3,714 
448 

1,478 
399 
369 
181 

3,180 
399 
414 
110 
67 
543 

1,828 
230 
423 

2,401 
194 
24 



382 



Year Book 



TABLE No. 12 

TUBERCULOSIS (All Forms) 

Deaths by Months With Comparison for 10 Years 



Months 



1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


2,712 


3J51 


3,268 


3,969 


3,980 


3,824 


4,021 


4,077 


4,100 


92.7 


107.7 


110.8 


136.3 


137.4 


133.2 


141.9 


145.5 


147.7 


243 


297 


346 


323 


338 


| 333 


372 


328 


371 


218 


366 


319 


350 


373 


,341 


361 


375 


332 


278 


315 


324 


420 


414 


410 


418 


397 


427 


250 


328 


315 


' 461 


388 


373 


383 


398 


392 


284 


311 


329 


361 


388 


,359 


403 


389 


397 


226 


253 


243 


336 


348 


339 


322' 


337 


339 


224 


244 


276 


287 


273 


293 


308 


335 


341 


190 


223 


220 


277 


317 


276 


291 


301 


328 


182 


196 


208 


250 


263 


257 


272 


317 


281 


198 


211 


221 


283 


304 


286 


281 


304 


296 


214 


197 


206 


294 


257 


266 


278 


276 


297 


205 


210 


261 


327 


317 


291 


332 


320 


299 



1912 



Total 

Rate per 100,000 Pop 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



4,148 

147.8 

376 
388 
452 
297 
375 
303 
318 
286 
269 
393 
280 
311 



TUBERCULOSIS (All Forms) 
Deaths by Ages With Comparison for 10 Years 



Ages 



Under 1 year. . . 

1 year 

2 years 

3 years 

4 years 

5 to 9 years . . 
10 to 14 years. . 
15 to 19 years. . 
20 to 24 years. . 
25 to 29 years.. 
30 to 34 years.. 
35 to 39 years. . 
40 to 44 years. . 
45 to 49 years. . 
50 to 54 years . . 
55 to 59 years. . 
60 to 64 years . . 
65 to 69 years. . 
70 to 74 years . . 
75 to 79 years. . 
80 to 89 years. 
90 years and ov 



1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


65 


71 


42 


64 


87 


89 


73 


104 


133 


38 


44 


31 


55 


88 


66 


74 


70 


88 


13 


20 


32 


19 


24 


24 


42 


46 


27 


13 


19 


21 


13 


15 


19 


21 


26 


26 


5 


14 


11 


7 


17 


18 


23 


15 


22 


28 


49 


35 


68 


59 


66 


64 


61 


82 


43 


62 


68 


90 


84 


91 


77 


72 


83 


217 


284 


287 


322 


285 


292 


307 


261 


293 


333 


400 


402 


509 


474 


458 


470 


487 


479 


312 


371 


415 


506 


472 


479 


498 


489 


485 


269 


295 


323 


361 


375 


380 


409 


467 


433 


227 


295 


318 


344 


358 


348 


352 


335 


355 


198 


203 


224 


304 


283 


253 


296 


290 


282 


168 


203 


194 


259 


270 


216 


234 


235 


231 


157 


168 


159 


193 


201 


190 


260 


246 


239 


153 


143 


181 


185 


221 


197 


204 


221 


193 


145 


137 


146 


173 


168 


163 


190 


171 


189 


122 


155 


142 


176 


198 


204 


156 


196 


163 


108 


99 


98 


138 


174 


151 


134 


150 


152 


59 


86 


83 


75 


93 


60 


89 


81 


103 


36 


30 


55 


49 


25 


55 


32 


45 


45 


3 


3 


1 


3 


9 


4 


16 


9 


4 



1912 



143 

79 

46 

35 

11 

67 

89 

267 

511 

549 

410 

340 

283 

204 

211 

171 

167 

193 

141 



State Board of Health 



383 



TABLE No. 13 

PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS 

Deaths by Months With Comparison for 10 Years 



Months 



Total 

Rate per 100,000 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


2,254 


2,659 


2,780 


3,408 


3,435 


3,259 


3,444 


3,471 


3,473 


76.8 


90.9 


94.3 


117.0 


118.8 


113.8 


121.8 


124.1 


124.1 


202 


254 


306 


282 


304 


297 


326 


289 


323 


174 


328 


280 


297 


327 


312 


314 


340 


289 


235 


280 


281 


365 


366 


355 


371 


339 


372 


199 


286 


277 


394 


335 


318 


319 


342 


349 


233 


265 


278 


301 


355 


306 


344 


323 


325 


195 


206 


211 


291 


279 


281 


269 


292 


288 


190 


199 


216 


242 


239 


242 


272 


283 


283 


160 


188 


177 


230 


261 


217 


241 


254 


274 


156 


154 


177 


202 


223 


213 


248 


259 


232 


149 


159 


183 


245 


250 


241 


249 


261 


235 


183 


165 


173 


260 


217 


229 


241 


234 


243 


178 


175 


221 


299 


279 


248 


280 


265 


260 



1912 



3,364 

125.2 

318 

333 

385 

321 1 

322 

252 

270 

244 

196 

234 

226 

263 



• PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS 
Deaths bt Ages With Comparison for 10 Years 



Under 1 year 

1 year 

2 years 

3 years 

4 years 

5 to 9 years — 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years — 
20 to 24 years... 
25 to 29 years. . . 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 39 years 

40 to [ ± years — 
45 to 49 years — 

50 to 54 years 

55 to 59 years 

60 to 64 years 

65 to 69 years 

70 to 74 years... 
75 to 79 years... 
80 to 89 years... 
90 years and over 



1921 1920 1919 1918 1917 1916 1915 



16 
17 

5 

1 

1 

12 

31 

184 

298 

279 

234 

202 

175 

145 

135 

126 

125 

95 

91 

49 

31 

2 



31 
21 
5 

H 

21 

39 

250 

360 

345 

260 

270 

175 

165 

145 

115 

120 

135 

90 

75 

26 

3 



18 
6 

7 

n 

17 
45 

254 

375 

380 

280 

288 

200 

159 

137 

156 

120 

125 

86 

73 

42 

1 



29 
21 
14 
13 

27 

61 

282 

447 

475 

329 

312 

225 

202 

175 

159 

150 

148 

122 

66 

43 

3 



35 

22 

12 

11 

5 

24 

54 

|255 

t435 

[431 

I 350 

325 

243 

252 

199 

170 

151 

169 

145 

95 

44 



20 

II 

F9 

32 

63 

261 

405 

445 

354 

312 

232 

189 

170 

166 

135 

184 

131 

50 

50 

2 



34 
27 
15 

f? 

28 
51 
264 
433 
452 
369 
325 
270 
210 
228 
180 
168 
146 
112 
78 
40 



1914 



45 

15 

14 

7 

10 

23 

49 

230 

449 

452 

426 

305 

263 

201 

221 

200 

148 

171 

130 

67 

39 

6 



1913 



55 

34 

11 

11 

7 

41 

56 

260 

439 

455 

381 

320 

249 

207 

201 

169 

156 

136 

126 

86 

37 

4 



1912 



53 
32 
16 
7 
4 

29 

57 

229 

451 

507 

370 

301 

253 

186 

183 

147 

141 

160 

116 

72 

47 

4 



384 



Year Book 



TABLE No. 14 

TYPHOID FEVER 

Deaths by Months With Comparison for 10 Years 



Months 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


1912 


Total 


360 
12.3 

17 

21 

9 

6 

7 

13 

43 

73 

59 

60 

30 

22 


282 

9.6 

16 
19 
14 
9 
18 
21 
21 
32 
35 
41 
30 
26 


338 

11.5 

12 
20 
21 
16 
19 
21 
29 
42 
51 
42 
50 
15 


398 

13.7 

19 
16 
24 
26 
20 
23 
23 
48 
48 
77 
45 
29 


497 

17.1 

36 
28 
22 
18 
22 
23 
33 
64 
98 
70 
49 
34 


604 

21.1 

28 
32 
36 
40 
28 
16 
38 
86 
122 
96 
45 
37 


415 

14.6 

35 
23 
29 
20 
16 
17 
19 
48 
59 
55 
56 
38 


591 

21.1 

38 
39 
44 
38 
22 
32 
37 
69 
71 
78 
78 
45 


701 

25 3 

27 
27 
27 
28 
33 
26 
48 

116 
97 

125 
90 
57 


652 


Rate per 100,000 Pop ... . 


23.8 
29 




42 




42 




33 




35 




30 


July 


33 




70 




102 




109 


November 


81 
46 







TYPHOID FEVER 
Deaths by Ages With Comparison for 10 Years 



Ages 



Under 1 

1 year. 

2 years 

3 years 

4 years 

5 to 9 
10 to 14 
15 to 19 
20 to 24 
25 to 29 
30 to 34 
35 to 39 
40 to 44 
45 to 49 
50 to 54 
55 to 59 
60 to 64 
65 to 69 
70 to 74 
75 to 79 
80 to 90 
90 years 



year. 



years .... 
years .... 
years .... 

years 

years 

years 

years. . . . 

years 

years 

years 

years 

years 

years 

years 

years 
years 
and over . 



1921 1920 1919 1918 1917 



1916 



1915 



1914 



1913 



7 
12 
12 
11 
12 
61 
54 
97 
104 
59 
51 
48 
38 
28 
26 
19 
19 
14 
16 
7 
5 
1 



1912 



State Board of Health 



385 



TABLE No. 15 
DIPHTHERIA AND CROUP 

Deaths by Months with Comparison for 10 Years 



Months 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


1912 


Total 


700 

23.9 

46 
37 
30 
38 
23 
25 
29 
24 
71 
151 
130 
96 


358 

12.2 

42 
26 
24 
22 
25 
11 
16 
9 

18 
50 
48 
67 


320 

10.9 

37 
26 
34 
21 
20 
20 
20 
15 
17 
29 
44 
37 


428 

14.7 

64 
45 
43 
47 
25 
14 
21 
24 
31 
35 
40 
39 


444 

15.3 

46 
33 
30 
34 
24 
20 
24 
22 
33 
64 
52 
62 


386 

13.5 

40 
24 
18 
21 
10 
10 
5 
19 
40 
66 
69 
64 


302 

10.6 

33 
30 
21 
14 
8 
11 
17 
10 
23 
43 
47 
45 


385 

13.7 

46 
41 
35 
21 
21 
13 
11 
21 
28 
39 
52 
57 


516 

18.7 

70 
53 
27 
22 
33 
23 
21 
37 
44 
59 
76 
51 


518 


Rate per 100,000 populat'n 


18.9 
25 




29 




25 




19 




19 




17 


July 


10 




25 




68 




107 




106 




78 







DIPHTHERIA AND CROUP 
Deaths by Ages with Comparision for 10 Years 



Ages 



Under 1 year . . 

1 year 

2 years 

3 years 

4 years 

5 to 9 years. 
10 to 14 years. 
15 to 19 years. 
20 to 24 years. 
25 to 29 years. 
30 to 34 years. 
35 to 39 years. 
40 to 44 years. 
45 to 4" years. 
50 to 54 years. 
55 to 59 years . 
60 to 64 years. 
65 to 69 years. 
70 to 79 years. 



1921 1920 1919 1918 1917 1916 1915 



25 



77 

75 

210 

80 



17 

33 

28 

44 

27 

128 

47 

10 

6 

5 

1 

5 

1 

1 



31 

28 

36 

37 

107 

39 

12 

3 

7 



22 
49 
48 
49 
45 
132 
35 
12 



10 

34 

53 

47 

48 

111 

62 

15 

11 

9 

3 

1 

5 

2 



19 

41 

45 

46 

37 

119 

43 

13 

9 

5 

3 

4 



13 

30 

33 

34 

25 

104 

36 

13 

3 

1 

4 

1 



1914 



27 

42 

55 

35 

35 

135 

35 

9 

1 

2 

3 

1 



1913 



26 
47 
53 
61 
44 
170 
67 
20 



1912 



23 

61 

63 

55 

52 

167 

52' 

11 

14 

7 

7 

3 

2 



26—22978 



386 



Year Book 



TABLE No. 16. 

SCARLET FEVER 

Deaths by Months with Comparison for. 10 Years 



Months 



1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


154 


198 


79 


117 


144 


96 


102 


114 


199 


5.2 


6.6 


2.7 


4.0 


4.9 


3.3 


3.6 


4.0 


7.1 


26 


18 


7 


25 


13 


13 


14 


18 


15 


18 


41 


10 


17 


15 


14 


10 


7 


22 


20 


29 


15 


18 


17 


11 


19 


10 


36 


16 


16 


7 


18 


18 


14 


15 


21 


26 


12 


22 


11 


10 


25 


7 


4 


4 


21 


8 


11 


4 


7 


12 


4 


2 


5 


18 


7 


8 


1 




5 


1 


1 


4 


5 


4 


4 


3 


5 


2 


1 


2 




7 


5 


2 


4 


3 


4 


9 


3 


6 


8 


9 


12 


4 


3 


8 


4 


7 


9 


13 


17 


19 


4 


6 


12 


7 


12 


9 


13 


12 


16 


9 


5 


13 


11 


13 


21 


15 



1912 



Total 

Rate per 100,000 populat' 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October.... 

Novemoer 

December 



113 

4.1 

7 
14 
7 
15 
4 
4 
4 
5 
5 
10 
14 
24 



SCARLET FEVER 
Deaths by Ages with Comparison for 10 Years 



Ages 



Under 1 year.. 

1 year 

[ 2 years 

3 years 

4 years 

5 to 9 years. 
10 to 14 years. 
15 to 19 years. 
20 to 24 years. 
25 to 29 years. 
30 to 34 years. 
35 to 44 years. 
45 to 54 years. 
55 to 90 years. 



1921 1920 1919 1918 1917 1916 1915 



27 



1914 



12 


10 


4 


5 


2 






5 


1 


1 


J 


3 



1913 



1912 



State Board op Health 



387 



TABLE No. 17. 
MEASLES 
Deaths by Months with Comparison for 10 Years 



Months 



















*■* 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


71 


286 


70 


120 


550 


204 


69 


151 


461 


2.4 


9.8 


2.4 


4.1 


19.0 


7.1 


2.4 


5.4 


16.6 


8 


17 


5 


10 


32 


12 


3 


10 


26 


12 


47 


8 


12 


75 


24 


5 


16 


55 


18 


67 


14 


20 


140 


26 


6 


24 


87 


15 


61 


15 


29 


154 


45 


13 


29 


103 


7 


60 


11 


26 


92 


38 


13 


28 


92 


5 


23 


5 


13 


36 


29 


8 


20 


55 


1 


4 


1 


2 


12 


13 


2 


7 


16 


1 
1 






1 
1 


J 


1 
2 


1 


- 4 


12 
2 


2 


1 


1 




1 


1 


2 


3 


2 


4 


1 


1 


2 


4 


3 


2 


5 


6 


6 


3 


1 


.3 


5 


2 


3 


5 


10 


2 


9 



1912 



Total 

Rate per 100,000 populat'n 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



73 

2.6 



12 



MEASLES 
Deaths by Ages with Comparison for 10 Years 



Ages 



1921 1920 1919 1918 1917 1916 1915 



1914 



1913 



1912 



Under 1 

1 year. 

2 years 

3 years 
4year8 
5 to 9 

10 to 14 
15 to 19 
20 to 24 
25 to 29 
30 to 34 
35 to 39 
40 to 44 
45 to 49 
50 to 54 
55 to 59 
60 to 64 
65 to 69 
70 to 74 
75 to 79 
80 to 90 
90 years 



year. 



years 

years. . . . 

years 

years 

years 

years 

years 

years 

years — 

years 

years 

years 

years 

years 

years .... 

years 

and over. 



110 
144 
52 
35 
21 
54 
25 
28 
13 
9 
10 



35 



104 

103 

59 

34 

24 

50 

16 

18 

8 

7 

5 

12 

3 

4 

2 

5 

4 

3 



388 



Year Book 



TABLE No. 18. 

PNEUMONIA (All Forms) 

Deaths by Months with Comparison for 10 Years 



Months 



1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


2,349 


4,150 


3,348 


5,640 


3,714 


3,318 


3,098 


2,860 


2,672 


80.2 


141.6 


113.5 


193.7 


128.4 


115.9 


109.6 


102.1 


96.3 


453 


624 


536 


519 


707 


705 


434 


447 


444 


314 


,266 


471 


363 


669 


432 


580 


370 


414 


306 


566 


832 


466 


613 


472 


566 


510 


452 


194 


289 


423 


565 


356 


366 


396 


457 


271 


149 


331 


210 


277 


253 


209 


138 


210 


184 


70 


134 


73 


73 


129 


100 


91 


88 


99 


58 


88 


56 


72 


96 


67 


64 


70 


85 


71 


80 


48 


63 


70 


61 


42 


73 


63 


99 


70 


68 


136 


107 


114 


86 


65 


71 


150 


130 


121 


1,284 


125 


164 


124 


109 


128 


208 


217 


174 


883 


253 


271 


212 


180 


214 


277 


355 


336 


939 


336 


357 


365 


281 


247 



1912 



Total 

Rate per 100 000 populat'n 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



2,838 

103.7 

483 

413 

441 

323 

154 

71 

60 

81 

93 

167 

210 

342 



PNEUMONIA (All Forms) 
Deaths by Ages with Comparison for 10 Years 



Ages 



1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


550 


790 


655 


775 


764 


648 


801 


695 


647 


155 


265 


178 


322 


270 


196 


182 


204 


193 


74 


120 


84 


149 


89 


93 


83 


71 


77 


29 


57 


56 


92 


64 


41 


38 


45 


57 


26 


41 


35 


52 


22 


24 


20 


22 


20 


75 


30 


130 


150 


69 


74 


71 


61 


76 


24 


55 


65 


125 


48 


39 


30 


39 


31 


33 


95 


85 


278 


57 


71 


54 


54 


40 


.26 


149 


157 


423 


72 


67 


49 


34 


42 


46 


260 


232 


586 


85 


72 


64 


53 


52 


60 


205 


192 


517 


75 


67 


62 


43 


59 


85 


190 


176 


375 


123 


102 


77 


72 


62 


85 


140 


93 


198 


100 


98 


78 


71 


83 


54 


130 


106 


153 


140 


109 


96 


86 


71 


55 


136 


114 


151 


135 


113 


114 


110 


109 


85 


175 


115 


124 


181 


139 


128 


116 


104 


122 


176 


148 


172 


210 


205 


152 


177 


105 


150 


225 


153 


184 


229 


220 


179 


190 


134 


150 


277 


200 


176 


265 


247 


237 


197 


215 


175 


265 


136 


175 


320 


285 


245 


184 


218 


260 


335 


209 


227 


375 


348 


287 


285 


242 


30 


34 


29 


38 


21 


60 


41 


51 


35 



1912 



Under 1 year 

1 year , 

2 years , 

3 years .... 

4 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years. . . . 
15 to 19 years. . . 
20 to 24 years... 
25 to 29 years... 
30 to 34 years. . . . 
35 to 39 years. . . 

40 to 44 years 

45 to 49 years 

50 to 54 years 

55 to 59 years. . . 

60 to 64 years 

65 to 69 years 

70 to 74 years. . . 
75 to 79 years. . . . 
80 to 90 years. . . , 
90 years and over 



713 
221 
105 
30 
25 
60 
34 
44 
57 
53 
61 
62 
87 
79 
98 
110 
126 
161 
198 
207 
258 
49 



State Board of Health 



389 



TABLE No, 19. 

DIARRHOEAL DISEASES (Under 2 Years of Age) 

Deaths by Months with Comparison fob 10 Ybar3 



Months 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


1912 


Total 


1,110 

37.9 

34 
35 

38 

35 

49 

69 

213 

185 

222 

148 

45 

37* 


1,032 

35.2 

48 
43 
56 
37 
42 
42 
68 
157 
231 
207 
72 
29 


1,028 

34.8 

48 
47 
48 
42 
38 
60 
144 
165 
166 
157 
81 
32 


1,240 

42.6 

53 
73 
97 
73 
59 
52 
138 
242 
233 
131 
48 
41 


1,478 

51.1 

49 

42 

72 

65 

60 

60 

212 

346 

335 

129 

53 

55 


1,679 

58.7 

57 

57 

71 

73 

71 

82 

274 

351 

331 

191 

75 

46 


1,156 

40.9 

50 

45 

54 

61 

51 

51 

141 

198 

220 

151 

77 

57 


1,627 

58.2 

59 

42 

54 

58 

76 

91 

279 

320 

295 

223 

89 

41 


1,732 

66.1 

42 

38 

61 

63 

50 

104 

339 

426 

229 

249 

84 

47 


1,628 


Rate per 100,000 populat'n 


59.5 
50 




45 




5Q 




53 




45 




57 


July 


272 




376 




360 


October . . . ' 

November 


218 
68 
34 







DIARRHOEAL DISEASES (Over 2 Years of Age) 
Deaths by Months with Comparison for 10 Years 



Months 



1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


438 


357 


376 


444 


399 


453 


383 


460 


506 


14.9 


12.1 


12.8 


15.2 


13.8 


15.8 


13.5 


16.4 


18.2 


22 


15 


11 


22 


22 


21 


22 


33 


22 


18 


24 


9 


24 


14 


19 


14 


22 


19 


19 


33 


15 


37 


13 


24 


21 


24 


25 


21 


25 


22 


30 


24 


18 


27 


29 


18 


28 


15 


16 


28 


24 


21 


17 


21 


25 


37 


18 


15 


23 


29 


24 


20 


29 


48 


83 


29 


48 


51 


47 


78 


38 


63 


76 


76 


59 


87 


78 


75 


75 


62 


84 


108 


42 


45 


62 


80 


78 


90 


59 


61 


68 


47 


47 


50 


33 


34 


42 


49 


41 


51 


29 


28 


21 


20 


12 


25 


24 


30 


31 


16 


19 


20 


18 


27 


16 


30 


23 


15 



1912 



25 

34 
35 
27 
29 
29 
66 
112 
102 
56 
30 
21 



Total 

Rate per 100,000 populat'n 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



390 



Year Book 



TABLE No. 20. 

INFLUENZA (Lagrippe) 

Deaths bt Months with Comparison for 10 Years 



Months 



1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


311 


2,290 


2,929 


6,301 


565 


968 


509 


292 


406 


10.6 


78.1 


99.4 


216.4 


19.5 


33.8 


18.0 


10.4 


14.6 


48 


311 


925 


72 


111 


432 


55 


47 


143 


54 


1,284 


554 


71 


182 


236 


123 


51 


68 


45 


431 


948 


70 


105 


131 


137 


71 


83 


22 


105 


269 


127 


59 


55 


76 


57 


39 


32 


46 


64 


54 


24 


28 


23 


28 


20 


6 


24 


26 


6 


13 


17 


6 


2 


6 


6 


13 


13 


1 


3 


7 


3 


3 


4 


11 


6 


17 


7 


3 


3 


1 


1 


3 


17 


6 


18 


64 


6 


7 


1 


3 


3 


22 


15 


30 


2,092 


5 


4 


6 


2 


5 


16 


18 


32 


1,767 


15 


23 


10 


6 


15 


32 


31 


33 


1,970 


39 


25 


68 


21 


17 



1912 



Total 

Rate per 100,000 populat'n 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



421 

15.3 

72 
98 
74 
46 
9 
7 



INFLUENZA (Lagrippe) 
Deaths by Ages with Comparison for 10 Years 



Ages 



Under 1 year 

1 year 

2 years 

3 years 

4 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years. . . . 
25 to 29 years.... 
30 to 34 years.... 

35 to 39 years 

40 to 44 years 

45 to 49 years 

50 to 54 years — 

55 to 59 years 

60 to 64 years.... 
65 to 69 years — 

70 to 74 years 

75 to 79 years.... 
80 to 90 years.... 
90 years and over 



1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


40 


195 


260 


363 


52 


49 


40 


19 


21 


7 


105 


154 


298 


16 


19 


7 


9 


10 


5 


43 


105 


196 


5 


i9 


7 


1 


8 


1 


27 


171 


125 


4 


7 


3 


1 


1 


3 


16 


36 


122 




1 


4 




1 


13 


70 


154 


297 


8 


13 


12 


5 


5 


8 


45 


82 


250 


7 


11 


4 


4 


4 


7 


115 


174 


278 


7 


8 


9 


4 


4 


6 


140 


235 


704 


f9 


15 


8 


9 


7 


7 


205 


320 


" 925 


13 


12 


4 


9 


5 


15 


240 


274 


826 


10 


15 


9 


4 


5 


13 


195 


176 


508 


10 


18 


10 


4 


6 


14 


105 


127 


267 


11 


20 


9 


5 


13 


15 


180 


92 


150 


12 


16 


13 


5 


5 


18 


75 


104 


115 


20 


22 


16 


11 


14 


15 


60 


85 


100 


27 


42 


26 


18 


25 


16 


90 


81 


120 


35 


58 


31 


21 


19 


20 


95 


76 


94 


42 


64 


49 


26 


34 


26 


97 


90 


98 


71 


148 


64 


30 


48 


22 


93 


55 


95 


81 


167 


61 


44 


64 


34 


85 


66 


102 


116 


201 


103 


58 


84 


6 


14 


12 


15 


10 


33 


20 


5 


21 



1912 



State Board of Health 



391 



TABLE jNo. 21. 
CANCER 
Deaths by Months with Comparison for 10 Years 



Months 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


1912 


Total 


2,681 

91.7 

228 
196 
228 
245 
223 
233 
214 
261 
210 
234 
212 
197 


2,592 

88.4 

240 
211 
225 
213 
194 
230 
239 
196 
219 
201 
212 
212 


2,518 

85.4 

208 
191 
205 
197 
195 
225 
262 
219 
191 
202 
202 
221 


2,558 

88.0 

225 
206 
258 
199 
192 
208 
212 
234 
205 
208 
216 
195 


2,542 

87.9 

216 
217 
242 
206 
223 
174 
219 
212 
208 
203 
209 
213 


2,383 

83.3 

207 
203 
207 
194 
189 
181 
197 
209 
206 
207 
180 
203 


2,314 

81.9 

177 
176 
203 
201 
193 
202 
197 
206 
200 
193 
194 
172 


2,193 

78.4 

172 
162 
183 
202 
208 
195 
194 
190 
176 
170 
173 
168 


2,226 

80.1 

198 
185 
189 
168 
204 
173 
207 
204 
197 
177 
168 
156 


2,017 


Rate per 100,000 populat'n 


73.4 
154 




163 




180 




183, 




142 




178 


July 


184 




16G 




146 




172 




163 


December 


186 



EXTERNAL CAUSES 
Deaths by Months with Comparison for 10 Years 



Accidental 
Suicides... 
Homicides 



Months 

Total 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



1921 1920 1919 1918 1917 1916 1915 J 1914 



1,913 
431 
186 



2,530 

179 
195 
159 
176 
242 
265 
282 
219 
220 
202 
186 
205 



327 
135 



2,430 

183 
155 



205 
206 
243 
197 
215 
229 
220 
199 



,800 
364 
130 



2,298 

172 
150 
171 

186 
185 
215 
238 
203 
208 
187 
195 



339 
109 



,646 

185 
215 
245 
216 
216 
279 
273 
258 
197 
204 
189 
169 



2,401 
423 
194 



1,018 

213 

217 
282 
231 
268 
265 
308 
273 
243 
247 
258 
213 



2,270 
484 
143 



1,972 
425 
149 



2,897 

207 
178 
192 
201 
231 
250 
383 
324 
259 
233 
214 
225 



2,546 

194 
193 
203 
203 
205 
196 
266 
233 
240 
185 
200 
228 



2,0921 
478 
178 



2,748 

196 
187 
225 
196 
228 
274 
280 
270 
228 
250 
220 
192 



11913 



2,453 
441 
152 



3,046 

187 
176 
269 
232 
219 
325 
361 
347 
256 
221 
' 239 
214 



1912 



2,049 
458 
131 



2,628 

185 
183 
205 
196 
204 
218 
265 
253 
231 
225 
235 
226 



392 



Year Book 



TABLE No. 22 

EXTERNAL CAUSES 

DEATHS BY EXTERNAL CAUSES FOR 7 YEARS 



1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


1916 


2,530 


2,430 


2,298 


2,646 


3,018 


2,897 


86.0 


82.9 


77.9 


94 


104.4 


101.2 


116 


91 


111 


97 


108 


180 


15 


13 


17 


9 


17 


12 


70 


69 


59 


59 


73 


69 


31 


21 


29 


21 


23 


28 


162 


107 


115 


122 


154 


155 


23 


15 


21 


22 


35 


25 


2 


4 


1 


2 


2 


5 


4 


5 


9 


3 




4 


8 


2 


2 


4 


11 


6 


431 


327 


364 


339 


423 


484 


28 


31 


34 


47 


28 


27 


43 


49 


48 


52 


51 


44 


16 


24 


15 


14 


30 


21 


132 


157 


160 


200 


159 


139 


28 


53 


39 


55 


94 


76 


171 


122 


163 


137 


147 


186 


60 


58 


46 


63 


78 


69 


9 


2 


9 


2 


5 


14 


312 


251 


241 


384 


423 


464 


65 


103 


91 


111 


117 


56 


23 


51 


64 


61 


63 


48 


10 


11 


19 


50 


8 


14 


265 


270 


284 


444 


515 


463 


17 


39 


40 


46 


92 


95 


313 


363 


241 


217 


208 


167 


32 


36 


37 


24 


65 


64 


3 


3 


4 


6 


2 


2 


16 


13 


11 


22 


25 


17 


45 


34 


50 


65 


36 


36 


4 


6 


8 


11 


2 




2 


7 


4 


10 


17 


17 


28 


9 


20 


26 


15 


96 


28 


16 


22 


12 


17 


20 


19 


29 


37 


44 


39 


33 


55 


53 


13 


3 




1 


189 


178 


104 


92 


165 


101 


1,913 


1,968 


1,804 


2,198 


2,401 


2,270 


140 


105 


93 


77 


140 


96 


10 


10 


8 


12 


25 


17 


36 


20 


29 


20 


29 


30 


186 


135 


130 


109 


194 


143 



1915 



Total External Deaths., 
Rate per 100,000 Population 

155 Suicide by Poison 

156 Suicide by Asphyxia 

157 Suicide by Hanging 

158 Suicide by Drowning 

159 Suicide by Firearms 

160 Suicide by Cutting 

161 Suicide by Jumping 

162 Suicide by Crushing 

163 Suicide by Orther means 

Total Suicides 

164 Poison by Food 

165 Poison by other means 

166 Conflagration 

167 Burns 

168 Deleterious gases 

169 Accidental drowning 

170 Traumatism by firearms 

171 Traumatism by cutting 

172 Traumatism by fall 

173 Traumatism by mines and quarries 

174 Traumatism by machines 

175 Other crushings 

175-A Accidents 

175-B Accidents, street car 

175-C Accidents, automobile 

175-D Injuries by other vehicles 

175-F Accidents, bicycle 

175-G Accidents, motorcycle 

176 Injuries by animals 

177 Starvation 

178 Excessive cold 

179 Excessive heat 

180 Lightning 

181 Electricity (lightning excepted) — 

185 Fractures 

186 Other external causes 

Accidental or Undefined 

182 Homicide by firearms 

183 Homicide by cutting 

184 Homicide by other means 

Homicides 



2,546 
90.1 

147 
13 
64 
26 

130 



425 

26 
45 
33 

152 
54 

148 
72 
21 

467 
56 
49 
37 

335 
71 

125 
84 
1 
9 
31 
1 
7 

10 

13 

23 

2 

100 

1,972 

107 
15 
27 

149 



State Board of Health 



393 



TABLE No. 23 

SMALLPOX 

DEATHS BY MONTHS WITH TOTAL FOR 10 YEARS 



Months 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


1912 


Total 


21 

4 
3 
1 
3 
3 
2 
1 


15 

1 

2 
2 
2 

1 

f 

2 


12 

1 

i' 

2 
2 


24 

3 

7 
2 
3 
3 
1 
3 


14 

2 

1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
4 


1 

i' 


10 

1 
1 
1 

3 

1 


8 


11 
1 


12 




2 




i' 

1 
1 


1 


3 




2 








1 

1 
1 


3 


July 












2 


1 


































3 
3 


1 




1 

3 


4' 


2 
3 


2" 


1 






i 

2 








1 


1 









TABLE No. 24 

TOTAL DEATHS AND RATE PER 100,000 POPULATION FOR TUBERCULOSIS (All Forms) AND 
TYPHOID FEVER IN THE FOLLOWING CITIES— YEAR 1921 



Tuberculosis 
(All Forms) 



Typhoid Fever 





Total 


Rate 


Total 


Rate 


State of Indiana 


2,712 

398 
68 
92 
46 
52 
61 
43 
14 
11 
16 
28 
16 
24 
21 
20 
26 

8 
23 
21 
17 

4 
11 
12 

6 
14 
12 

9 
11 

7 
13 
15 


92.7 

126.6 

78.6 

107.9 

64.8 

78.8 

110.1 

117.4 

38.8 

30.5 

53.7 

93.1 

59.7 

98.8 

88.4 

86.9 

115.6 

36.9 

118.2 

122.0 

111.8 

26.3 

76.0 

85.7 

48.3 

120.7 

103.5 

82.1 

101.9 

68.0 

128.2 

148.5 


360 

23 
18 
7 
3 
5 
4 
6 
8 
9 
5 
3 
2 
3 
2 
3 
5 
5 
2 
9 
2 
2 


12.3 


Cities: — 


7.3 


Ft. Wayne 


20.7 




8.2 


South Bend 


4 2 




7.5 




7.2 




16.4 




22 2 


East Chicago 


25.0 




16.8 




9.9 


Richmond ............ 


7.5 


Elkhart 


12.3 




8.4 


New Albany 


13.0 




22.2 




- 23.1 




10.2 




52.2 


Mishawaka 


13.1 




13.1 


NeAi. Castle 


6.9 


Huntington 


7.1 


Peru * . . 




Bloomin,ton 




17.2 


Frankfort 


8.6 


Clinton 


9.1 


Elwood 


27.8 


Whiting 


9.8 










9.9 







394 



Year Book 



TABLE No. 25 

TOTAL DEATHS AND RATE PER 100,000 POPULATION FOR PNEUMONIA (All Forms) AND 
INFLUENZA IN THE FOLLOWING CITIES— YEAR 1921 





Pneumonia 
(All Forms) 


Influenza 




Total 


Rate 


Total 


Rate 




2,349 

313 
58 
69 
55 
48 
103 
34 
26 
75 
24 
15 
16 
16 
25 

9 
17 
19 
23 
22 
18 

5 
11 

6 
13 
19 
13 
10 

6 
13 

7 


80.2 

99.6 

67.1 

80.9 

77.4 

72.6 
186.0 

93.1 

72.2 
208.5 

80.6 

50.4 

59.7 

65.9 - 
105.2 

39.1 

75.6 

87.8 
118.2 
127.8 
118.4 

32.9 

76.0 

42.8 
104.7 
163.8 
112.2 

91.2 

55.6 
128.1 

69.0 


311 

28 
4 
7 
3 
7 
4 

10 
3 
5 
4 

4 
4 
3 
6 
4 
5 


10.6 


Cities: — 


8.9 


Ft, Wayne 


4.6 




8.2 




14.2 




10.5 




7.2 




27.3 




(8.3 




13.9 




13.4 




3.3 




14.9 


Elkhart 


16.4 




12.6 




26.0 




17.7 




23.1 








1 
2 


5.8 




13.1 








4 

1 


27.6 




7.1 














3 
3 
1 


25.8 




27.3 




9.2 








2 


19.7 




7 1 69.3 


1 













State Board of Health 



395 



TABLE No. 26 

TOTAL DEATHS AND RATE PER 100,000 POPULATION FOR CANCER AND EXTERNAL CAUSES 
IN THE FOLLOWING CITIES— YEAR 1921 





Cancer 


External Causes 




Total 


Rate 


Total 


Rate 




2,681 

336 
99 
83 
65 
57 
26 
37 
30 
► 9 
34 
24 
19 
31 
22 
34 
34 
20 
18 
17 
16 
23 
10 
19 
>9 
10 
15 
(5 
15 
6 
17 
12 


91.7 

106.9 

114.3 
97.3 
91.5 
86.2 
46.9 

101.3 
83.3 
25.0 

114.2 
79.8 
70.9 
[127.6 
92.6 

147.8 

151.2 
92.4 
92.5 
98.8 
98.7 

151.7 
69.1 

135.7 
72.5 
86.2 

129.4 
@M5,6 

139.0 
59.1 

167.6 

118.8 


2,530 

249 
68 
75 
63 
104 
111 
34 
58 
45 
21 
14 

8 
19 
20 
28 
28 
11 
19 
22 
13 
11 

5 
10 

7 

7 

15 
15 

7 
19 
13 

8 


86 4 


Cities:— 


79.2 


Ft. Wayne 


78.6 




87.9 r 


South Bend 


88.7 




157.2 


Gary 


200.4 




93.1 




161.0 




125.1 




70.5 




46.5 




29.8 


Elkhart 


78.2 




84.2 




121.7 




124.5 




50.8 




97.7 




127.8 




85.5 




72.5 




34.5 




71.4 


Peru 


56.4 




60.3 




129.4 




136.8 


Elwood 


64.8 


Whiting 


187.2 




128.2 




79.2 







396 



Year Book 



TABLE No. 27 

1921— INFANT MORTALITY 

BIRTHS IN INDIANA DURING THE YEAR SHOWING NUMBER OF DEATHS UNDER 1 YEAR PER 

1,000 BIRTHS. ALSO SEX OF CHILDREN BORN 





Males 


Females 


Total 
Births 


Deaths 
Under 
1 Year 


Infant 

Deaths 

Per 1,000 

Births 




33,027 

234 

1,112 

250 

149 

188 

239 

95 

152 

423 

232 

335 
298 
132 
331 
223 

139 
252 
566 
236 

707 

187 
294 
223 
149 
172 

324 
601 
337 
234 
149 

211 
180 
332 
580 
396 

295 
189 
284 
199 
146 

226 

594 

318 

80 

2,090 

636 
446 
791 
3,899 
293 

154 

301 
361 
282 
231 


35,220 

276 

1,275 

242 

130 

170 

276 
96 
155 
433 
316 

366 
313 
122 
370 

232 

176 
305 
619 
206 
665 

188 
352 
201 
186 ' 
172 

359 
570 
517 

286 
180 

226 
221 
350 
527 

388 

295 
178 
266 
223 
145 

217 
607 
303 
175 
2,657 

613 

420 

795 

3,868 

273 

160 
354 
369 
266 
257 


68,247 

510 

2,487 
492 
279 
358 

515 
191 
307 

856 
548 

701 
611 
254 
701 
455 

315 
557 

1,185 
442 

1,372 

375 
646 
424 
335 
344 

683 
1,171 
854 
520 
329 

437 
401 

682 
1,107 

784 

590 
367 
550 

422 
291 

443 

1,201 

621 

255 

4,747 

1,249 

866 

1,586 

7,767 

566 

314 

655 
730 
548 
488 


4,860 

27 
144 
41 
16 
23 

41 

23 
15 
59 
35 

52 

52 
17 
51 

28 

26 
30 
105 
31 

83 

27 
30 
37 
17 
24 

47 
95 
80 
40 
22 

20 
11 
64 
101 
60 

37 
16 
28 
28 
12 

29 

103 

37 

16 

434 

81 
65 
111 
583 
31 

24 
48 
42 
34 
31 


71.2 


Counties 


52.9 


Allen 


57.9 




83.3 




57.3 




64.2 




79.6 




120.4 


Carroll 


48.9 




68.9 


Clark . 


63.9 


Clay 


74.2 




85.1 




66.9 




72.8 




60.2 




82.2 


Dekalb 


53.9 




88.6 




72.4 


Elkhart . 


60.1 




72.0 • 


Floyd 


46.4 




87.3 




50.7 


Fulton 


68.6 




68.8 




81.1 




93.7 




76.9 




66.8 




45.8 




27.4 




93.8 




91.2 




76.5 




62.7 




43.6 




50.9 




66.4 




41.2 




65.5 




85.8 




59.6 




62.7 




91.0 




64.9 




75.1 




69.9 




74.8 




54.8 




76.4 




73.3 




57.5 




62.1 




63.5 



State Board of Health 

TABLE No. 27— Continued 



397 



Newton 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 

Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph. . . 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

Steuben 

St. Joseph . . 
Sullivan. . . . 
Switzerland . 
Tippecanoe . . 
Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh 
Vermillion. . 
Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington . 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley 



107 
240 
43 
181 
126 

193 
207 
240 
226 
229 
» 
143 
204 
295 
165 
218 

74 
246 
194 
108 
125 

1,423 

374 

94 

512 

165 

74 

961 

305 

1,129 

282 
118 
214 
171 

458 
242 
189 
175 



114 

232 

37 

199 
148 

176 

227 
236 
231 
229 

154 

217 
302 
238 
211 

82 
284 
241 
148 
130 



496 
101 
472 
205 

50 

1,127 

329 

1,254 

283 
121 
271 
205 

503 

242 
188 
164 



Total 
Births 



221 
472 
80 
380 
274 

369 
434 

476 
457 
458 

297 
421 
597 
403 
429 

156 
530 
435 
256 

255 



870 
195 
984 
370 

124 

,088 
634 
,383 

565 
239 

485 



961 
484 
377 
339 



Deaths 
Under 
1 Year 



13 
26 
1 
27 
15 

39 
21 
44 
37 
27 

25 
36 
36 
21 
30 

8 
30 
26 
18 
12 

202 



127 

63 

211 

28 
12 
40 
23 

78 
18 
19 
16 



Infant 

Deaths 

Per 1,000 

Births 



58.8 
55.1 
12.5 
68.4 
54.7 

105.4 
48.4 
92.5 
80.9 
58.9 

84.2 

85.5 
60.3 
52.1 



51.3 
58.5 
59.8 
70.3 
47.1 



56.4 
64.0 
64.9 

64.5 

60.8 
99.4 
88.5 

49.6. 

50.2 
82.5 
61.2 

81.2 
37.2 
50.4 

47.2 



Year Book 

TABLE No. 28 
BIRTHS BY MONTHS, SEX, COLOR, ETC.— 10 YEARS 



1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


68,247 


64,809 


59,273 


64,313 


63,073 


63,312 


61,850 


61,889 


59, 180 


23.3 


22.1 


20.1 


22.1 


21.8 


22.1 


21.9 


22.1 


21.3 


33,027 


31,086 


28,611 


32,702 


32,770 


32,421 


31,701 


32,018 


30,423 


35,220 


33,723 


30,662 


31,611 


30,303 


30,891 


30,149 


29,871 


28,757 


66,505 


63,261 


57,903 


62,986 


61,871 


62,343 


60,883 


60,776 


58,238 


1,742 


1,548 


1,370 


1,327 


1,202 


969 


967 


1,113 


942 


2,104 


1,994 


1,825 


2,079 


2,091 


2,141 


2,051 


2,118 


1,668 


• 1,060 


1,010 


900 


909 


873 


920 


881 


941 


986 


790 


746 


650 


786 


675 


625 


619 


569 


594 


5,447 


5,527 


4,934 


5,355 


5,740 


5,575 


5,246 


5,188 


4,876 


5,461 


5,655 


4,652 


5,205 


5,272 


5,408 


4,887 


5,002 


4,629 


5,874 


5,595 


5,299 


5,939 


5,672 


5,699 


5,270 


5,410 


5,295 


5,660 


5,066 


4,860 


5,673 


5,210 


5,377 


4,827 


4,623 


4,581 


6,089 


5,490 


4,716 


5,417 


4,651 


5,276 


2,993 


4,819 


4,697 


5,468 


5,446 


4,462 


5,485 


4,855 


4,945 


5,163 


4,923 


4,536 


5,686 


5,732 


4,660 


5,641 


5,591 


5,315 


5,431 


5,484 


4,977 


5,848 


5,874 


4,643 


5,776 


5,706 


5,463 


5,395 


5,471 


5,041 


5,961 


5,516 


4,962 


5,332 


5,459 


5,303 


5,466 


5,488 


5,103 


5,612 


5,268 


5,428 


5,236 


5,189 


4,921 


5,332 


5,222 


5,055 


5,431 


4,657 


5,180 


4,563 


4,784 


4,848 


4,865 


4,862 


4,878 


5,710 


4,983 


5,477 


4,691 


4,944 


5,182 


4,975 


4,829 


4,912 



1912 



Total births . . 
Birth rate — 

Males 

Females 

White 

Colored 

Stillbirths. . . . 
Illegitimates . 
Plural births . 

By Months 

January 

February .... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . . 

October 

November . . . 
December. . . . 



57,855 
20.9 

29,693 
28,162 

56,915 
940 

1,757 

871 

1,116 



4,930 
4,818 
4,976 
4,385 
4,663 
4,592 
5,093 
5,240 
4,874 
4,807 
4,415 
4,504 



TABLE No. 29 

Deaths bt Months, Sex, Color, Conjuc l Condition and Nationality— 10 Years 





1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


1912 


Total deaths 
(Stillbirths 
Exc.)..... 
Death rate — 

Males 

Females 

White 

Colored 

Single 

Married 

American 

Foreign 


35, 134 
12.0 

17,835 
17,299 

33,615 
1,519 

10,536 
24,598 

32,262 
2,872 


39,430 
13.4 

20,073 
19,357 

37,665 
1,765 

13,376 
26,054 

35,852 
3,578 


37,077 
12.5 

18,596 
18,481 

35,482 
1,595 

12,480 
24,597 

33,819 
3,258 


46,361 
15.9 

24,052 
22,309 

44,323 
2,038 

16,914 
29,447 

42,282 
4,079 


39, 785 
13.7 

21,562 
18,823 

37,614 
2,171 

14,097 

25,688 

35,852 
3,933 


38,249 
13.3 

20,495 
17,754 

36,831 
1,418 

13,211 
25,038 

34,709 

3,419 

121 

4,161 
3,354 
3,672 
3,305 
2,986 
2,576 
3,149 
3,100 
3,006 
3,006 
2,802 
3,132 


35,416 
12.5 

19,123 
16,293 

34,157 
1,255 

12,005 
23,411 

32,227 
3,102 

87 

3,161 
3,378 
3,817 
3,260 
2,736 
2,433 
2,596 
2,602 
2,743 
2,725 
2,750 
3,215 


35,869 
12.8 

19,217 
16,652 

34,771 
1,098 

13,041 

22,828 

33,003 

2,795 

71 

3,161 
3,010 
3,670 
3,395 
3,078 
2,650 
2,877 
2,913 
2,785 
2,794 
2,678 
2,858 


36,710 
13.2 

19,929 
16,781 

35,549 
1,161 

13,849 
22,861 

33,807 

2,715 

188 

3,323 
3,103 
3,660 
3,112 
3,023 
2,941 
3,056 
3,223 
2,873 
2,893 
2,793 
2,710 


35,771 
13.1 

19,198 
16,573 

34,658 
1,113 

13,060 
22,711 

32,191 

3,258 

332 


By Months 

January 

February 

March 

April 


3,293 
3,017 
3,087 
2,868 
2,934 
2,622 
2,952 
2,817 
2,764 
3,023 
2,841 
2,916 


3,890 
5,726 
4,160 
3,272 
3,287 
2,709 
2,681 
2,532 
2,625 
2,793 
2,763 
2,990 


4,233 
3,588 
4,624 
3,277 
2,814 
2,430 
2,762 
2,540 
2,472 
2,605 
2,685 
3,046 


3,722 
3,367 
3,829 
4,039 
3,296 
2,703 
2,769 
2,945 
2,908 
6,101 
5,066 
5,616 


3,776 
3,874 
4,085 
3.565 
3,394 
2,824 
3,024 
3,078 
3,030 
3,040 
2,884 
3,211 


3,313 
3,111 

3,484 
3,199 




2,695 




2,420 


July 


2,708 


August 

September 

October 

November 

December 


2,985 
2,908 
2,964 
2,785 
3,199 



State Board of Health 



399 



TABLE No. 30 
DEATHS BY AGE GROUPS— 10 YEARS 



Age 



Under 1 year — 
1 to 5 years... 
5 to 10 years. . . 

10 to 20 years. .. 

20 to 30 years... 

30 to 40 years... 

40 to 50 years. . 

50 to 60 years 

60 to 70 years. . . . 

70 to 80 years. . . , 

80 years and over 

Unknown years . . 



1921 



1,915 
860 
1,500 
1,850 
2,253 
2,576 
3,920 
5,250 
6,225 
3,900 
25 



1920 



5,296 
2,441 
763 
1750 
2,885 
3,076 
3,101 
3,618 
5,765 
6,546 
4,147 
47 



1919 



4,690 
1,995 
800 
1 700 
3,045 
3,050 
2,905 
3,725 
5,150 
6,291 
3,700 



1918 



5,685 
3,101 
1,176 
2,810 
5,103 
4,800 
3,570 
4,170 
5,677 
6,434 
3,725 
110 



1917 



5,327 
2,300 

816 
1,650 
2,850 
2,925 
3,100 
4,176 
5,701 
6,525 
4,401 
14 



1916 



5,418 
2,065 
717 
1,569 
2,624 
2,723 
3,017 
4,055 
5,669 
6,417 
3,967 
8 



1915 



4,947 
1,726 
683 
1,352 
2,373 
2,477 
2,861 
3,926 
5,230 
6,122 
3,700 
19 



1914 



5,452 
2,107 
739 
1,401 
2,540 
2,658 
2,768 
3,833 
5,001 
5,724 
3,619 
27 



1913 



5,757 
2,338 
867 
1,601 
2,694 
2,692 
2,759 
3,833 
4,968 
5,720 
3,552 
33 



1912 



5,388 
2,142 
758 
1,462 
2,701 
2,562 
2,768 
3,732 
4,974 
5,622 
3,646' 



TABLE No. 31 
MORTALITY STATE OF INDIANA-5 YEARS COMPARISON 



1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


23.3 


22.1 


20.1 


22.1 


12.0 


13.4 


12.5 


15.9 


71.2 


81.4 


79.1 


88.4 


92.7 


107.7 


110.8 


136.3 


12.3 


9.6 


11.5 


13.7 


23.9 


12.2 


10.9 


14.7 


5.2 


6.6 


2.7 


4.0 


2.4 


9.8 


2.4 


4.1 


11.8 


8.9 


2.2 


16.1 


80.2 


141.6 


113.5 


193.7 


37 9 


35 2 


34.8 


42.6 


.9 


.7 


.9 


1.5 


1.1 


.4 


.9 


1.1 


10.6 


78.1 


99.4 


216.4 


6.2 


7.6 


6.3 


8.4 


91.7 


88.4 


85.4 


72.3 


86.4 


82.9 


77.9 


94.0 


.7 


.6 


.4 


.8 



1917 



Birth rate per 1,000 population 

Death rate per 1,000 population 

Infant mortality rate, per 1,000 living births 

Following Disease Death Rate Peb 100,000 op Population 

Tuberculosis (all forms) 

Typhoid fever 

Diphtheria-croup — 

Scarlet fever 

Measles . ; 

Whooping cough 

Broncho and lobar pneumonia 

Diarrhoea-enteritis (under 2 years) 

Cerebro spinal fever 

Poliomyelitis 

Influenza 

Puerperal septicemia 

Cancer 

External causes 

Smallpox 



21.8 
13.7 
84.4 



137.4 

17.1 

15.3 

4.9 

19i0 

8.6 

128.4 

51.1 

2.1 

1.1 

19.5 

7.0 

87.9 

104.4 

.5 



400 



Year Book 



TABLE No. 32 

COLORED MORTALITY FOR STATE OF INDIANA DURING YEARS 1920 AND 1921 

1921 1920 

Total Total 

Total Births 1,742 1,548 

Males 857 780 

Females 885 768 

Total Deaths 1 ,519 1 ,765 

Males 790 930 

Females 729 835 

Under 1 year 210 270 

1 to 10 years 115 150 

65 years and over 250 275 

Tuberculosis 253 300 

Typhoid fever 15 14 

Diphtheria— Croup 12 6 

Scarlet fever 2 

Measles .... 4 

Whoping coough 16 13 

Pneumonia 170 280 

Diarrhoea (Under 2 years) 41 55 

Influenza 17 75 

Puerperal septicemia 6 7 

Cancer 63 70 

External causes 125 120 

Smallpox 3 .... 

Syphilis 20 11 

TABLE No. 33 
Deaths From the Puerperal State, With Rate Per 100,000 Population—Five Year Comparison 



Mothers 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


Total j Rate 


Total 


Rate 


Total 


Rate 


Total 


Rate 


Total 


Rate 


Accidents of pregnancy . . . 
Puerperal hemorrhage .... 
Other accidents of labor . . 

Puerperal septicemia 

Puerperal convulsions .... 
Puerperal embolus, etc. . . 
Following childbirth, etc. . 


42 

33 

52 

183 

104 

19 

3 


1.4 
1.1 

1.7 

6.2 

3.5 

.6 

.1 


60 
40 
45 
224 
95 
19 
2 


2.4 
1.3 
15 
7.6 
3.2 
.7 
.1 


58 
37 
44 
187 
79 
17 
6 


1.9 
1.3 

1.5 
6.3 

2.7 
.6 
.2 


92 
38 
21 
245 
102 
17 
10 


3.1 
1.3 

.7 

8.4 

3.5 

.6 

.4 


29 

32 

27 

203 

105 

13 

5 


1.0 

1.1 

.9 

7.0 

3.6 

.4 

.1 



Deaths From Causes Peculiar to Early Infancy, With Rate Per 100,000 Population 



Infants 



Premature births (Still- 


1,159 


Congenital debility 


283 
168 


Other causes of early in- 


298 




9 




42 


Malformation of the heart 
Other congenital malfor- 


308 
91 


Stillbirths Excluded 
From Above 


2,104 


Total living births 

Total infant deaths under 1 

year of age 

Infant mortality rate per 

1,000 births 


68,247 
4,860 



1921 



Total Rate 



39.6 
9.6 
5.7 

10.1 

.3 

1.4 

10.5 

3.0 



23 3 



1920 



Total Rate 



1,210 
339 
170 

254 
10 
32 

329 

93 

1,994 
64,809 
5,276 



41.2 
11.5 
5.8 



.3 

1.0 

11.2 



22.1 



81.4 



1919 



Total Rate 



,061 
255 
161 

213 

9 

39 



1,825 
59,273 
4,690 



39.5 
8.6 
5.5 

7.5 

.3 

1.3 



3.1 



20.1 



79.1 



1918 



Total Rate 



1,227 
228 
111 

253 

5 

30 

229 



2,079 
64,313 
5,685 



42.1 
7.8 
3.9 

8.7 

.2 

1.0 

7.9 

7.2 



1917 



Total Rate 



1,257 
210 
159 

202 



40 
352 



151 





2,091 


22.1 


63,073 




5,327 


88.4 





43.5 
7.2 
5.5 



1.3 
12.1 



5.2 



21.8 



84.4 



INDIANA STATE FIRE MARSHAL 



NEWMAN T. MILLED, State Fire Marshal. 
G. L. PUGH, First Deputy State Fire Marshal. 
JOHN D. CRAMER, Second Deputy State Fire Marshal. 
CLARA McCAMPBELL, Secretary. 

LEGAL DIVISION 

CHESTER A. DAVIS, Attorney. 
M. W. WAREING, Assistant. 

ARSON DIVISION 

G. L. PUGH, Chief Investigator. 

H. L. NICHOLSON, Assistant, Crown Point, Indiana. 

ELMER VROOMAN, Assistant, Wabash, Indiana. 

CHAS. HOOVER, Assistant, Maywood, Indiana. 

H. S. WEYMIRE, Assistant, Elwood, Indiana. 

NINA E. SCHOPPE, Shorthand Reporter. 

INSPECTION DIVISION 

JOHN D. CRAMER, Chief Inspector. 
CASH M. GRAHAM, Assistant, South Whitley, Indiana. 
THOS. McCORMICK, Assistant, Delphi, Indiana. 
GEO. H. FELTHAUS, Assistant, Evansville, Indiana. 

EDUCATIONAL DIVISION 
VIVIAN T. WHEATCRAFT, Assistant, Whiteland, Indiana. 

OFFICE 

LILLIAN KLINGE, Bookkeeper and Statistician. 
ALICE KLINGE, Order Clerk and Stenographer. 

For the year of October 1, 1921, to October 1, 1922, 962 orders 
were issued by the department as the result of inspections, these orders 
calling for the removal of dilapidated structures, repair of buildings, 
improvement of garages, motion picture shows, school buildings, dry 
cleaning plants, etc. 

All orders were issued by the department after a careful resume of 
the work of inspectors, primarily that the menace to human life might 
be eliminated as far as possible in places of assembly and public gath- 
ering. 

A reduction over the previous year of $1,300,000 in fire losses in the 
state, the largest reduction in any year, ever recorded, speaks volumes 
for the co-operation afforded the department and the aroused interest 
of our citizenship in the fire prevention movement. 

Special attention was given throughout the year to fire hazards 

26—22978 (401) 



402 Year Book 

surrounding and commonly incident to school buildings, some 209 orders 
being issued thereon, in addition to orders enumerated above with the 
very gratifying result that only 45 fires occurred in school buildings, and 
not one death or injury to any child was suffered thereby. 

FIRE LOSS STATISTICS 

FIRES AND LOSSES BY YEARS SINCE DEPARTMENT WAS ESTABLISHED 

Number of Fires Loss 

1913 (last eight months) 6,209 $5,932,110 

1914 8,006 7,926,936 

1915 7,106 5,734,865 

1916 6,018 6,437,957 

1917 5,764 6,179,436 

1918 4,967 7,055,090 

1919 5,348 6,135,526 

1920 5,083 8,228,896 

1921 4,510 6,672,828 

1922 (first eight months) 3,873 4,244,834 

The Statistical Division prepares at the end of each calendar year 
ten statistical tables, which are compiled from daily fire reports received 
from the 1,200 fire marshal assistants throughout the state. Following 
are fire loss statistics for 1921 : 

INDEX TO STATISTICAL TABLES 

I. For each mont 1 . — the number of losses and the total loss. 
II. For each cause — the number of fires, valuation and loss, on build- 
ings and on contents. 

III. For each class of property — the number of fires, value, loss and 

insurance on buildings and on contents. 

IV. For each class of property — the causes, the number of total and 

partial losses, and the kind of structure. 
V. For each month — the number and loss from fires of unknown 

origin. 
VI. For each month — the number of incendiary fires and resulting 

loss. 
VII. For each city of four thousand or more population — the popula- 
tion, number of fires, loss per capita, value, loss and insur- 
ance on property directly jeopardized. 
VIII. Lightning statistics. Number of losses and amounts of loss on 
rodded and unrodded buildings. Number of lightning losses 
in cities and towns and in country. 
IX. Statistics for districts outside incorporated cities and towns. 



State Fire Marshal 



403 



TABLE I 
TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRES AND LOSSES BY MONTHS 



Month 


Number of 
Losses 


Loss 




474 
437 
419 
354 
504 
254 
467 
263 
222 
392 
336 
388 


$605, 698 




387,709 




649,740 




558,586 




819,828 




340,329 


July 


1,040,537 




366,044 
323,547 






487,516 




476,613 




616,681 






Totals 


4,510 


$6,672,828 







TABLE II 
CAUSE STATISTICS 



Cause 



No. of 



Value of 
Buildings 



Value of 
Contents 



Loss on 
Buildings 



Loss on 
Contents 



Adjoining 

Alcohol explosion 

Ashe3 against wood 

Back fire. 

Boiling oil. 

Burning rubbish 

Candle 

Careless smoker 

Careless with matches. . . 

Child with matches 

Christmas tree 

Defective boiler 

Defective flue 

Defective furnace 

Defective grate 

Defective heater 

Defective stove 

Defective wiring 

Drapery against fire 

Electric iron 

Explosion of chemicals. . . 

Film ignited 

Fireworks 

Fumigating 

Gas explosion 

Gas jet 

Gasoline explosion 

Gasoline stove explosion. 

Gas stove explosion 

Hot iron 

Incendiary 

Incubator lamp 

Kerosene explosion 

Kerosene lamp ■ 

Kerosene stove explosion 

Lightning 

Overheated smokehouse. 

Spark from chimney 

Spark from locomotive. . . 
Spontaneous combustion 
Thawing water pipes 

Torch 

Tramp 

Unknown 

Vulcanizing 

Total 



225 
3 



19 
93 
5 

77 

68 

87 

5 

7 

345 

58 

16 

28 

100 

179 

17 

22 

6 

7 

23 
2 



4 

4 

67 

6 

17 

25 

98 

165 

30 

1,457 

47 

105 

4 

12 

6 

912 

3 



$1,090,355 

1,200 

112,200 

234,861 

842,675 

675,760 

20,000 

1,239,876 

469,625 

132,570 

138,000 

55,000 

1,081,550 

912,700 

167,500 

2,609,000 

343,865 

3,784,600 

79,400 

236,300 

82,500 

162,500 

101,200 

14,800 

780,240 

19,200 

703,910 

67,700 

38.50C 

11,500 

451,975 

- 9,900 

166,700 

48, 100 

315,285 

520,410 

329,360 

5,163,799 

94,550 

2,248,803 

13,000 

91,150 

24,250 

10,025,697 

4,850 



$702,560 

100 

90,805 

464,210 

149,210 

219,855 

5,600 

452,205 

245,045 

45,050 

53,400 

19,600 

336,298 

261,915 

30,600 

446,283 

158,595 

2,468,540 

24,400 

151,448 

53,600 

41,800 

25,900 

4,000 

218,200 

43,000 

177,710 

28,400 

10,200 

5,100 

263,365 

4,225 

72,250 

16, 120 

83,020 

268,629 

55,228 

2,199,514 

49,581 

2,001,105 

4,700 

190,030 

3,050 

6,500,822 

7,300 



$141,745 

1,105 

7,898 

13, 131 

9,431 

53,815 

85 

21,629 

30,810 

24,500 

289 

2,635 

298,464 

194,480 

32,191 

12,836 

30,005 

121,977 

4,426 

14,839 

1,085 

45,010 

4,695 

1,150 

7,470 

895 

12,385 

2,310 

206 

50 

174,992 

2,550 

12,430 

21,178 

30,894 

232,647 

10,944 

440,646 

29,451 

133,281 

190 

3,519 

19,850 

1,427,956 

1,650 



$71,116 

100 

990 

5,964 

6,728 

18,025 

190 

14,096. 

25,583 

9,246 

222 

600 

75,949 

7,504 

8,223 

3,442 

28,904 

119,744 

1,802 

43,374 

417 

6,500 

2,000 

140 

3,037 

400 

14,963 

2,365 

700 

275 

176,597 

1,525 

4,888 

6,553 

16,773 

107,851 

7,156 

124,896 

34,396 

552,852 



9,277 

3,050 

1,517,678 

3,012 



4,510 



$35,716,916 



$18,652,568 



$3,633,725 



$3,039,103 



404 



Year Book 



TABLE III 
PROPERTY STATISTICS 



Property 



Automobile 

Awning 

Bakery 

Bank 

Barber shop 

Barn 

Blacksmith shop. . 

Boat 

Box car 

Bridge 

Church 

City building 

Club 

Depot 

Dry cleaning 

establishment 

Dwelling 

Elevator 

Fence 

Garage 

Greenhouse 

Hay... 

Hospital 

Hotel 

Incubator 

Junk shop 

Laundry 

Lodge hall 

Lumber pile 

Manufactory 

Office building — 

Pool room 

Post office 

Restaurant 

Schoolhouse 

Smokehouse 

Storage 

Store 

Theatre 

Traction car 

Total. 



Num- 
ber of 



2 
15 
4 
4 

7 

10 
2,767 

16 

3 

114 

2 

13 
2 

35 
1 
5 
8 
5 

20 
lu4 

33 
2 
1 

16 

45 

13 

50 
312 

16 
3 

4,510 



Value 

of 

Buildings 



$139,175 

85,060 

122,000 

135,000 

36,200 

743, 109 

3,975 

9,500 

67, 150 

30,000 

212,400 

91,000 

60,000 

41,125 

59,550 

,571,880 

128,000 

7,050 

65,985 

9,000 

2,010 

54,000 

1,567,000 

500 

8,250 

95,200 

29,900 

125,035 

9,538,077 

2,856,300 

3,250 

1,000 

178, 100 

1,262,600 

13,210 

483,575 

6,203,350 

668,500 

9,900 



$35,716, 



Value 

of 

Contents 



$10,260 

45,000 

57,400 

12,500 

5,000 

562,520 

4,200 

100 

1,600 



22,400| 

27,000 

9,100 

22,080? 

16,400 

2,662,776 

310,000 

600 

692,759 

4,000 

259 

17,000 

255,960 

150 

23,605 

149,000 

6.800 

199, 643 

9,884,253 

414,600 

2,200 



33,800 

216,100 

9,690 

422,458 

,455,905 

95,450 



$18,652,568 



Buildings 



$20,229 

4,890 

10,320 

14,610 

3,210 

611,097 

1,525 

1,000 

46,130 

115 

57,270 

545 

6,8251 



1,570 

,414,617 

181,705 

55 

138,680 

1,505 

1,902 

14,025 

21,985 

150 

4,600 

21,752 

4,625 

22,024 

446,276 

48,538 

1,260 

20 

2,937 

135,139 

2,610 

65,534 

258,055 

65,950 

145 



$3,633,725 



Contents 



$1,395 

55 

19,142 

5,100 

1,089 

378,337 

1,280 

80 

260 



6,925 
2,635 
3,800 

75 

4,875 

395,406 

91,599 

15 

175,224 

500 

259 

7,000 

5,270 

100 

4,810 

58,550 

1,650 

132,644 

870,042 

12,556 

400 



4,041 
23,841 
2,730 
136,079 
677,849 
13,490 



$3,039,103 



Insurance 

on 
Buildings 



Insurance 

on 
Contents 



$64,843 

74,875 

61,000 

97,500 

8,600 

342,903 

1,800 

3,000 

6,100 

27,500 

52,700 

36,000 

29,400 

2,675 

33,600 

5,778,374 

251,800 

2,000 

291,125 



500 

27,000 

1,114,000 



4,000 

45, 100 

19,000 

88,959 

2,812,585 



189,850 

750 

300 

83,800 

597,605 

6,100 

286,320 

753,202 

215,000 



$5,700 

26,000 

46, 100 

8,800 

2,500 

276, 960 

500 



6,750 

10,000 

4,500 

450 

12,500 

1,285,115 

110,200 

"259," 075 



8,000 
105,400 



6,000 
108,825 

7,000 
174,900 
,763,125 
244,740 



20,950 

85,320 

2,160 

268,976 

1,718,530 

197,500 



$17,416,466 



$8,766,812 



State Fire Marshal 



405 



TABLE IV 
PROPERTY AND CAUSE STATISTICS 



Property 


Number 
from 
each 
cause 


Partial 
Loss 


Total 
Loss 


Wood 


Brick 


Stone 






90 


4 










36 

17 
15 
14 

4 

2 
• 2 
1 
1 
1 
1 


































































































































6 


2 










5 

2 
1 


































12 




5 


7 






3 

3 
3 

2 

1 




















































Bank 


4 






4 






1 
1 
1 
1 














































6 


1 


1 


3 






3 
1 

1 






















































334 


347 


666 

Wood& 


11 

brick 3 


1 




286 

105 

66 

41 

25 

25 

22 

18 

15 

13 

11 

9 

7 

6 

5 

4 

4 

3 

2 

2 

2 

2 

1 
















































































































































































































































































































































Torch 














5 




5 








3 
1 


















Spark from chimney 













406 



Year Book 



TABLE IV— Continued 
PROPERTY AND CAUSE STATISTICS 



Property 


Number 
from 
each 
cause 


Partial 
Loss 


Total 
Loss 


Wood 


Brick 


Stone 


Boat 




3 




2 
Wood& 








1 

1 
1 


steel 1 


























6 


2 


8 








2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 




































































2 




Wood& 


brick 2 






2 






14 


1 


7 


8 






6 

2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 






































































































4 








4 




2 

1 
1 


































Club 


3 


1 


1 


3 






1 
1 

1 










































7 




5 


2 






1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 














































































10 




3 


7 






3 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 


























































































2,579 


188 


2,658 
Wood& 


101 
Brick 7 


1 




1,347 

314 

304 

118 

81 

67 

66 

42 

40 

37 

36 

33 

30 

25 

24 




























































































































































Incendiary 













State Fire Marshal 



m 



TABLE IV-Continued 
PROPERTY AND CAUSE STATISTICS 



Property 


Number 
from 
each 
cause 


Partial 
Loss 


Total 
Loss 


Wood 


Brick 


Stone 




18 

18 

18 

17 

14 

13 

13 

12 

10 

10 

7 

6 

6 

6 

5 

4 

4 

4 

3 

3 

2 

2 

2 

2 

1 

1 




























































































































































Torch 
























































































































Tramps 






























































11 


5 


15 


Wood& 
brick 1 






5 

5 


























































































3 




3 








2 

1 




















93 


21 


79 


35 






50 
16 
9 
9 
5 
5 
5 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 




































































































































































































Torch 














2 


Wood & 


1 
glass 1 








1 
1 






Defective stove 







408 



Year Book 



IV— Continued 
PROPERTY AND CAUSE STATISTIC* 



Property 


Number 
from 
each 
cause 


Partial 
Loss 


Total 

Loss 


Wood 


Bri k 


Stone 


Hay 




6 


7 










4 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 






































































1 


i 


2 








1 
1 


















Hotel 


34 


1 


18 
Wood & 


16 
brick 1 






12 
5 
3 
2 

2 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 






































































































































































1 




1 








1 








4 


1 


4 


1 






3 
1 
1 






























8 




1 


7 






4 

1 
1 

1 
1 






















































4 


1 


3 


2 






2 
2 
1 






























19 


1 


20 








8 
4 
2 

2 
1 

1 
1 




























































































137 


27 


56 
Wood & 


82 
brick 26 






40 
17 
16 
16 
7 
7 
6 
5 
5 
4 
4 
4 
4 




































































































































Incendiary 













State Fire Marshal 



409 



TABLE IV— Continued 
PROPERTY AND CAUSE STATISTICS 



Property 


Number 
from 
each 
cause 


Partial 
Loss 


Total 
Loss 


Y/ood 


Brick 


Stone 




3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 












































































































Torch 






























































31 


2 


14 


19 






9 
4 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 






















































































































































1 




































1 


1 


2 








1 
1 


















Post Office 


1 




1 






Torch 


1 








15 


1 


6 
Wood& 


9 
brick 1 






4 
2 
2 

2 








** 






































































































31 


14 


11 


34 






15 
9 
6 
4 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 






























































































































7 


6 


10 


3 






10 
2 
















Back fire 













410 



Year Book 



TABLE IV-Continued 
PROPERTY AND CAUSE STATISTICS 



Property 


Number 
from 
each 
cause 


Partial 
Loss 


Total 
Loss 


Wood 


Brick 


Stone 






36 


14 


37 


13 






25 
4 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
















Defective wiring 
















































































































































261 


51 


165 
Wood& 


144 
brick 3 






104 

24 

21 

19 

18 

13 

12 

10 

9 

7 

7 

7 

6 

6 

5 

5 

5 

3 

3 

3 

3 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 




























































































































































































































































































































































































































































16 






15 

brick 1 






6 
4 
4 
1 
1 




Wood & 


















































3 




3 








1 
1 
1 










































Total 


4,510 


3,810 


700 


3,816 


530 


2 







Wood and brick, 45 
Wood and steel, 1 
Wood and glass, 1 



State Fire Marshal 



411 



TABLE V 
TIRES OF UNKNOWN CAUSES 



Month 


Number of 
Losses 


Loss 




59 
56 
67 
72 
93 
54 
129 
81 
61 
98 
68 
74 


$238,767 00 




121,163 00 




284,984 00 




286,493 00 




392,306 00 




102,600 00 


July 


364,560 00 




158,783 00 




159,717 00 


October 


255,474 00 




278,672 00 




302,115 00 






Total 


912 


$2,945,634 00 







TABLE VI 
INCENDIARY FIRES 



Month 



January... 
February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . 
September 
October... 
November 
December. 

Total. 




$351,589 00 



412 



Year Book 



TABLE VII 
•STATISTICS FOR CITIES OF 4,000 OR MORE POPULATION' 



City 


Popula- 
tion 


Number 

of 

Fires 


Loss 

Per 

Capita 


Total 
Value of 
Property 


Total 
Damage to 
Property 


Total 

Insurance on 

Property 




4,172 

29,767 

9,079 

11,595 

5,391 

9,293 

10,962 

8,990 

9,901 

10,139 

4,762 

35,967 

24,277 

10,790 

85,264 

86,549 

11,585 

4,909 

4,796 

55,378 

9,525 

4,168 

6,345 

36,004 

6,183 

14,000 

314,194 

4,461 

10,098 

5,100 

30,067 

22,486 

15,158 

6,257 

5,845 

21,626 

6,711 

23,747 

4,895 

19,457 

15,195 

5,284 

36,524 

22,992 

14,458 

4,758 

12,410 

4,338 

5,958 

7,132 

26,765 

5,498 

7,348 

9,701 

70,983 

4,489 

4,086 

66,083 

4,507 

6,518 

17,210 

9,872 

5,478 

8,743 

10,145 

4,021 


28 
174 
47 
39 
35 
61 


$0 87 
26 
5 23 
5 80 
1 16 
5 24 


$129,725 

1,102,883 

572,603 

493,225 

70,000 

166,350 


$3,658 
8,017 

47,492 

67,315 
6,205 

48,716 


$97,469 




743,690 


Bedford 


207,462 




177,900 


Bluffton 


17,250 




28,237 








64 
71 

121 
34 

204 
41 
52 

567 

743 

71 

38 

9 

478 


26 

68 

2 46 

41 

2 87 
1 37 

33 

1 64 

1 23 

17 58 

3 46 
73 

1 41 


198,315 

1,456,870 

240,498 

123,125 

969,520 

1,068,802 

322,450 

3,189,365 

5,945,000 

396,234 

27,725 

16,400 

5,996,782 


2,401 

6,763 

25,000 

1,988 

103,420 

33,340 

3,597 

140,398 

106,970 

203,738 

17,000 

3,545, 

78,229^ 


53,615 




901,411 




191,800 




67,575 




699,900 


Elkhart 


563,359 




205,725 




1,854,230 




4,844,500 




126,025 


Franklin 


71,802 
8,000 


Gary 


3,898,440 








27 
14 
273 
27 
54 
3,148 
13 
31 


1 47 
1 79 
95 
43 
1 46 
4 03 
1 54 
1 03 


47,050 
98,680 
499,205 
125,000 
99,850 
12,110,783 
41,865 
96,880 


6,145 

9,569 
34,390 

2,686 

20,469 

1,267,550 

6,880 
10,435 


29,950 




40,800 




279,600 


Hartford City 


78,400 




65,410 


Indianapolis 


16,975,441 
17,800 




57,385 








203 
209 
114 

20 
48 


28 

1 52 

99 

56 

1 59 


4,412,850 

1,406,175' 

136, 195^ 

109,838* 

98,725 


8,539 
34,306 
15,127 
3,552 
9,310 


2,412,850 




569,100 




63,400 




66,200 




42,200 








15 

286 

48 

201 

131 

28 

216 

157 

92 

35 

150 

29 

15 

40 

207 

29 

26 

62 

651 


46 

71 

17 

4 34 

1 02 

1 54 

2 36 
1 69 
1 84 

47 
67 
74 
43 

1 35 
90 

14 48 
99 
40 

2 86 


27,074 

2,500,000 

154,900 

1,474,350 

138,950 

12,177 

2,605,370 

850,000 

404,152 

106,400 

558,465 

110,900 

58,300 

196,505 

580,555 

605,030 

72,895 

624,650 

13,353,753 


3,145 

17,000 

\ 857s 

84,609 

15,536 

8,171" 

86,378, 

38,9051 

26,681 

2,239 

8,367 

3,229 

2,596 

9,677* 

24,239 

79,649 

7,284 

3,884 

203,209 


10,100 




1,650,070 




47,830 




535,300 




64,450 




63,375 




664,200 




640,000 




223,100 




75,611 


Peru 


322,325 




96,233 




21,900 




86,498 




201,420 




38,995 




40,800 


Shelbyville 


356,000 




2,049,215 






Tell City 


14 
521 
30 
22 
131 
108 
35 
38 
22 
20 


16 64 

2 16 

53 

1 00 
8 28 
4 87 

2 39 
62 

4 44 
1 16 


141,265 

3,098,029 

105,300 

170,600 

1,019,200 

468,660 

936,200 

177,865 

135,200 

43,300 


67,996 
143,016 

2,430 

6,543 
142,611 
48,169 
13,122 

5,493 
45,107 

4,690 


104,175 




1,900,327 


Tipton 


49,800 




66,875 




533,200 




226,860 


Warsaw. 


613,500 
125,205 




53,900 




35,900 







•1920 Popluation Estimates— U. S. Census Bureau. 



State Fire Marshal 



413 



TABLE VIII 
LIGHTNING STATISTICS 



Month 


Number of 

Lightning 

Losses 


Loss 


January 














13 

6 

16 

22 

36 

26 

30 

7 

7 

2 


$17,649 
49,525 
22,673 
33,426 
74,571 
64,881 
54,345 
9,928 








July ■ 










13 125 




375 








Total 


165 


$340,498 





Total number of lightning ', 



165 



» Number of buildings not rodded 154 

Number of buildings rodded 11 

Barns struck by lightning • 106 

Barns in country struck by lightning : 98 — 92% 

Barns struck in country that had total loss 83 — 85% 

Loss to rodded buildings $13,580 

Loss to buildings not rodded 326 , 918 

Lightning losses in country 121 

Lightning loss in country $255,543 

TABLE IX 
STATISTICS FOR DISTRICTS OUTSIDE INCORPORATED CITIES AND TOWNS 



Cause 


Number of 
Fires 


Loss 




22 
1 
2 
8 
3 
5 
8 
106 
1 
1 
2 

10 
5 
1 
2 
3 
1 

28 
1 
3 

11 

13 

121 

8 

101 

14 

13 

3 

271 


$29,482 
700 






550 




19,991 




5,225 

9,995 

14,715 

220,373 










6,300 




38,000 




3,500 




10,688 




33,571 




47 




2,450 




4,250 
60 






104,474 




3,000 




4,753 




26,020 




10,681 
255,543 






8,426 




166,967 




52,431 




378,436 




16,400 




888,374 




1,850 






Total - 


769 


$2,317,252 







Number of total losses. . , 
Number of partial losses . 



448 
321 



414 Year Book 

financial report 

For Period from October 1, 1921, to October 1, 1922 

Total amount of warrants $54,989 il 

Salaries — Fire Marshal, deputies and clerks $28,345 40 

Transportation 3,827 28 

Hotel expense and meals 3,789 75 

Automobile and livery hire 1,189 08 

Telegraph and telephone 881 74 

Postage „ 390 78 

Freight or express . 7 46 

Office supplies, stationery and printing 2,571 20 

Witness fees 129 67 

Expense of witnesses 940 11 

Assistants' fees 1,463 34 

Extradition expense 77 04 

Obtaining evidence 1,021 46 

Special services 10,365 60 

$54,999 91 

Received from the Governor's Fund for September salaries $1,228 32 

* 

ARSON INVESTIGATION DIVISION 

Following is a report, in tabulated form, showing results obtained 
by the Arson Division for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1922: 

Fires investigated 274 

Incendiary 41 

Confessions 19 

Cases filed '. 33 

Convicted 22 

Acquitted 2 

Dismissals 4 

Jury disagreements 

Pending in court for trial „ . 33 

Unknown (suspicious) 116 

Unknown (careless or accidental) 117 

The work of this division has increased over that of any previous 
year. This increase may be accounted for in two ways, first by the 
fact that there have been more fires of a suspicious or incendiary origin, 
and second by the fact that more guilty persons, habitually committing 
the crime of arson, have been apprehended. 



REPORT OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION OF 

INDIANA 



THE COMMISSION 

MRS. ELIZABETH CLAYPOOL EARL, Muncie, President— Term Ex- 
pires 1924. 

C. H. OLDFATHER, Crawfordsville, Vice-President — Term Expires 
1922. 

THOMAS C. HOWE, Indianapolis— Term Expires 1923. 

THE EXECUTIVE STAFF 

WILLIAM J. HAMILTON, Secretary and State Organizer (Resigned 

October, 1922). 
DELLA FRANCES NORTHEY, Supervisor, School and Institution 

Libraries, and Acting Secretary. 
HARRIET R. ROOT, Assistant State Organizer (Resigned September 

1, 1922). 
WINNIFRED WENNERSTRUM, Assistant State Organizer. 
MAYME C. SNIPES, Assistant State Organizer (Resigned September 

1, 1922). 
JEAN M. SEXTON, Assistant State Organizer. 
NELLIE K. FREE, in Charge of Traveling Libraries. 
ELIZABETH B. NOEL, Stenographer and Assistant. 
RUTH F. STEVENS, Assistant (Resigned September 1, 1922). 
MABEL R. McCOLGIN, Assistant. 
CARL ZIMMERMAN, Shipping Clerk. 

THE PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 

The General Assembly of Indiana at its 1899 session, established 
the Public Library Commission as a department of the state govern- 
ment which should aid and supervise the public libraries of the state. 
The aim of the commission is the development of local public libraries and 
the progress of the public library as an institution throughout Indiana. 

The work of the Public Library Commission is threefold. It en- 
courages and aids the establishment of new public libraries in com- 
munities where they are needed and where they can be supported. Sec- 
ondly, it assists in the development and growth of library service already 
established, aiming to reach the residents of rural districts near exist- 
ing libraries by means of township or county extension of library privi- 
leges. The third phase of the commission's work is its Traveling Library 
Department. While the commission is not a library, has not facilities 
for reference work, and loans no books to individuals, such service being 
rendered by the Indiana State Library, the Traveling Library Depart- 
ment of the commission does send out libraries of fifty or one hundred 
volumes to groups of citizens, schools, churches, and clubs located in 
communities which have no public library facilities. 

(415) 



416 Year Book 

work with public libraries 

A large share of the wortc of the commission in earlier years was 
the establishment of new libraries under the Mummert Public Library 
Act of 1901. There were but fifty-seven public libraries in the state in 
1899, where today we have 230, yet the calls for commission assistance 
are as numerous as before. This is due to the fact that our assistance 
is needed so much more in libraries in smaller communities, and calls 
are more frequent, as such libraries become more numerous. A heavy 
correspondence is carried on with librarians, library trustees and others 
interested. This supplements the personal visits of the staff and gives 
to those in need counsel based on experience and research in matters of 
library administration and policy. 

FIELD WORK 

ESTABLISHMENT OF NEW LIBRARIES 

Members of the Public Library Commission staff visit towns wher- 
ever there is need of a library. They confer with citizens and organi- 
zations which are interested in the need, explain the steps to be taken 
to establish a library and finally advise as to a campaign. Often con- 
ference with representative citizens in towns where no interest is evi- 
dent, will result in the awakening of interest. Three new tax-supported 
libraries and seven community libraries without tax support, were estab- 
lished during the year. 

As soon as a library board has been legally appointed, a represen- 
tative of the commission plans to meet with and help the new board to 
organize, to adopt working by-laws, and to plan for the actual service 
from the library. The initial conference is followed by other meetings 
and correspondence which keeps the commission in touch with later de- 
velopments in the local situation. 

ORGANIZATION VISITS 

The services of a commission organizer are given in libraries start- 
ing service to arrange the books and start the necessary records, to 
install a loan system and instruct the new librarian. Collections vary 
in size from 500 'volumes to 5,000, and the organizer, with the librarian 
and other volunteers, helps accession, classifies and labels the volumes, 
making a card shelf -list in which each book is represented by a card filed 
so that all books on a subject stand together. The organizer does not 
make a dictionary catalog for the library; this may be left until the 
librarian has had summer school training in library work or the library 
board may hire a temporary cataloger. All the expenses of such visits 
to public libraries are met by the commission. 

ADVISORY VISITS 

The most important work done by the commission, and the richest 
in results, is that accomplished by visits of the members of the staff to 
the public libraries in all parts of the state. The aid of these "traveling 



Public Library Commission 417 

libraries" is especially needed in the towns where the library income is 
too small to allow the hiring of a trained librarian. 

The librarians are helped by discussing new methods and possibili- 
ties with an organizer of wide experience. The organizer can advise on 
many points and give suggestions which will make the librarian's time 
and energy more productive of results for the community. These visi- 
tors passing from one library to another suggest methods which have 
been successful elsewhere and prevent experiments which have already 
been proven unwise. 

The library boards too are glad of an opportunity to consult an 
experienced visitor as to means of bettering service and equipment. 
This is more than ever true under the present stress of finances. Even 
in the larger cities we find boards who wish information on problems 
which other libraries may already have solved. .Policies are discussed, 
the problems of library extension to rural districts, salaries and staff 
questions, questions of law and building equipment, budget problems as 
to how best to apportion funds so as to meet the needs of that particu- 
lar community. 

HIGH SCHOOLS 

There are in Indiana about 600 high schools in communities which 
do not have public library privileges. The students in these schools are 
just as much in need of books and reading as those in other communities. 
The State Department of Public Instruction requires a "working library" 
for each high school to which it grants a certificate. Accordingly, each 
school has a "library" — sometimes forty or fifty volumes in deplorable 
physical condition and sometimes two or three thousand volumes form- , 
ing a fairly adequate collection. 

The Public Library Commission feels a responsibility for aiding all 
library movements within the state and is glad to help the school libra- 
ries in placing their collections in shape. The employment as a mem- 
ber of the staff of a supervisor of school libraries is making possible 
unusual co-operation between public libraries and school service as well 
as between the two departments of the state government most inter- 
ested. 

LIBRARY INSTRUCTION 

Each summer the commission conducts a six weeks' course in library 
technique for librarians and their assistants. Only persons holding po- 
sitions or under appointment in Indiana libraries are accepted as stu- 
dents. This course is not conducted as a library school, but simply gives 
the rudiments of library practice to untrained assistants. 

The commission also supervises each spring about fifteen district 
conferences of the Indiana Library Association. At these the librarians 
and trustees of a given section of the state meet to discuss their mutual 
problems and to talk over new methods. Some representative of the 
commission is present at each meeting. 

PUBLICATIONS 

The commission issues quarterly The Library Occurrent. This con- 
tains articles and lists intended to be of special help to the librarians of 

27—22978 



418 Year Book 

the state. The commission also distributed free last year, The Booklist 
of the American Library Association to sixty-three small libraries in the 
state having an income of less than $1,500 per year. The Booklist con- 
tains titles and notes of the worthwhile new books appearing each 
month. 

FREE TRAVELING LIBRARIES 

Any school, club, grange, or other organization of five or more 
members not having access to a public library may borrow the traveling 
library books. 

Any five or more persons not already organized and not having 
access to a public library may organize a Traveling Library Associa- 
tion for this purpose. 

If a public library is small and unable to furnish the books needed, 
the librarian may borrow books from the traveling library to supple- 
ment the public library collection, provided an adequate tax levy is 
made in the town, and provided the library co-operate with the commis- 
sion by filing the annual report required by law. 

Collections of a general character are lent for three months and 
may be once renewed. 

Collection to be used for study in club work may be had for the 
club year. 

The number of books lent to any one association depends upon the 
number of borrowers in the association, and the number of books avail- 
able when the request is made. If the circulation of the books in any 
association justifies a larger collection more books will be sent later if 
desired. 

T"or special study the number of books needed to cover the work will 
be sent if possible. 

Books that go by freight are sent collect and must be returned pre- 
paid. A fee of 50 cents on the first box and 30 cents on each additional 
box in the same shipment must be paid in advance to the Public Library 
Commission for expense of drayage to and from the station at Indiana- 
polis. 

Books that are sent by express are sent collect and must be re- 
turned paid. 

SUMMARY OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION WORK 

October 1, 1921, to September 30, 1922. 

Four hundred twenty-five visits made by Public Library Commission 
staff. 

Two hundred seven public libraries of Indiana visited. 

One hundred twenty-one school and institution library visits made. 

Twenty-three libraries received organization help. 

Eleven new towns obtaining library service. 

Four new townships served under township support for libraries, 
act of 1911. 

One new county (Bartholomew) served under county library act of 
1917. 



Public Library Commission 419 

Fourteen district meetings of the Indiana Library Association 
planned for and attended by the commission staff. 

Forty students instructed in summer school for librarians. 

Thirty-three thousand one hundred twenty-six volumes circulated by 
Traveling Library Department (a gain of two hundred eighty-nine). 

Two hundred thirteen associations served by Traveling Library De- 
partment. 

Sixty-nine new stations served by Traveling Library Department. 

LOCAL LIBRARY SUCCESS DEPENDS ON FUNDS 

General library problems in Indiana have been almost non-existent 
during the past year. Most of those which exist can be solved by library 
boards with real vision of their needs and responsibilities. If a library 
is worth having, it is worth paying for. No other public service is being 
maintained at such a low rate. As long as librarians and library trus- 
tees acquiesce in crippling service to the public in order to save pennies, 
just so long will the taxpayer regard the institution without respect. 

The library board which sets its rate where it must be in order to 
hire efficient trained service, will have little trouble with the taxpayer, 
for the bettered service will plead its own cause. Last year only five 
library tax rates were protested by taxpayers, this year only three, yet 
of the remaining 207 tax-supported libraries, how few are serving their 
communities as they should, and how few have asked for the rate they 
need to give first class service. Indiana is the only state in the Union 
where library boards with a knowledge of local conditions may fix their 
tax rate, and there is no excuse for second and third class libraries, and 
no explanation except lethargy on the part of librarians and library 
trustees. 

NEEDED LEGISLATION 

To a less degree, this is true of the libraries in our smaller commu- 
nities where a large part of the institution's support must be obtained 
by a levy made by the township advisory board. It would be well if leg- 
islation could be obtained which would place in the hands of a library 
board representing town and township the right to fix the township 
library tax as they already have the right to fix town and county library 
rates. 

Another bit of library legislation needed is a slight change in the 
county law which would plainly specify as a taxing district the portions 
of a county served by a public library under the county act of 1917. 
This would protect libraries which do not serve the entire county like 
Rochester, Fowler and Logansport from anti-library campaigns in in- 
dividual townships like that from which Noblesville suffered a year ago. 

The third change in the present statutes which would be advantage- 
ous is that which would make it possible for the governing board of a 
public library maintained under some other law to turn over that library 
to a library board organized under the law of 1901 without waiting for 
approval or action of the city council. The school board of one of our 
Indiana towns desired to thus relinquish control of the local public li- 
brary this past year, but the city council refused to permit it on the 



420 Year Book 

ground that though the maximum library tax is exactly the same in 
either case, the reorganization would increase the civil city's burdens 
and decrease the school city's, as if the same taxpayers were not sup- 
porting both communities, and the change meant anything but better 
service. 

THE COMMISSION'S WORK 

The increased appropriation of the 1921 legislature has made the 
work very much simpler and more effective. For the first time in years 
the Traveling Library Department has not run out of fiction and juve- 
niles in mid-winter, while new steel stacks have materially relieved the 
summer congestion of returned books. With the increased staff, the 
organizers were able to pay a large number of additional visits to school 
and public libraries. In certain instances the salaries are still not high 
enough to obtain the strongest service, but conditions are better than 
formerly. 

WORK WITH SCHOOLS 

The Public Library Commission has been able to give to the libra- 
ries of the schools of the state more help and attention than has ever 
been done befort. The employment of a mature experienced woman to 
supervise the school work has proved the most profitable investment the 
commission could have made. Both the schools and the public libraries 
are stronger, while the co-operation between the Public Library Com- 
mission and the Department of Public Instruction are very much more 
intimate than ever before. 

In all, one hundred school libraries have been visited and in addi- 
tion eighteen more have been organized or reorganized. It is unfor- 
tunately true that school libraries once organized do not stay in condi- 
tion, but the lapse of two or three years with the incidental changes in 
the teaching staff usually results in the disintegration of any system of 
library records. For this reason, it has been thought wise instead of 
putting efforts into organizing individual libraries, to work on the 
county unit basis this coming year. Surveys of all the high school libra- 
ries in a given county, the acquaintance with the entire teaching group 
and the county supervisors, will form a much more effective method of 
reaching the state than continued and reiterated efforts with the indi- 
vidual schools. 

Such a system of work will be extremely advantageous to the de- 
velopment of county library systems, and Miss Northey's familiarity 
and sympathy with county libraries makes her a splendid field worker. 
During the past year' five counties were thus surveyed — Fulton, Benton, 
Randolph, Jefferson and Switzerland. The school results in Fulton and 
Benton Counties and the aid given the county libraries in Rochester and 
Fowler were particularly noteworthy. In Randolph County the work 
was carried on in connection with the general school survey of the state, 
and the investigation showed a remarkable appreciation of county li- 
brary possibilities on the part of the rural districts and a keen regret 
that the Winchester library has been as yet unwilling to expand its field. 

The school libraries organized during the year are those at Auburn, 
Bremen, Chrisney, Dupont, Eaton, Fowler, Fulton, Gilboa, Grass Creek, 

.J 



Public Library Commission 421 

Kewanna, Lawrenceburg, Manilla, Moores Hill, New Lisbon, Itaub, 
Ryker's Ridge, Straughn and Wadena. For the coming year fifteen 
county superintendents have already asked that their schools be cov- 
ered and the commission will attempt to do these as well as to give help 
by correspondence to individual schools applying. 

An interesting feature of Miss Northey's work has been the week's 
course in instruction in the use of books and libraries given to the senior 
teachers in the summer normal schools at Danville and Winona Lake. 
A similar course was offered to all present at the Randolph County 
Teachers Institute in August. 

The co-operation of the commission has been sought in recommenda- 
tions for required and approved reading lists to be passed on by the 
State Board of Education. The commission also aided the committee of 
librarians who made recommendations to the Young People's Reading 
Circle Board in the hope that a stronger group of titles might be chosen 
by the board, and that no mediocre books might be selected. The board's 
final selection showed that the librarians' recommendations have been 
given weight. Fifteen of the twenty-three titles appeared on the list 
of preliminary recommendations. 

During the past year the stronger staff of the Public Library Com- 
mission has been able to make 425 library visits in the state as against 
282 the year before. One hundred eighteen of these were to school libra- 
ries, 294 to public libraries in 207 cities. Of the twenty-three libraries 
unvisited, only eight lie south of the National Road, while seven of these 
were visited the first week of the new fiscal year, only Borden and Mos- 
cow remaining. Undoubtedly our record would have been nearly a per- 
fect one if it had not been for the resignations of Miss Snipes and Miss 
Root, September 1st, and the impossibility of getting their successors 
at once. 

Twenty-seven of the public library visits were conferences with li- 
brary boards to discuss and advise as to local problems and service. 
Five were campaign visits for library establishment or extension, while 
twenty-three were for the purpose of organizing or reorganizing library 
book collections. Miss Harriet Root and Miss Delia Frances Northey 
were both on the program of the American Library Association Con- 
ference at Detroit in June. 

LIBRARY ORGANIZATION 

In addition to the eighteen school libraries organized, the commis- 
sion organized six new public library collections. These organization 
visits varied from three days to a week, depending on the size of the 
collection, the ability of the librarian and the help obtainable for the 
mechanical work of pocketing and accessioning the books. The training 
of the new librarian is always a vital part of such an organization 
visit. The libraries thus assisted were Linden and North Judson in new 
Carnegie buildings, Edinburg and Huntingburg tax supported libraries 
in rented quarters, and Farmland and Spiceland, little community libra- 
ries supported by volunteer gifts. 



422 ¥ear Book 

new libraries 

Five new libraries have levied a library tax this year, Bristol, Bug- 
ger, Jasonville, Huntingburg and West Lafayette. Bristol, Dugger and 
Huntingburg already possess reading rooms, that in Dugger being 
opened last November by the Community Welfare Association, while that 
in Huntingburg has been maintained since June 20th by the new Public 
Library Board from the subscription campaign which preceded the 
board's organization. Bristol was formerly served as a station of the 
Elkhart library, but when the question arose of levying a tax on the 
township in return for the service, the town was unwilling to continue 
the co-operation. The commission advised strongly the manifesSt ad- 
vantages of co-operative service as part of a large well organized sys- 
tem, but the community insisted on independence. A five-cent tax was 
levied and a book shower brought in 3,000 volumes, the reading room 
being opened in November in quarters granted by the town board. The 
West Lafayette Library Board was organized last December and as the 
subscriptions pledged before the board's organization are largely col- 
lected now, the board is planning to open a reading room soon in quar- 
ters provided by the town council. In Jasonville the town council vol- 
untarily made the library tax levy without any active campaign. There 
is therefore no fund available for the immediate support of a reading 
room, but plans are under way for obtaining funds and the council will 
provide the location. 

The Edinburg Library Board which was organized a year ago, 
opened its reading room in December and has done very good work. 
The Fairmont library which has levied a small tax for the past two 
years, has been unable to obtain township co-operation, but hopes to 
open a town reading room after the first of the year. 

New community libraries not supported by taxation have been estab- 
lished at Burnettsville, Farmland, Hope, Spiceland, Williamsburg, Win- 
gate and Wolcott. It is hoped that several of these may later serve as 
stations of county library systems. 

Plans for library service were discussed in Petersburg, Russellville, 
West Terre Haute and Winslow during the year, but no definite results 
developed. 

LIBRARY NEEDS 

The establishment of the Huntingburg public library in Dubois 
County leaves only two counties in the state without publiic libraries — 
Pike containing the towns of Petersburg and Winslow, and Crawford 
containing English, Leavenworth, Marengo and Milltown. 

The Federal Census Bureau sets 2,500 population as the boundary 
line between urban and rural communities. Indiana has only three cities 
and towns with a larger population without public libraries. These are 
Bicknell (population 7,365), West Terre Haute (population 4,307), and 
Jasper (population 2,539). West Terre Haute will do better by not 
establishing an independent library, but by levying a tax to make pos- 
sible service from the Terre Haute library. The Terre Haute Library 
and School Board has offered to give service to the suburb as soon as 
such a tax may be levied. 



Public Library Commission 423 

Four towns with populations between 2,000 and 2,500 still lack libra- 
ries. These are Batesville, population 2,361; Bremen, population 2,084; 
Loogootee, population 2,335, and Petersburg, population 2,367. Five 
towns between 1,500 and 2,000 are also without libraries — Beech Grove, 
population 1,500; Berne, population 1,537; Hymera, population 1,599; 
Shelburn, population 1,814, and Veedersburg, population 1,580. 

The property valuation figures of some of these twelve "library- 
less" towns is interesting, as showing how unnecessary it is that an 
educational asset like the public library should be neglected in com- 
munities of this sort. Six of these towns have a property valuation of 
over two million dollars, thus making possible a library tax of over, 
$2,000 from the towns themselves without any township co-operation. 
The six wealthiest towns in Indiana still without public libraries are 
Bicknell, valuation 1921, $4,552,190; Beech Grove, valuation, $3,246,460; 
Berne, valuation, $2,672,290; Batesville, valuation, $2,307,380; Jasper, 
valuation, $2,092,455, and Bremen, valuation, $2,091,896. 

NEW BUILDINGS 

The last of the before-the-war donations of the Carnegie Corpora- 
tion has now been utilized, three new library buildings having been 
thrown open during the year. These new buildings house the public 
libraries at Hebron, Linden and North Judson. Hebron and Linden 
were each granted $7,500 by the corporation and North Judson received 
$10,000. All three, however, added local gifts and the buildings were 
erected at an approximate cost of $14,000 each. 

LIBRARY GIFTS 

The town of Bourbon, Marshall County, was given $12,000 for a 
library building by the late William Erwin, who was keenly interested 
in a library campaign in Bourbon several years ago. As yet no steps 
have been taken to organize a library board and take advantage of the 
gift. 

The outstanding library gift of the year was $150,000, left to the 
Indiana Historical Society for a library building and endowment by the 
late Delavan Smith. The town of Waldron, Shelby County, was men- 
tioned in the will of the late James Curtis as a residuary legatee for 
$50,000 for a public library building, but it is doubtful whether any 
funds will finally be available. The late Judge Howe left to the Frank- 
lin public library one-third of his estate amounting to about $25,000. 
This is to be held in trust for some years pending the death of other 
beneficiaries, but will ultimately form a splendid endowment for the 
library. A $6,000 gift to the Fort Wayne public library and $5,000 to 
the Indianapolis public library should also be mentioned. 

The West Lebanon library was also offered a $5,000 gift, but only 
on condition that the library which was erected by a Carnegie gift, be 
renamed after the new patron. The sum will only net a small portion 
of the income the library will need. The patron refused a request from 
the library board to permit the use of the funds as a book endowment 
of a memorial collection. The library board refused to accept the dona- 
tion on these terms. 



424 Year Book 

RURAL EXTENSION WORK 

COUNTY LIBRARIES 

The principal point of interest is the new county library tax voted 
by Bartholomew County for service from the Columbus public library. 
This problem has been before the two communities for a number of 
years and it is anticipated that a better service will result because of 
the thorough understanding reached by both parties to the agreement. 

TOWNSHIP EXTENSION WORK 

Four new townships receiving service are to be recorded for this 
year. Auburn which has been serving a neighboring township for sev- 
eral years has now received a tax from its own township, Union. Lin- 
ton also receives its first tax from Stockton Township. A five-cent rate 
was granted which will yield about $1,700. Stockton Township is one 
of the most populous in the state, containing a large community really 
part of Linton, but outside the corporation line. Washington and Pa- 
toka Townships are co-operating with Bristol and Huntingburg. 

Fairfield Township which was reported last year as joining Brook- 
ville, did not after all levy the tax it promised. The Brookville library 
relying on the promise of township authorities to make the levy this 
year conducted a station free for a year, only to have the authorities go 
back on their word and refuse to pay for the service they had already 
received. 

A report of difficulty at Brookston has been received, but details 
are lacking so that we do not know whether the co-operation has actually 
been discontinued or not. 

Our records now show 199 townships obtaining library service from 
158 different public libraries. The new county library at Columbus will 
serve fourteen more townships and with the other county libraries, makes a 
total of 312 townships receiving library service out of the 1,017 in the 
state. Fortunately, these 312 are the most populous, containing over 
two million inhabitants as against less than one million in the other 705. 

BOOK WAGONS 

The newest book wagon in the state, that at Rochester, for Fulton 
County service, was put into service in March. This is a different type 
from the others in the state in that the books are shelved inside the car 
and the patrons enter to make their selection. It will be more comfort- 
able in cold weather. Evansville is also contemplating a book wagon for 
Vanderburg County patrons. 

INDIANA LIBRARY WEEK, APRIL 23-29, 1922 

One of the outstanding events in the state's library history was a 
week of concentrated publicity emphasizing the value of local library 
service and celebrated simultaneously all over the state. More than 
three-quarters of the libraries in Indiana took part in this campaign 
and the results obtained were very gratifying. 



Public Library Commission 425 

The suggestion for the campaign was presented by Edmund L. 
Craig of Evansville, at the Indiana Library Trustees Association meet- 
ing in November and at once endorsed by both the Indiana Library Trus- 
tees Association and the Indiana Library Association. The executive 
management of the campaign was placed with a committee consisting 
of Mrs. W. A. Denny of Anderson, Miss Winifred Ticer of Huntington, 
Charles E. Rush and Miss Gretta Smith of the Indianapolis public li- 
brary, and the secretary of the Public Library Commission. 

Publicity material was sent out by the committee to the libraries of 
the state, the cost about $80, being borne jointly by the two library asso- 
ciations. The mimeograph work was donated by the Indianapolis pub- 
lic library. 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

During the past few years the summer school schedule has been 
very crowded, so that it was decided this summer to expand the course 
to seven weeks. Forty students took the work, and all but one of the 
thirty-nine completing the course, received a passing grade. Of these 
students one was a library trustee, seven were librarians, and thirty-two 
assistants. The importance of this instruction to assistants is proven 
by the fact that by October 1st, three more of the assistants had become 
librarians of their respective libraries. 

The Y. W. C. A. repeated their courtesy of last year and once more 
permitted the use of their educational rooms as a dormitory for thirty 
students. The Indianapolis School Board likewise co-operated in permit- 
ting us to use three rooms in Shortridge High School for the classes, 
while the Indianapolis public library helped materially in the reference 
course by giving the students the use of all works needed. 

The general courses were given by members of the commission staff, 
with Miss Carrie E. Scott of the Indianapolis public library, presenting 
ten lectures on work with children and Mrs. Julia S. Harron of the 
Cleveland public library, giving a similar number on book selection. In 
addition, seventeen other speakers gave talks on various phases of li- 
brary work. A reunion luncheon was held for the summer school classes 
of 1902, 1907, 1912 and 1917, at which representatives of the classes of 
1902 and 1912 spoke to the class of 1922 on features of the work in 
which they have been specially successful. 

Through the summer school, the commission has succeeded in reach- 
ing all parts of the state with instruction. There are very few libraries 
in Indiana which have not had librarians or assistants trained by us. 
Starting with the class of 1901, 648 persons have taken the work besides 
thirty-three who have taken the advanced course occasionally offered by 
the commission. 

It must be emphasized that this course is not in any way a sub- 
stitute for a course in a regular library school. It is not a library 
school at all, merely an apprentice's course of instruction in funda- 
mentals to assistants already employed by libraries of the state. We 
are unable and unwilling to accept as students young people seeking a 
short cut to employment as librarians. They will get the best start only 
through a year's study in one of the accredited schools. 



426 Year Book 

The young women who made up the 1922 class were : 

Jane B. Aspinall, Assistant, Plymouth (now Librarian). 

Blanche Barr, Librarian, Spencer. 

Bernis Bartholomew, Assistant, Goshen. 

Blanche Bemish, Assistant, North Vernon. 

Ruth Bills, Assistant, Columbia City. 

Edna Bollinger, Assistant, North Manchester. 

Regina L. Coker, Assistant, Evansville. 

Erma Cox, Assistant, Martinsville (now Librarian). 

Ruth M. Cox, Librarian, Thorntown. 

Mrs. Mary L. Davis, Librarian, Lowell. 

Lois Gross, Assistant, Gary. 

Mildred C. Hall, Assistant, Fowler. 

Maude Harmon, Assistant, Frankfort. 

Nellie G. Harper, Librarian, Madison. 

Lois Henze, Assistant, Elwood. 

Dorothy E. Hiatt, Assistant, Indianapolis. 

Sara M. Hill, Assistant, Rockport (now Librarian). 

Mildred B. Jamison, Assistant, Gary. 

Hazel Lett, Assistant, Washington. 

Elinor Meyers, Assistant, Gary. 

Wilma Miller, Assistant, Marion. 

Jane M. North, Librarian, Rising Sun. 

Anna M. Nye, Trustee, Lynn (4 weeks' work). 

Leah J. Power, Assistant, Warsaw. 

Valla Ridens, Assistant, Evansville. 

Mary E. Schmitt, Assistant, Seymour. 

Freda Silver, Assistant, Evansville. 

Lucile Slater, Assistant, Hartford City. 

Velma E. Snider, Assistant, Huntington. 

Helen M. Stone, Assistant, Mooresville. 

Edith Switzer, Assistant, Logansport. 

Mary L. Taylor, Assistant, South Bend. 

Mabel Wallace, Librarian, Orleans. 

Mildred Wallace, Assistant, Evansville. 

Mrs. Josephine Walling, Librarian, Pennville. 

Mrs. Alice M. Weeks, Assistant, Auburn. 

Ethel Willis, Assistant, Crawfordsville. 

Naomi H. Wolter, Assistant, South Bend. 

Florence A. Wood, Assistant, New Albany. 

Ruth I. Young, Assistant, Hammond. 

LIBRARY MEETINGS 

Fourteen district meetings of the Indiana Library Association were 
held during the first five months of the year at Aurora, Cambridge City, 
Columbia City, Danville, 111. (joint meeting with libraries of eastern 
Illinois), Frankfort, Franklin, Greencastie, Marion, Mishawaka, Orleans, 
Princeton, Rochester, Tell City and Whiting. The Public Library Com- 
mission has a large share in the preparation of the programs for these 
meetings. This aid is important for the meetings, bringing together 
librarians and library trustees to talk over their mutual problems, give 
profitable impetus to library progress in the state. 

The meetings of the Indiana Library Trustees at Hotel Severin, 
November 17th to 19th, and of the Indiana Library Association at Hotel 
Roberts, Muncie, October 26th to 28th, were very successful and well 
attended. The presiding officers of the two organizations were Edmund 
L. Craig of Evansville, and Miss Mary Torrance of Muncie. The presi- 



Public Library Commission 427 

dents elected for the ensuing year who will preside at the joint meeting 
of the two associations in November, 1922, are Mrs. W. A. Denny of 
Anderson, for the Indiana Library Trustees Association, and Miss Wini- 
fred Ticer of Huntington, for the Indiana Library Association. Miss 
Ticer's removal from the state and subsequent resignation, will leave 
her place to be taken by Miss Alice D. Stevens of Logansport, the Indi- 
ana Library Association vice-president. 

TRAVELING LIBRARIES 

An increase of 9.5 per cent was shown in the circulation from the 
Traveling Libraries Department over last year's figures. The advance 
from eighty-five requests from general reading groups to 127, and from 
119 from schools to 143, is gratifying. This increase is made in spite 
of a decrease of almost 2,000 volumes in loans to public libraries. We 
have endeavored for several years to discourage libraries from borrow- 
ing books from the commission when they should be building up their 
own collections. Of the seventy-one libraries aided, only forty borrowed 
traveling library collections. The other thirty-one received only small 
loans of books for special needs. There are, of course, many libraries 
among the fifty in communities of less than 1,000 which will continue to 
need help, but we aim to develop local initiative and responsibility. 

To the thirteen counties of the state served by county libraries, no 
traveling library collections are sent except to the library. Of the others, 
traveling libraries were sent to all but nine, DeKalb, Delaware, Floyd, 
Lake, Madison, Miami, Monroe, Tippecanoe and Tipton. Six of these 
had no libraries the year before, Delaware, Floyd, Lake (only one town- 
ship not receiving service from some public library) , Miami, Monroe and 
Tippecanoe. Floyd and Miami have had no libraries for three years 
and Tippecanoe for four. 

TRAVELING LIBRARY DEPARTMENT STATISTICS, 1922 REPORT 

October 1, 1921, to September 30, 1922 

1921-22 1920-21 

New stations 69 71 

Total number requests filled — 

Initial loans 345 336 

Renewals 192 161 

537 497 

Total volumes lent— 1921-22 1920-21 

Initial loans 18,285 19,608 

Renewals • 14,841 10,627 

33,126 30,235 

Traveling library statistics by associations: 

Traveling library statistics by associations: 

Associations Requests Volumes 

Public libraries 71* 216 12,472 

Reading rooms 4 5 412 

Rural 5 7 438 

General reading 51 127 9,872 



428 Year Book 

Clubs 12 39 611 

Schools 70 143 9,321 



213 537 33,126 



*40 borrowed traveling- libraries. 
31 borrowed special small loans. 

FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 

October 1, 1921, to September 30, 1922 

Personal service $13,288 04 

Salaries 

Wages, shipping clerk and extra help 

Special payments — Summer school lecturers 

Contractual service 3,731 80 

General repairs — Typewriters and multigraph 

Traveling expenses 

Transportation — Express, etc 

Communication — Postage', telephone, etc 

Printing and binding — Printing (not supplies), Occurrent, etc. 

Book repairing 

Other service — Dues and clippings 

Supplies 747 47 

Office — Stationery, etc 

Educational — Periodicals 

Distributions, booklists and pamphlets 

Equipment 3,472 21 

Office — Stacks, files, etc 

Educational — Traveling library books 

$21,239 52 $21,239 52 

In closing this last annual report, the present secretary desires to 
express his appreciation of the many courtesies shown him by the li- 
brarians and library trustees of Indiana. Especially helpful has been 
the confidence and assistance of the members of the Public Library Com- 
mission. To the librarians and staffs of the Indiana State Library and 
the Indianapolis Public Library we are indebted for many favors and 
constant aid whenever we have asked it. Finally, the loyal co-operation, 
the friendly spirit and the earnest efforts of his fellow workers on the 
commission staff merit the secretary's keenest appreciation. 



$12,436 


68 


502 


36 


349 


00 


25 


00 


1,592 


60 


57 


44 


523 


62 


733 


96 


724 


18 


75 


00 


490 


39 


76 


45 


180 


63 


1,043 


18 


2,429 


03 



430 



Year Book 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

The list which follows includes all public libraries in Indiana supported wholly or in part by local commun 
the calendar year 1921. A supplementary list arranged by population is appended, which will prove useful for 



City or Town 


Name of Librarian 


a 
.2 

J$ £ 
3 o 

§^ 


1 

13 
& 


1 

.a 
§ 

"SO 
Q 


•Law 




Mrs. E. H. Ferry 


930 
1,142 


1,803 
1,792 


1912 
1914 




2 Albion. . . 


































4,172 
29,767 
2,650 

678 
3,335 
4,650 
4,299 

125 
9,076 


2,689 
2,910 
1,374 
4,574 

556 
1,204 

556 
1,302 
3,721 


1895 
1891 
1914 
1916 
1902 
1906 
1902 
1920 
1897 








































10 Avon (Danville R. F. D.) . . . 


Nellie Gorrell 


1899 


11 Bedford 












12 Bloomfield 


1,872 
11,595 


1,581 
3,215 


1905 
1912 
















14 Bluffton 


5,39i 

4,451 

333 

880 

9,293 

568 

975 

'"'815' 
2,220 
1,063 


"2,'806" 
926 
544 
524 
505 
1,413 

i, ii3 

1,722 
1,580 


1902 
1911 
1914 
1910 
1875 
1921 
1910 

1915 

1910 
1916 










16 Borden 






17 Boswell 






18 Brazil 






19 Bristol 






20 Brook 


Ethel Reed 










22 Brookville 




















1,544 
1,745 


"2,'960' 


1910 
1906 




25 Butler 
































26 Cambridge City 


1,963 


2,754 


1913 












2,008 
973 

598 


"2,'439" 
1,568 


1890 
1915 
1904 


1883 


28 Carlisle 






29 Carmel 


Nellie E. Wells 






Mattie Clark 




30 Carthage 


902 
9 1 7 
820 
916 
10,963 
522 
793 
3,500 


913 
1,031 

. 1,767 
1,114 
7,616 
1,211 
893 
2,842 


1890 
1921 
1893 
1914 
1908 
1912 
1915 
1901 


1852 


31 *Centerville 










1899 








34 Clinton 












36 Colfax ■ 






























8,990 
9,901 
1,168 
1,785 
1,945 
10,139 
3,232 


"'946' 
1,178 
2,356 
840 
2,393 
1,817 


1899 
1907 
1916 
1909 
1912 
1899 
1906 


1883 




Isabel Ball. 


























1883 










Mrs. C. F. White 






1,080 
1,729 

824 
4,762 
2,087 

630 
1,679 


1,559 
1,346 
861 
1,464 
1,299 


1915 
1903 
1914 
1904 
1900 
1886 
1921 




46 Danville 


















49 Delphi 






50 Dublin .... 




1883 


51 *Dugger 


Chas. Heaton 





'Report is for less than a year. |Not yet open. 



OUnless specified, law is 1901-03- 



Public Library Commission 



431 



STATISTICS 

ity taxation. These statistics are in most cases for the fisca Jyear, July 1, 1921 to June 30, 1922: a few are for 
comparative purposes. Tax rate is given in cents on the hundred dollars. 



o 


a 

3 

p 

Orr\ 


-a 
"3. 

O) o 

■go 
p 


B 

o 


a 

o 
"° - 


■a ts 

a> o 
-5 Eh 


Township 


a 

£.£■ 

o d 

.& e= 

S o 

gE" 


la 

o> o 


TO 

ae 
|o 




$12,500 




1915 
1918 


$4,250 
1,866 


$4, 138 
345 


.06 
.03 




Incl.intown 

$73 


.06 
.02 


$111 
220 


1 


10,000 






?, 






















Jeff rson 

YorK 


629 
597 

1,155 
100 
295 

2,652 
868 
724 
160 
810 
851 
300 
659 
200 
300 


.02 
.02 
.01 

Appr. 
.02 
.04 
.05 
.02 
.05 
.025 
.02 

Appr. 
.05 
.01 
.01 


















'456' 
713 

220 
22 
■ 18 
750 
11 
292 
228 




14,000 




1902 
1905 
1915 
1917 
1904 
1911 
1914 


3,470 
13,571 
2,219 
3,240 
2,682 
4,724 
2,488 
1,103 
4,923 


1,840 
12,754 
1,703 
586 
1,803 
3,248 
2,317 


.09 
.03 
.05 
.10 
.09 
.0425 
.07 


Monroe. ..' 

Anderson 

Pleasant 

Jackson 


3 


i 52,000 




4 


10,000 




5 


110,000 
|11,500 
•35,000 

pio.ooo 




fi 




7 


Eckhart . . 
Sutton.. . . 


Jackson 


8 
q 


Washington 

Shawswick 


in 


20,000 




1902 


3,543 


.05 


11 








12,000 




1911 
1918 


2,569 
6,494 


1,831 
5,665 


.10 

.05 


Richland 

Bloomington. . . . 


76 
330 


13 


24,600 




13 








117,000 
12,000 




1905 
1915 


3,736 
5,023 
317 
1,504 
4,174 
85 
2,674 


3,028 

2,549 

162 

616 

3,257 


.05 
.07 
.02 
.10 
.05 
.05 
.06 




437 
901 
20 
73 
147 
85 


14 






1,571 
133 
813 

769 


.03 

.02 

.05 

.05 

.05 

.02 

.02 

.025 

.03 

.035 

.01 


15 


Rent. . . . 




Wood 


Hi 


8,350 




1912 
1904 




17 


f 20, 000 






IX 


City .... 




19 


7,200 




1915 


830 


Iroquois 

Jackson 


1,045 

799 

Incl.intown 

854 

1,248 

334 


?in 










110,000 
110,000 




1917 
1912 
1918 


1,956 
2,550 


1,550 

1,636 

488 


.08 
.035 


105 
58 
30 


?,\ 




Brookville 

Lincoln 


?,?, 


|12,000 




2;^ 








291 
1,676 


278 
1,000 


05 
.05 




12 
120 


?A 


10,000 




1915 


Franklin 

Stafford 

Troy 


70 

35 

50 

400 

1,349 

1,339 


.01 
Appr. 
Appr. 
.01 
.03 
.03 


25 




































Wilmington 

Jackson 

Washington 












4,149 


1, 179 


.07 


219 


m 










City Hall 
10,000 






271 

1,889 
2,460 


257 
299 
434 


.02 
.03 
.05 


14 
57 

82 


V 




1917 
1914 


Haddon 

Clay 


1,543 

1,013 

929 

1,200 


.03 
.02 
.02 
.02 


28 


11,000 




29 






Delaware 

Ripley 




6,500 
Rent. . . . 


Subscr 


1902 


1,784 


200 


.02 


382 


30 
31 








677 
810 
7,716 
2,334 
1,331 
6,013 


180 

385 

5,328 

659 

235 

2,422 


.03 

.04 

.065 

.08 

.03 

.05 


Charlestown 

Smith 


575 

385 
2,030 
1,626 
1,060 
1,497 

538 
1,378 


.03 
.03 
.03 
.03 
.02 
.03 
.02 
.03 


22 
39 

356 
47 
35 

181 


33 








33 


13,000 
8,000 
9,700 




1911 
1916 
1917 
1919 


34 




Clay 


35 






36 


25,000 


Peabody. . 


Columbia 

Thorn Creek.. . . 


37 


















19, 200 
19,700 




1902 
1909 
1918 
1914 
1914 
1902 
1908 


4,818 
3,777 
1,474 
2,171 
1,945 
4,021 
3,913 


4,514 
2,867 

415 
1,189 

978- 
2,805 
2,124 


.033 
04 
.04 
.07 
.04 
.064 
.05 




313 

235' 

63 
505 

50 
231 
262 


3K 




Connersville .... 

Jackson 

Harrison 

Troy 


673 

992 

475 

916 

954 

1,352 

173 

1,316 

1,978 

2,217 

1,043 

1,081 


.01 
.03 
.03 
.02 
.015 
.03 
.01 
.03 
.04 
.05 
.01 
.0175 


39 


9,000 




40 


8,700 




41 


10,200 
26,000 
12,000 




49, 






43 






44 






Winfield 




10,000 
10,000 
10,000 




1916 
1903 
1915 
1906 
1906 


2,093 
3,619 
2,664 
5,875 
2,971 
370 


675 
1,641 

426 
4,133 
1,719 

263 


.06 
.08 
.05 
.05 
.08 
.08 


101 


45 






4fi 




Franklin 

Washington 

Deer Creek 


27 
698 
169 
106 


47 


12,700 




48 


10,000 




49 






50 


Rent. . . . 












51 



C.lUnless other wise specified, Carnegie building. 



432 



Year Book 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



City or Town 


Name of Librarian 


o 

§ 
'-§ a 

3 o 
%^ 

P-, 


d 
.2 

*3 
a 

Pi 


.a 

a 
a 

Q 


•Law 


52 Dunkirk 




2,532 

542 

35,967 

2,376 

24,772 

10,790 

85,264 

85,264 

2,155 

1,441 

1,339 

1,213 

94,904 

1,442 


"'4i6' 

7i2' 

797 

7,272 
7,029' 

"'983' 
1,180 
1,235 

27,754 
5,492 


1917 
1906 
1910 
1921 
1903 
1898 
1911 
1876 
1921 
1915 
1916 
1916 
1894 
1906 




53 Earl Park 


















56 Elkhart 


Ella F. Corwin 

Mrs. Ralph Donaldson 

Ethel F. M sCullough 




57 Ellwood 




58 Evansville (Public) 








Spec. 






60 Flora.... 






61 Fort Branch 






62 Fortville 






63 Fort Wayne... 




1883 


64 Fowler 


Mrs. Kate B. Hay 






























































648 
11,585 
4.909 


610 
1,609 
3,386 


1915 
1880 
1911 








1883 
























68 Fremont 


729 

1,980 
4,796 
55,378 


543 
3,164 
1,367 
7,182 


1920 
1919 
1911 
1908 










70 Garrett 






71 Gary 


W. J. Hamilton . . 






























72 Gas City 


2,879 

1,120 

9,525 

689 

3,780 

4,168 

5,345 

1,163 

1,907 

1,238 

36,000 

6,183 

832 


1,081 


1913 

..1907 




73 Goodland 










1,103 
416 

1,693 
1,672 

"i,'409' 
1,647 
1,002 

" i ,' 389 ' 

1,334 


1902 
1914 
1891 
1898 
1902 
1919 
1916 
1913 
1903 
1903 
1917 






Mrs. Grace C. Barker 

Belle S. Hanna 






1883 


77 Greenfield 






Mrs. Ida L. Ewing 














81 Hagerstown 

82 Hammond 

83 Hartford City 






Mrs. Jeanie L. Sawyer 




84 Hebron 


Mrs. W. E. Thaney 








85 *Huntingburg 

86 Huntington 


2,464 

14,000 

314,194 

314,194 

4,461 

10,098 

5,369 

1,283 

695 

578 

695. 

1,918 

1,577 

30,067 

1,045 


'33^867' 


1922 

1872 
1843 
1873 






1883 








Charles E. Rush 


1871 












5,629 

"'658' 
1,742 
1,164 

. 909 

8io' 

"i,"998* 


1900 
1911 
1910 
1905 
1913 
1913 
1906 
1919 
1885 
1919 


1852 


90 Kendalville 

91 Kentland 


Mrs. G. B. Bunyan 

Virginia Rinard 










Mrs. Edith D. Lindley 




94 Kirklin 






95 Knightstown 

96 Knox 














1883 
















22,480 
1,610 


'"'855' 


1882 
1912 


1883 


100 LaGrange 


Mrs. G. E. Herbert 








101 Laporte 


15,158 
3,464 


" 1*320" 


1897 
1910 


1883 













*Report is for less than a year. fNot yet open. (')TJnless specified, law is 1901-03-19. 



Public Library Commission 



433 



STATISTICS 



f! 1 p 

d ' 


2 Source of 
Building Fund 


1 

13. 

a 

-so 

Q 


1 

o H 


a 

o 

"O _ 

"a> o 
PEh 


a> o 


Township 


a 

T3 eg 
>t 

3 o 


4 

a** 


CO 

ll 
F 










$1,071 
3,535 

25,580 
382 

19,213 
6,027 

78,461 


$1,014 

853 

25,580 


.05 

.05 

.032 

.06 

.045 

.065 

.06 








55 
15 


r >'> 


$3,500 




1914 


Richland 


$2,666 


.05 


53 


42,000 




f»4 


Rent. . . . 










382 

920 

210 

2,003 


55 


35,000 




1903 

1904 

1912-14 

1885 


16,527 
4,815 
73,419 


Concord 

Pike Creek 

Vanderburgh Co. 


1,764 
1,000 
3,036 


.03 

.015 

.01 


56 


30,000 




57 


60,000 




58 


65,000 


Carpenter. 






198 
1,740 
2,061 
2,666 
90,436 
5,920 


198 
1,000 

310 

1,031 

72,000 

835 


.01 
.06 
.03 
.07 
.05 
.04 










59 


9,000 




1918 
1917 
1918 
1904 
1906 


Monroe 

Union 

Vernon 

Allen Co 


1,034 

1,759 

1,676 

16,587 

1,707 

449 

567 

571 

521 

745 

516 

2,015 

413 

1,630 

1,012 

745 


.03 
.03 
.03 
.02 
.03 
.03 
.01 
.01 
.03 
.01 
.01 
.05 
.01 
.03 
.02 
.02 


116 


fid 


10,500 




61 


10,000 




107 

1,848 
97 


a?, 


110,700 




63 


8,000 




R4 






Gilboa 

Hickory Grove. . 
Parish Grove — 
Pine 
















































































York 






9,000 




1916 
1907 
191b 


2,796 
9,914 
7,549 


712 

8,975 
3,884 


.10 
.07 
.06 




66 
325 

275 


M 


24,000 




Center 

Franklin 

Needham 

Union 


fifi 


17,500 




67 




























Report 


not receiv 
1,986 
4,007 
73,726 


ed... 






68 






1,910 
3,108 
73,726 


.05 

.095 
.05 


French Lick .... 

Keyser 

Calumet 


Incl.intown 
653 
Incl.intown 
Incl.intown 
Incl.intown 
Incl.intown 
1,722 


.05 

.05 

.025 

Appr. 

.05 


74 
746 


R9 


10,000 




l9i5 
18*2-19 


70 


111,700 




71 






















St. John 

West Chester. . . 
Mill 




















12,500 




1914 


5,366 
1,121 
7,532 

992 
4,602 
4,187 
4,071 

790 
1,677 
1,354 
26,214 
3,276 
2,762 


1,900 
1,018 
5,451 

978 
3,983 
2,061 
3,910 

487 
1,549 

485 

25,101 

2,551 

1,666 


.10 

.055 

.045 

.06 

.04 

.03 

.06 

.04 

.05 

.03 

.045 

.08 

.07 


1,743 
101 
572 
13 
618 
250 
180 
31 
126 
182 

1,110 


7? 






73 


25,000 




1902 
1919 
1903 
1909 
1905 


Elkhart 

Hammond 

Greencastle 


1,496 
Incl.intown 
Incl.intown 

1,874 


.03 
.05 
.02 

.02 


74 


8,000 




75 


20,200 




76 


10,600 




77 


16 100 






78 








295 

Incl.intown 
684 


.05 
.02 
.02 


79 


Commun 


ity Bldg. . . 


1919 


Pleasant 

Jefferson 


80 
81 


27,000 
15,000 
15,000 




1905 
1904 
1922 


8-> 






725 

714 
340 


.01 
.03 
.01 


83 






39 


84 






Eagle Creek 




Rent . 














85 


28,000 
Court H. 




1903 


8,712 

205 

283,143 


8,498 


.05 








213 

130 

47,739 


Rfi 




Marion County.. 


75 


Appr. 




500,000 


No report 


mi 

receive 
1906 
1914 
1911 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1912 


235,403 


.04 


87 








88 


16,000 


4,605 
4,383 
2,854 
1,361 
671 
1,456 
2,051 
1,069 
11,237 
5,247 


2,428 

3,633 
906 
438 
190 
810 

1,182 

520 

11,212 

1,010 


03 
.10 
.05 
.045 
.03 
.05 
.01 
.03 
.03 
.08 


Jeffersonville. . . . 


1,770 


03 


402 

750 

418 

26 

6 

11 

174 

66 

25 

92 


89 


14,950 




90 


11,000 




Jefferson 


1,528 
897 
475 
635 


.015 
.04 
.01 
.03 


91 


8 800 




92 


8,000 




Mill Creek 

Kirklin 


93 


7,500 




94 


10,000 






95 


Rent.... 




Center 


481 


.02 


96 


31,000 




1905 




97 




Clark 


2,088 
2,055 


.05 
.05 


98 








Scott 




9,000 
12,500 


Reynolds . 


1891 
1919 












99 


2,596 


1,184 


.05 


Bloomfield 

Clay 


554 

571 


.025 
.02 


284 


100 








37,500 




1920 
1915 


9,892 
3,552 


8,075 
2,029 


.045 
.04 




1,817 
109 


101 


11,800 




Lawrenceburg.. . 
Miller 


l,t)28 

385 


.04 
.04 


102 









( 2 ) Unless otherwise specified, Carnegie building. 



28—22978 



434 



Year Book 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



City or Town 


Name of Librarian 


o 

a 

o 

'43 a 
-2 & 

3 o 


1 

CO 

Ph g 

Ph 


1 

"SO 
Q 


J Law 


103 Lebanon ; 




6,257 
1,292 
2,037 
557 
5,845 
21,626 
1,197 


2,278 

4,922 

867 

687 

i3, i36* 

2,665 


1902 
1913 
1907 
1915 
1908 
1893 
1918 




104 Liberty . . . 












106 *Linden 
















1883 


109 Lowell. . 












110 Lynn 


898 
6,711 

23,747 

4,895 

678 


1,465 
20,709 

"i,'784' 
1,082 


1920 

1889 
1884 
1906 
1916 




































503 

19,457 
811 


1,624 

500 

1,926 


1916 
1895 
1907 




116 Michigan City( 3 ) 




1881 


117 Milford 












118 Milroy 


669 

15,195 

3,025 

1,357 

304 
2,536 
2,297 
1,781 


740 

"2,' 552' 
1,164 
817 
1,068 
1,575 
1,226 


1916 
1907 
1914 
1913 
1917 
1903 
1907 
1912 

' i9ii' 

1892 
1875 
1919 


1889B 
188l| 






120 Mitchell . . . 
















123 Monticello 








Belle I. Shall 
















126 Moscow (Milroy R. F. D.) . . 


145 

5,284 

36,524 

2,678 


870 
2-339 
2,1545 
1,514 


1889 


128 Muncie 




























130 Nashville 


323 

22,992 


6,696 


1919 
1884 




131 New Albany (Public). . . 




1883 








132 Newburg 




1,295 

609 

14,468 

1,120 

4,758 


2,038 
1,227 

' *i,*749' 


1909 
1902 
1913 
1838 




133 New Carlisle 


















136 Noblesville . . 


































137 *North Judson 


1,189 

2,711 

3,084 

2,270 

985 

322 

1,408 

1,093 

702 


916 

2,265 
10,216 

1,026 

1,095 
454 
977 
720 

1,231 


1916 
1908 
1917 
1917 
1915 
1902 
1913 
1911 
1919 




138 North Manchester 






139 North Vernon 




1917fl 


140 Oakland City 




141 Odon 






142 Orland 




1899 


143 Orleans 












145 Otterbein . . 


Theresa H. Farrell 












1,239 
950 

1,520 

1,244 

646 

12,410 

1,018 


2,606 
572 

1,346 

1,333 
820 
854 

1,034 


1915 
1912 
1917 
1909 
1895 
1896 
1915 




147 Oxford 






148 Paoli 






149 Pendleton 






150 Pennville 




1899 


151 Peru 


Mrs. May Hurst Fowler 


1883 














153 Plainfield 


1,373 


3,398 


1901 










154 Plymouth 


4,338 


4,561 


1910 






Emily Peterson 














155 Porter \. 


699 




1914 





(OUnless specified, law is 1901-03-19. 



Public Library Commission 



435 



STATISTICS 



o 


J 

i 1 


1 

1 

0) o 


a> 

-J 


1 

eg 

'53 o 


pa 


Township 


a 

IS 
|| 


A 


^8 

li 

go 




15,000 




1905 
1915 
1908 
1915 
1909 
1904 
1920 


$6,250 

3,838 
3,882 
1,568 
2,081 
36,899 
2,824 


$3,441 

401 

2,300 

115 

1,832 

19,230 

567 


.04 

.025 

.06 

.075 

.08 

.045 

.05 




$2,268 
3,349 
1,381 
1,381 


.02 
.025 
.025 
.03 


$539 
87 
201 
41 
247 
946 
117 


103 


$10,000 




Union County. . 

Perry 

Madison 


104 


10,000 




105 


10,000 




10ft 


15,000 




107 


35,000 




Cass County.. . 
Cedar Creek. . . . 
West Creek .... 

Washington 

Jefferson County 


16,723 

978 

1,160 

127 

3,807 


.025 
-02 
.015 
.0025 
.03 


HIS 


14,500 




Iflq 






Rent .. 






275 

7,307 

22,715 

3,684 

1,671 


127 

3,342 

21,929 

1,627 

187 


.0475 
.05 
.08 
.08 
.02 


20 

157 

785 

1,215 

28 


11(1 








111 


62,500 
14,900 




1902 
1908 


11" 




Washington 

Franklin 

Harrison 

Gill 


840 
659 
795 
IncLintown 
Incl.intown 
667 
774 
793 


.03 
.02 

.02 


Hfl 


Rent 




114 










10,000 
33,000 
10,000 




1918 
1897 
1919 


946 

5,384 
1,881 


923 

4,112 

409 




22 

1,272 

15 


11.' 


Subsc .... 


Michigan 

Jefferson 

Van Buren 

Anderson 


116 

117 












793 

7,781 
3,283 
2,154 
876 
3,427 
2,582 
3,754 


Incl.inTwp 
7,550 
1,207 
549 
63 
2,361 
1,181 
1,424 


!027 

.10 

.05 

.03 

.06 

.07 

.10 


.01 




IIS 


30,000 
12,300 




1916 
1917 
1914 
1918 
1907 
1908 
1916 


231 

758 
47 
19 


119 




Marion 

Monon 

Tippecanoe 


1,316 
1,357 

793 
1,065 
1,248 
1,629 

580 


.035 
.03 
.03 
.02 
.02 
.08 
.03 


19(1 


10,000 




l?,1 


5,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 




m 




123 




Harrison 


152 

119 


124 




Iftfi 




Madison ... 


















Iflfi 


12,000 
55,000 




1905 
1904 


2,513 

23,984 

3,475 


1,496 

22,069 

2,075 


.06 
.05 
.05 


Black 


412 

2,300 
529 
409 
499 
177 


.01 
.05 
.02 
.02 
.01 
.05 


601 
603 

186 


137 




m 






19Q 








Scott 
















Union 

Brown County. . 












1,025 
6,080 


10 
5,850 


.05 

.028 


833 
230 


130 


40,000 




1904 


131 












10,000 
9,000 
20,000 
23,000 
15,000 




1921 
1916 
1894 
1913 


1,010 
2,440 
7,000 
11,167 


99 
2,179 

Endow't 
3,882 


.015 
.03 


Ohio 


1,798 
879 


.05 
.105 


80 
31 

259 


m 




Olive 


133 






134 


Murphy . . 








ITi 


.06 


Fall Creek 

Noblesville 


1,267 

2,211 

1,409 

2,095 

1,469 

1,764 

7,064 

1,021 

511 

73 

665 

629 

2,947 


.04 
.04 
.04 
.04 
.03 
.02 
.04 
.05 
.03 
.05 
.03 
.04 
.07 
.03 
.015 
.05 
.04 
.02 
.10 
.02 
Appr. 
.02 
.035 
.025 
.02 
.02 
.02 


273 


13fi 


































White River 






14,000 

10,600 

20,000 

City Hall 




1922 
1912 
1920 


7,837 
3,005 
9,470 
2,479 

103 
1,370 
1,231 
3,669 


4,660 
1,670 


.07 
.04 


1,707 
70 

2,406 
24 
20 
30 
24 
69 
116 


137 




Chester 

Jennings Co ... . 

Columbia 

Madison 

Milgrove 


138 




139 




1,433 


.10 


140 








141 


5,000 


Joyce 


1903 
1915 
1914 


I4f 


10,000 
8,800 


678 
532 
603 


.07 
.06 
.06 


143 






144 






145 












12,500 




1917 
1917 
1918 
1912 


1,951 
3,733 
1,531 
2,403 
344 
6,786 
1,650 


544 
664 
803 
822 


.045 
.05 
07 
.05 


Montgomery 

Oak Grove 

Paoli 


1,357 

3,006 
684 


48 
61 
41 

333 
3 

428 
20 


14fi 


8,000 




147 


8,000 
8 500 




148 




Fall Creek 


149 








339 

900 

100 

1,206 

1,538 

1,431 

1,473 

856 

782 


150 


24 000 




1903 
1918 


5,453 
323 


.04 
.02 


Peru 


151 


10,000 




Monroe 

Washington 

Guilford 


152 








9,600 




1913 


3,882 


895 


.06 


10 


153 








17,000 




1913 


5,791 


2,482 


.045 




194 


154 




North 
















West 






City Hall 






274 


274 


.02 






155 



( 2 )Unless otherwise specified, Carnegie building. (')Report for more than a year. 



436 



Year Book 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



City or Town 


Name of Librarian 


o 

3 O 


a 
o 

"3 

a 

o-o 
Oh g 


T3 

(V 

'a 
a 

Q 


'Law 


156 Portland 




5,958 

881 

7,132 

1,044 

2,912 

26,765 

1,042 

1,411 

876 

414 

760 

3,720 


1,432 
1,190 
2,708 
908 
1,071 
4,681 

3,'6i3 

979 
1,189 

"8,' 283' 


1898 
1898 
1883 
1913 
1903 
1864 
1912 
1915 
1912 
1914 
1920 
1904 




157 Poseyville 


Caroline Elliott 






Anna F. Embree 






Molly Shearer 
















162 Ridgeville 












164 Roachdale. . . . 


























Sara Hill '. 




168 Rock port 


2,581 
1,968 
900 
5,498 
2,836 
1,609 
7,348 
9,701 
1,761 
1,034 


2,248 

1,533 

833 

2,i25 

5,815 
1,164 
1,362 
1,982 
2,079 


1915 
1913 
1914 
1910 
1903 
1917 
1904 
1897 
1910 
1912 




169 Rockville . . 






170 Royal Center 


Olive Rhody 




171 Rushville 






172 Salem 






173 Scottsburg 




1917 








175 Shelby ville . 




1883 








177 Shoals 








Virginia M. Tutt 




178 South Bend 


70,983 
1,074 
2,066 


"2,726' 
2,276 


1888 
1913 
1906 


1883 


179 South Whitley.... 


























181 Stilesville 


357 
4,489 

650 
1,171 
4,086 
66,083 
1,432 
4,507 
3,406 
6,518 

861 

1,175 

17,210 

9,872 

1,031 

713 
1,520 
5,478 
8,743 
1,172 

590 

574 
3,830 

637 

408 
10,145 
1,088 
1,684 
4,021 
1,853 

957 


634 

2,693 

991 

805 

"'938' 
4,416 

"'904' 
1,260 
8,136 

"2,038' 
1,027 
1,537 
3,591 
479 
1,440 
2,300 

"'360' 

945 

'"393 
896 

"'753' 
969 


1921 
1902 
1919 
1908 
1904 
1882 
1912 
1901 
1902 
1905 
1917 
1915 
1889 
1902 
1913 
1914 
1916 
1885 
1901 
1912 
1914 
1901 
1921 
1914 
1913 
1904 
1915 
1905 
1912 
1912 


1899 


182 Sullivan 


















185 Tell City . 






186 Terre Haute . 


Mrs. SallieC. Hughes 


1883 


187 Thorntown. 


Ruth M. Cox 




188 Tipton . . 






189 Union City 












191 Van Buren 






192 Vevay 




1917 






1883 


194 Wabash . 






195 Walkerton 






196 Walton 






197 Warren . . 






198 Warsaw 






199 Washington 






200 Waterloo 






201 Waveland 






202 Westfield 


Eva Wells 




203 fWest Lafayette . . 








Ruth E. Biser 




205 Westville 


E. T. Scott 




206 Whiting 


Adah Shelly 




207 Williamsport 






208 Winamac 






209 Winchester 






210 Worthington 






211 Zionsville 




1899 









•"Report is for less than a year. fNot yet open. (')Unless specified, law is 1901-03-19. 



Public Library Commission 



437 



STATISTICS 



M 

el 

+a 3 

o 


1 


CD 

t 

Q 


1 

ja 


a 

o 
T3 - 

.fc P 

8£ 

P4 




Township 


a 

S o 
P4 


.2* 
13 

<a o 


gl 




$15,000 
5,500 




1902 
1905 
1905 
1916 
1905 
1864 


$4, 728 

827 

4,438 

1,922 

4,960 

8,872 

684 

2,923 

1,837 

1,107 

173 

10,411 


$3,841 

141 

1,844 

1,692 

1,931 


.055 

.06 

.025 

.04 

.045 




$660 

683 

1,818 

Incl.intown 

2,971 

7,842 


.01 

.02 

.025 

.02 

.05 

.08 


$225 

3 

773 

228 

55 

1,029 

97 

92 

126 

45 

6 

311 


15fi 




Robb 


157 


15,000 






158 


10,000 




Carpenter 


159 


12,000 




160 


50,000 


Morrison.. 




161 


Rent 


585 

1,274 

1,709 

222 

167 

1,716 


.05 
.10 
.06 
.06 
.06 
.04 




16? 


10,000 




1918 
1914 
1918 


Ohio County . . . 

Franklin 

Pawpaw 


1,523 
Incl.intown 
838 


.05 
.03 
.02 


1fi3 


10,000 




164 


10,000 




165 


Rent . . . 




166 


18,000 




1907 


Rochester 

Fulton Co. 

5 Twps 

Ohio 


3,273 

5,108 

1,103 

718 

1,153 


.035 

.03 
.05 
.03 
.03 


167 












1919 
1916 
1915 


2,190 
1,626 
1,714 
2,949 
2,543 
3,190 
5,849 
8,213 
2,690 
2,006 


961 

838 

554 

2,421 

1,609 


.02 
.07 
.05 
.03 
.10 




17,000 


124 

69 

5 

727 

59 

358 

845 

245 

99 

5 


168 


12 500 






169 


10,000 
Court H. 






170 






171 


17,500 




1905 
1920 
1905 
1903 
1913 
1915 


Washington 

Scott County . . . 

Jackson 

Addison 


872 
2,331 
735 
558 
1,699 
608 
717 


.05 
.05 
.02 
.01 
.03 
.07 
.05 


m 


20,300 




17:? 


10,000 




4,765 

7,408 

891 

674 


.08 
.05 
.06 
.10 


174 


30,000 
12,500 
10,000 




175 




176 






177 




Halbert 




31,000 


Taxation.. 


1896 


65,820 
2,606 
3,618 


63,996 

948 

1,964 


.05 
.06 
.10 


1,773 

66 
111 


17S 


Cleveland 

Clay 


1,592 
310 

266 
964 


.03 
.05 
.05 
.05 


179 


10,500 




1912 


180 




Montgomery 

Washington 


























467 
3,737 
2,275 
1,889 
2,141 
38,532 
2,631 
3,030 
1,627 
6,373 
1,956 
5,411 
7,204 
4,798 
511 
2,270 
1,813 
9,850 
3,662 
1,603 
3,060 
2,235 


450 

2,541 

434 

923 

2,009 

29,212 

1,012 

1,860 

1,627 

5,370 

244 

656 

7,051 

4,519 

484 

249 

693 

7,020 

2,883 

746 

409 

230 


"65' 
.05 
.06 
.07 
.05 
.09 
.05 
.08 
.07 

!07' 
.02 
.03 


17 
53 
41 
51 
130 
9,320 
269 
579 


1X1 


10,000 




1905 


Hamilton 


1,139 

1,798 
913 


.02 
.05 
.03 


is:> 






183 


10,000 




1921 
1917 
1906 
1915 
1902 
1904 
1916 
1919 
1918 
1919 
1903 


Turkey Creek.. . 


184 


10,000 




185 


80,000 
10,000 


Fairbanks. 








186 


Sugar Creek .... 


1,345 
589 


.04 
.005 


187 


13,000 
11 000 




1S.S 






189 


22,000 






748 
1,624 
4,783 


.02 

'.in' 


252 
85 
70 
152 
277 
26 
43 
58 
397 
164 
37 
42 
47 


190 


10,000 




Van Buren 

Switzerland Co.. 


191 


12,500 




19? 


35 000 




19. ,: : 


20,000 
Rent 










194 










195 


10,000 
10,600 




1915 
1920 
1917 
1903 
1914 
1915 
1911 


.03 
06 
.10 
.05 
.06 
.08 
.06 


Tipton 


1,975 
1,060 
2,432 
613 
810 
2,607 
1,956 


.03 
.03 
.04 
.02 
.03 
.05 
.03 


196 




Salamonie 


197 


17,000 
23,000 




198 


Washington 


199 


9,000 




200 


10,000 




Brown 


201 


9,000 




Washington 


202 






9Q-A 


7,500 
8,000 




1916 
1915 
1906 
1917 
1916 
1916 
1918 


1,229 
1,508 
9,178 
1,659 
2,174 
7,303 
1,754 
531 


1,207 
107 

8,745 
688 
1,226 
2,198 
1,563 


.05 
.03 
.04 
.06 
MO 
.05 
.06 


Pike 


Incl.intown 
1,311 


.04 
.03 


21 

88 

430 


m 




New Durham. . . 


205 


20,000 
8,000 
10,000 
12,000 
10,000 




?M 




Washington — . 
Monroe 


970 
948 


.03 
.05 


207 






?m 




5,071 

190 

2 


?m 




Jefferson 

Eagle 


Incl.intown 
529 


.02 
.01 


210 






211 















( 2 ) Unless otherwise specified, Carnegie building. 



438 



Year Book 



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446 



Year Book 



TAX-SUPPORTED 



City or Town 






cS O 

P3 



a « 

& i 



1*3 



o a> 
'Cffi 
J 3 
Ph 



1 Akron 

2 Albion 

3 Alexandria . 

4 Anderson . . 

5 Angola .... 



6 Atlanta 

7 Attica 

8 Auburn 

9 Aurora 

10 Avon (Danville R. F. D.) . 



11 Bedford 

12 Bloomfield... 

13 Bloomington . 

14 Bluffton 

15 Boonville 



16 Borden. 

17 Bos well. 

18 Brazil... 

19 *Bristol.. 

20 Brook.. 



21 Brookston . . . 

22 Brookville. .. 

23 Brownsburg . 

24 Brownstown . 

25 Butler 



26 Cambridge City. 

27 Cannelton 

28 Carlisle 

29 Carmel 

30 Carthage 



31 Centerville.. 

32 Charlestown . 

33 Churubusco . 

34 Clinton 

35 Coatesville . . 



36 Colfax 

37 Columbia City. 

38 Columbus 

39 Connersville. . . 

40 Converse 



41 Corydon 

42 Covington 

43 Crawfordsville. 

44 Crown Point . . . 

45 Culver 



46 Danville... 

47 Darlington . 

48 Decatur . . . 

49 Delphi.... 

50 Dublin.... 



51 

52 Dunkirk. 

53 Earl Park... 

54 East Chicago. 

55 *Edinburg .... 



664 

1,710 

1,966 

11,102 

2,338 

1,529 
2,865 
2,503 
2,241 
600 

3,202 
1,632 

7,388 
2,943 

2,528 

406 
652 

2,595 
262 

1,828 

1,082 
2,088 
1,017 
1,351 
1,137 

2,774 

293 

1,391 

1,668 

893 

500 

468 

820 

9,668 

1,023 

620 
1,830 
2,122 
2,990 

831 

1,413 

738 
5,826 
2,066 
1,427 

2,250 

711 

3,673 

1,214 

462 



328 
927 
611 



254 



652 
100 



600 

615 

550 

1,361 



412 



225 
451 



844 



581 



118 
1,381 



338 

1,120 

411 



317 

2,851 
638 

245 
810 
31 
165 
217 

447 
136 
610 
361 
313 

396 



350 
262 



3,441 
5,806 
6,186 
19,546 
5,406 

5,202 
7,416 
5,848 
6,781 
1,676 

12,951 
4,411 
9,604 

12,308 
6,214 

1,514 
2,375 
11,533 
3,000 
3,500 

2,293 
4,608 
3,861 
1,864 
5,433 

9,061 
2,819 
3,179 
4,307 
6,135 

1,200 
2,676 
2,649 
12,506 
4,096 

1,735 

12,447 
16,600 
8,918 
3,256 

2,631 
4,422 
15,119 
7,306 
3,525 

8,763 
3,726 



7,003 
3,803 



442 
651 
522 
3,139 
610 

948 
419 
678 
369 
1,676 

355 

286 



863 

7 

100 

365 

3,000 

363 

203 
483 
643 
134 



851 
95 
169 
288 
298 

500 
121 
321 

1,178 
480 

133 

1,365 

1,104 

588 

237 



329 
801 
951 

277 

725 
411 
653 
262 
206 



30 
19 
49 
115 

25 

31 
40 
76 
35 



55 
35 

15 
74 
106 



1,490 
667 

5,436 
632 



-t. 



2,914 
3,101 

26,855 
917 



197 



923 



22 
27 
132 



"Report for less than a year. 



Public Library Commission 

PUBLIC LIBRARIES— Continued. 



447 



C5 <D 



IH.-B 

o s 



Vacations 



SIS 
q,Jb 



o 

n 

•II 

13 



9,190 

(1) 25,557 

27,022 

68,428 

18,926 

20,931 
12,493 



21,291 

7,182 



8,321 
42,772 
30,783 
45,033 

3,118 
6,090 
(2) 27,563 
6,975 
9,286 

11,086 
. 16,019 
15,308 
13 391 
12,913 

32,668 
5,577 
6,703 
9,602 
8,372 

(2) 2,084 



8,776 

79,463 

(2) 14,226 

7,144 

(1) 28,629 
49,745 
28,828 
11,202 

16,435' 
10,596 

(2) 31,685 
17,306 

5,527 

(2) 13,731 
8,971 
23,099 
16,599 
5,585 



1,145 
5,434 

8,837 
17,629 
10,043 

4,878 
3,178 



5,258 
563 



4,013 
15,921 
14,966 

5,885 



2,491 
1,342 



5,413 

899 
5,170 

2,821 



519 

26,274 

216 

5,230 

3,265 

9,703 



2,941 

44,367 

2,431 

2,907 
8,737 
22,653 
6,250 
3,307 

1,810 
1,595 
11,238 
8,192 
3,450 

7,404 
3,730 
1,524 
2,469 
1,862 



4,411 
9,034 
13,959 
18,894 
10,567 

10,437 
4,797 



3,125 

18,010 

5,120 

24,722 

22,661 

25,570 

647 
2,096 
13,516 
2,192 
5,379 

2,724 
7,256 
7,251 
6,150 
4,865 

18,481 
1,983 
6,061 
3,486 
4,043 

1,040 
2,471 
3,876 
89,549 
5,264 

3,091 
11,938 
26,196 
11,370 

3,445 

7,563 

4,642 
11,497 
10,874 

3,910 



4,690 
11,385 



None 
None 

1 

5 

1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
None 

1 

None 

2 

1 
1 

None 
None 

1 
None 
None 

1 
1 

None 

None 

1 

2 
None 

1 
None 

1 

None 
None 
None 

1 
None 

None 

2 

2 

2 
None 

None 
None 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 
1 

None 



Two weeks . 

None 

Two weeks . 



Two weeks . 



Holidays . . . 
Two weeks . 
Two weeks . 
Two weeks. 
None 



One month . 
Holidays. . 
One month . 
Two weeks. 
None 



None 

Holidays. . 
Two weeks . 

None 

Holidays. . 

Two weeks . 
One month . 
Two weeks . 

None 

Two weeks . 



Two weeks . 
Holidays . . . 
Two weeks . 
One week . . 
Holidays . . . 



None 

Holidays . . . 

None 

Ten days... 
Two weeks . 



Holidays . . . 
Two weeks. 
Two weeks . 

None 

Holidays . . 

Two weeks . 
Holidays. . . 
One month . 
One month . 
One week . . 



Two 
Two weeks . 
Two weeks . 
None ..'... 
None 



30 
38 

63H 

72 

30 

42 



30 

38 
48 
42 
30 

42 
48 
42 
42 
42 

48 
30 
42 
42 
39 

12 
30 
48 

m 

33 

42 
42 
42 
21 
42 

43^ 

10 

38 

41 

34 



,772 
,014 
,931 
,631 



3,668 

67,480 

1,049 



4,523 
4,596 
71,479 
3,699 



None 
None 



None 



None 
Two 
Two 
None 



19^ 
39 
76 
15 



19^ 
39 
48 
15 



(1) All branch circulation counted as fiction: school branches counted 

(2) All juvenile circulation counted as fiction. 



juveniles. 



448 



Year Book 



TAX SUPPORTED 



City or Town 



a o 



id a> 

si* 



I 5 



56 Elkhart 

57 Elwood 

58 Evansville (Public) . . 
Evansville (Willard) . 

59 fFairmount 

60 Flora 



61 Fort Branch. 

62 Fortville. . . . 

63 Fort Wayne. 

64 Fowler 

65 Frances vi lie. 



Frankfort . . . 
Franklin. . . . 

Fremont 

French Lick . 
Garrett 



71 Gary. 



City.. 

73 Goodland.. 

74 Goshen .... 

75 Grandview . 



76 Greencastle. 

77 Greenfield.. 

78 Greensburg . 

79 Greentown . 

80 Greenwood . 



81 Hagerstown... 

82 Hammond — 

83 Hartford City. 

84 Hebron 

85 *Huntingburg . . 



86 Huntington 

87 Indianapolis (County) 
Indianapolis (Public) . 

88 Masonville 

89 Jeff ersonville 

90 Kendallville 



91 Kentland.... 

92 Kewanna 

93 Kingman .... 

94 Kirkland.... 

95 Knightstown . 



96 Knox. . . . 

97 Kokomo . . 

98 Ladoga . . . 

99 Lafayette. 
100 Lagrange. 



101 Laporte 

102 Lawrenceburg . 

103 Lebanon 

104 Liberty 

105 Ligonier 



106 *Linden 

107 Linton 

Logansport . 

Lowell 

Lynn 



109 
110 



11,740 

5,832 

42,276 

16,486 



700 
2,071 
2,421 



36,115 
14,186 
73,099 
52,750 



2,424 

386 

5,533 

2,330 



204 
83 



1,221 

1,281 

1,417 

33,069 

2,352 

623 

6,874 
3,078 



222 

295 

674 

3,030 

1,071 

217 

346 
971 



3,185 

2,698 
3,235 
106,391 
6,592 
2,130 

18,142 
10,123 



847 

346 

474 

18,720 

1,186 

464 

1,787 
1,336 



14 
15 
410 
45 
36 

123 
61 



800 
2,197 

29,964 

1,043 

549 

5,215 

367 



246 



410 



862 
140 



3,326 

2,402 

652 

1,005 

986 
6,175 
2,498 

551 



379 



439 
214 



1,198 
4,984 

94,354 
3,810 
2,750 

15,190 
1,874 

12,680 

10,372 

9,200 

1,476 

3,098 

3,461 
30,267 
13,278 

1,604 



435 

529 

7,864 
437 
103 

1,016 

277 

228 
644 
505 
333 
1,774 

329 

3,517 

471 

238 



10 
39 

511 
34 
18 

113 
11 



11 

47 
■8 
24 

19 
170 
57 
32 



4,287 

97 

79,992 



36,994 

5,068 

285,950 



1,434 

8 
49,282 



100 



5,654 
3,119 

954 
753 
711 

747 
1,407 

1,044 

12,490 
1,211 



210 
85 

211 

370 

71 

4(ld 



1,241 

6,373 
1,591 
6,402 
2.957 
1,000 

211 
3,536 
9,931 
1,049 



50 

683 
445 



11,024 
7,145 

4,053 
3,179 
1,463 
2,900 
5,767 

1,711 

22,408 
3,988 



996 
560 

367 
133 
133 

176 



264 
3,843 

1,278 



767 
2,230 
1,965 

291 

70 



5,939 
404 
197 



25,445 
6,508 

16,476 
5,408 
6,625 

797 

4,654 

35,899 

1,824 

1,039 



507 



925 
417 



618 



797 
238 
9,112 
373 
446 



61 

27 

42 
21 
11 
15 

48 

10 
167 
27 



158,660 
49,322 

529,366 
80,110 



11,879 

13,025 
14,800 
485,364 
35,508 
12,386 

78,860 
56,350 



9,534 
27,637 

363,024 
23,156 

8,560 
93,072 

6,078 

20,030 
26,920 
40,216 
7,915 
13,014 

15,933 
118,059 
41,929 
12,340 



59,049 

1,184 

1,191,981 



55,371 
26,799 

14,715 
9,594 

5,738 
6,719 
15,792 

9,447 
118,901 
22,276 



17,733 

66,666 
28,373 
61,175 
32,751 
32,989 

1,175 

32,072 

156,364 

15,730 

8,346 



"Report for less than a year. fNot yet open. 



Public Library Commission 

PUBLIC LIBRARIES— Continued. 



449 



Fiction 
Loaned 


Non-Fiction 
Loaned 


'3 & 

■I 3 - 


1! 


Vacations 


Cl-M 

1* 
w 


i 
m 

3 




108,699 


49,961 

9,324 

242,427 


72,949 

16,728 

294,739 


6 

1 

25 

2 




72 

69^ 
76 
54 


45 
45 
42 
54 


56 


39,998 




57 


286,939 




58 














59 


(2) 9,953 


1,926 

4,818 
2,466 
251,156 
6,357 
2,408 

27,450 
15,861 


3,271 

6,945 
5,121 

269,290 
19,987 
3,405 

32,890 
24,835 


None 

None 

1 

29 

2 

None 

3 
2 




36 

28 

42^ 

75 

48 

27 

72 
76 


36 

28 

42^ 

45 

42 

27 

42 
54 


60 


8,207 




61 

62 


12,334 




234,206 




63 
64 
65 

66 
67 

68 


(1) 29,151 




9,978 




51,410 




40,489 












3,247 

11,065 
* 


None 

1 

26 
1 

None 
3 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

None 

None 
10 
1 
1 




12 
42 

66 
57 

soy 2 

66 
42 . 

54 
66 
72 
15 
54 

72 
39 
20 


12 
42 

45 

48 

30^ 

42 

42 

54 
48 
51 
15 
54 

im 

45 

39 
20 


69 
70 

71 

72 
73 


21,785 


5,852 








13,134 


10,022 
966 

31,362 
435 


8,737 

3,173 

45,676 

1,847 




7,594 




61,710 




74 


5,643 




75 






76 


20,397. 


6,523 

12,496 

. 234 

2,276 

1,432 
40,686 
6,036 
3,047 


10,682 
7,615 
3,989 
3,938 

5,366 
55,788 
17,234 
4,621 




77 


27,720 




78 
79 






10,738 




80 


14,501 




81 
82 


77,373 




35,893 




83 


9,293 




84 






85 


35,735 


23,314 


34,851 


2 
None 
107 




72 
6 
76 


48 

6 

42 


86 






87 


698,642 


493,339 


546,854 










88 


46,242 


9,129 
6,483 

4,261 
3,694 
1,405 


20,708 
10,533 

5,279 
3,718 
1,263 
1,183 
4,289 

4,475 
51,179 


1 
1 

1 
None 

1 
None 
None 

None 
4 




48 
48 

42 
30 
14 
22 
36 

15 

75 


48 
42 

42 
30 
14 
22 
36 

15 

42 


89 


20,316 




90 


10,454 




91 


5,900 




92 


4,333 




93 






94 


15,540 


252 

105 
53,138 




95 


9,342 




96 


65,763 




97 






98 






99 




14,820 
6,864 
9,031 
3,925 

8,287 

218 

7,010 

39,089 

6,659 

480 


4,371 

28,814 
11,259 
20,585 
9,708 
14,969 

599 
14,105 
68,192 
4,931 
3,393 


1 

3 

1 

2 

2 

None 

None 

1 

6 
None 




18 

72 
48 
60 
44 
33 

343^ 
48 

72 

42 

6 


18 

48 
48 
60 
42 
33 

343^ 
48 
42 
42 
6 


100 


51,846 




101 


21,509 




102 


52,124 




103 


(1) 28,836 




104 


24,702 




105 


957 




106 


25,062 




107 


117,275 




108 


9,071 




109 


7,866 




110 



(1) All branch circulation counted as fiction; school branches counted as juveniles. 

(2) All juvenile circulation counted as fiction. 



29—22978 



450 



Year Book 



TAX-SUPPORTED 



City or Town 



111 Madison 

112 Marion 

113 Martinsville. 

114 Men tone 

1 15 Merom 



116 Michigan City . 

117 Milford 

118 Milroy 

119 Mishawaka 

120 Mitchell 



121 Monon 

122 Monterey... 

123 Monticello.. 

124 Montpelier. 

125 Mooresville. 



126 Moscow (Milroy R. F. D.) . 

127 Mt. Vernon 

128 Muncie 

129 Nappanee — 

130 Nashville 



131 New Albany (Public) . 
New Albany (Twp.) . 

132 Newburgh 

133 New Carlisle 

134 Newcastle 

135 New Harmony 



136 Noblesville 

137 *NorthJudson 

138 North Manchester. 

139 North Vernon 

140 Oakland City 



141 Odon.... 

142 Orland... 

143 Orleans... 

144 Osgood... 

145 Otterbein. 



146 Owensville. 

147 Oxford.... 

148 Paoli 

149 Pendleton. 

150 Pennville.. 



151 Peru 

152 Pierceton. 

153 Plainfield. 

154 Plymouth. 

155 Porter.... 



156 Portland... 

157 Posey ville. . 

158 Princeton.. 

159 Remington. 
160 



161 Richmond. 

162 Ridgeville. 

163 Rising Sun. 
164iRoachdale. 
lCS^Roann 



is 



3,229 
9,437 
3,078 
1,095 



2,954 
811 



4,018 
2,059 

1,477 
668 
2,904 
1,662 
1,850 



1,671 

18,048 

1,295 

966 

8,381 



739 

726 

3,516 



3,764 
160 
2,422 
4,886 
1,792 

740 



1,233 
601 
745 

1,731 

946 

1,086 

1,229 



3,065 

649 

3,163 

3,010 

458 

2,291 
364 

3,873 
960 

2,825 

15,968 

615 

1,520 



km 



789 
207 
531 



mi 



525 
406 



385 
682 






7,391 
39,605 
9.344 
2,377 
2,027 

15,027 
3,665 
2,725 
9,397 
3,351 

5,268 
3,445 
6,898 
9,145 



a.s* 



2,548 

2,313 

485 

112 

176 

541 
293 
50 
606 
181 

271 

1,008 

1,230 

211 

634 



367 
'405 



142 
170 



30 

2,024 
37 

565 
3,152 

182 

470 



472 
186 
287 

750 
340 
295 
473 
360 



314 
1,945 
1,071 



v42 



857 
337 
356 

Inch town 



641 
368 
204 



9,269 

41,985 

2,534 

3,339 

23,610 

990 

3,321 

2,304 

6,133 

23,653 

11,577 
963 
4,738 
6,535 
2,408 



2,793 
2,148 
3,190 
1,849 

3,903 
3,426 
1,805 
5,936 
1,600 

22,243 
1,699 
7,520 
8,517 
1,956 

2,073 
2,282 

14,832 
4,565 

12,511 

51,289 
2,541 
3,634 
3,495 
1,950 



346 
5,145 

948 
1,088 

600 



131 
50 
13 
18 

48 
33 



402 
240 
574 
474 



592 
486 
413 
532 

642 
71 
180 
215 
462 

604 
620 
198 
445 
51 



224 

443 

1,173 

116 

677 
132 
281 

284 
746 

1,491 
202 
419 
184 



67 
172 



81 



24 

9 

50 

102 

70 
12 
39 
65 
17 

15 
15 
21 
11 
38 



111 
19 
48 
57 
10 

38 
28 
57 
24 
73 

117 



♦Report for less than a year. 



Public Library Commission 

PUBLIC LIBRARIES— Continued. 



451 



=85 






o g 



Vacations 





B 








W 


B 






.12 Pi 


H 


1-3 


57 


48 


75 


42 


72 


48 


30 


30 


18 


18 


72 


36 


353^ 


35H 


40 


40 



41,657 
106,336 
32,024 



(1) 53,622 
7,879 



52,260 
19,081 

12,743 
9,514 

10,184 
(1) 18,954 
(1) 14,114 



9,087 
18,870 
8,670 



12,799 
576 



21,259 

30,170 

15,748 

1,189 

3,107 

27,493 
3,292 



21,700 
5,865 

2,395 
78 
7,115 
2,576 
2,972 



31,933 
11,292 

6,470 
3,699 
2,941 
8,479 
6,978 



1 
1 

None 



None 
Stud'ts 



None 
None 



Two weeks . 
Two weeks. 
One month . 

None 

Holidays. . . 



One month . . 
Two weeks . . 

Summer 

Three weeks . 
Two weeks . . 



Holidays . . . 
Ten days... 
Two weeks. 
Two weeks . 
Two weeks . 



48 



45 



23,705 
138,211 

17,927 
7,638 

41.273 



8,641 

7,040 

27,945 

18,105 

40,416 

923 

11,729 

52,658 
17,845 

6,851 
3,597 
10,514 
6,545 
9,512 

16,095 
12,280 
9,164 
12,589 



43,071 

9,273 

33,457 

(1) 41,197 



22,843 
9,440 

27,012 
9,112 

16,241 

69,423 
9,013 
13,397 
10,671 
4,064 



7,524 

45,120 

7,930 

1,726 

26.155 



12,423 
95,117 
16,128 
3,386 

23,607 



1 

7 

1 

None 



One month . . 
Two weeks . . 
Three weeks. 
None 



Two weeks . 



3,546 

671 

9,191 

13,597 

14,788 
62 

7,634 
16,546 

1,896 

3,595 



5,268 

596 

1,319 

3,448 
3,661 
2,265 
2,407 



5,359 
3,524 
16,176 
6,982 

19,447 
416 

7,814 
25,937 

5,851 

4,572 
1,967 
7,427 
2,323 
4,381 

2,346 
5,856 
3,620 
4,928 



11,073 

670 

14,739 

9,105 



21,897 
3,588 
19,890 
24,299 



13,223 
347 

14,840 
3,819 
5,934 

31,644 

608 

4,774 

3,170 

1,842 



21,024 
1,255 

17,689 
3,950 
8,805 

27,429 
2,974 
8,686 
5,840 
2,008 



None 
None 

1 

1 



None 

1 

2 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 

1 
None 



None 

2 

4 
None 

1 

None 

2 
None 



5 

None 

1 
None 
None 



None 

Two weeks . 
Two weeks. 
Indefinite . . 

Two weeks . 

None 

Two weeks. 
Two weeks. 
None 

None 

None 

Holidays. . . 
Two weeks . 
One week . . 



None 

None 

Holidays. 

Three weeks 

School holidays. 



Two weeks. 

None 

Holidays. ., 
Two weeks. 
None 



Two weeks. 
None ...... 

Two weeks. 
Two weeks . 
Holidays . . . 

Two weeks. 
Holidays . . . 
Holidays. . . 
Holidays . . . 
None 



48 



72 

WA 

42 
70J^ 



38^ 
9 

76 
42 
60 

75 
18 



38^ 
9 

42 
42 



(1) All branch circulation counted as fiction; school branches counted as juveniles. 



452 



Year Book 



TAX-SUPPORTED 



City or Town 



£PQ 



H 



la 

CD <D 



Is 



I s 



166 Roanoke 

167 Rochester 

168 Rockport 

169 Rockville 

170 Royal Center. 



171 Rushville... 

172 Salem 

173 Scottsburg. 

174 Seymour . . , 

175 Shelbyville. 



176 Sheridan. 

177 Shoals... 

178 South Bei 



179 South Whitley. 

180 Spencer 



181 Stilesville. 

182 Sullivan.. 

183 Swayzee . . 

184 Syracuse. 

185 Tell City. 



186 Terre Haute. 

187 Thorntown-. . 

188 Tipton 

189 Union City.. 

190 Valparaiso... 

191 VanBuren.. 

192 Vevay 

193 Vincennes. . . 

194 Wabash 

195 Walkerton... 



196 Walton 

197 Warren 

198 Warsaw. . . . 

199 Washington. 



200 Waterloo 

201 Waveland 

202 Westfield 

203 West Lafayette . 



204 West Lebanon. 

205 Westville 

206 Whiting 

207 Williamsport.. 



208 Winamac... 

209 Winchester.. 

210 Worthington. 

211 Zionsville.... 



204 
3,986 
1,908 
1,590 

884 

2,046 
1,349 
2,136 
4,205 
4,265 

2,430 
1,096 
18,496 

1,191 
1,710 



2,351 

598 

1,002 

958 

18,100 

989 

2,546 

1,383 

5,240 



3,474 

4,836 

3,470 

576 

1,148 
1,195 
4,044 
3,560 

1,370 
1,002 
1,552 



2,100 
736 
494 
397 



348 
1,297 



765 



873 
529 



639 



176 
200 
378 



343 
275 



347 



2,633 



250 
4,559 
1,002 

1,826 

3,546 

1,236 

472 



383 
473 
511 

524 

176 

482 
,158 



1,316 

9,598 
3,560 
4,589 
2,503 

6,166 
8,526 
4,889 
9,470 
14,522 

5,305 

3,532 

59,380 

4,630 
5,429 



5,774 
1,813 
2,768 
4,130 

71,000 
6,218 

10,726 
6,257 
9,517 



7,600 
15,688 
8,728 
2,119 

3,756 
2,634 
9,030 
10,518 

2,637 
3,592 
3,723 



26 

1,582 

492 

310 

290 



157 
471 
955 
401 

484 

383 

6,624 

481 
505 



363 
402 
221 
737 

[,081 
236 
949 
172 



100 

1,281 

1,173 

441 

223 

105 

392 

1,060 

507 

190 
518 
374 



58 
23 

78 
65 

44 

39 

312 

35 

48 

12 
46 
8 
15 
15 

250 
38 
46 
26 

115 



50 

115 

50 

8 

25 
18 
84 
57 



334 

189 



507 
370' 



2,867 
3,652 
18,030 
2,439 

5,264 
7,341 
4,626 
2,202 



250 
343 
,255 



234 
215 

478 
182 



52,080 
18,155 
19,297 
10,755 

36,103 
28,020 
24,031 
59,765 
50,112 

22,437 

9,785 

361,148 

20,093 
19,902 

5,974 
29,344 
10,023 

8,052 
16,541 

400,227 
12,399 
46,258 
27,040 
38,390 



43,958 

49,224 

36,905 

4,804 

12,240 
17,102 
42,152 
58,649 

8,705 
16,356 
12,196 



8.905 

7,232 

57,655 

5,784 

13,956 

30,016 

21,404 

5,867 



Public Library Commission 

PUBLIC LIBRARIES— Continued. 



453 



"8 




0> <D 

a g 


11 


Vacations 


u 


to 

o 
H 

'Mi 

2 S3 

12 










None 

2 

1 
None 
None 

2 
1 
1 
1 
2 

2 
None 

16 

1 
None 

1 

None 
None 
None 
None 

18 

None 

1 

1 

3 

None 
1 
2 

1 
None 

1 

None 
2 
1 

None 
1 
1 




12 

57 
32 
42 
42^ 

49 
51 

36 
67H 

72 

40 
38 

72 
27 
33 

15 

39 
48 
36 
30 

76 
41 
48 
39 
51 

30 
30 
76 

72 
15 

48 
13 
66 
66 

30 
33 
45 


12 
48 
32 
42 
42^ 

42 
45 
36 
48 
42 

40 
38 

45 
27 
33 

15 

39 
48 
36 
30 

42 
41 
48 
39 
46 

30 
30 
48 
48 
15 

48 
13 
51 
45 

30 
33 

45 


166 


27,416 


24,664 
3,253 
5,239 
2,137 

5,486 
7,471 
4,756 
21,972 
13,376 

3,024 

1,660 

125,742 

5,811 
4,246 


18,700 
8,087 
6,436 
4,541 

14,624 
7,644 
10,075 
29,373 
20,669 

5,829 

3,345 

205,530 

(Est.) 
7,440 
9,788 




167 


14,902 




168 


14,058 




169 


8,618 




170 


30,617 




171 


20,549 
19,275 
37,793 




172 




173 




174 


36,736 

19,413 

8,125 




175 




176 




177 


(1) 235,406 




178 


14,282 
15,656 




179 




180 




181 


15,735 


13,609 

423 

1,455 

4,229 

158,987 
3,553 


13,345 
2,677 
3,403 
8,033 

106,544 

4,376 

22,782 

7,960 

13,706 




18?! 


(2) 9,600 




183 


6,597 




184 


12,312 

241,240 
8 486 




185 




186 




,187 




Indefinite 


188 


20,992 
27,221 


6,048 
11,169 


189 




190 




191 


(1) 34,603 
37,818 


9,355 
11,406 
8,998 


14,618 

17,949 

16,723 

1,300 

2,884 

6,900 

18,849 

38,496 

2,206 
5,212 
4,093 




192 




193 


27,007 




194 




195 


7,327 
14,071 


4,913 
3,031 
12,304 

17,747 

3,383 
5,407 
2,970 




196 




197 


29,848 
40 902 




198 




199 


5,322 
10 949 




200 




?,01 


9,226 




?m 




203 


7,261 
5,704 


1,644 

1,528 

20,847 

356 

5,925 
1,076 
4,988 


2,070 

1,938 

11,659 

1,663 

1,157 

11,613 

9,344 

1,605 


1 
1 
3 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 




36 
22 
633^ 

36 

33 
42 
313^ 

24 


36 
22 
41 
36 

33 
42 
31H 

24 


204 




205 


36,808 
5,428 




206 




?07 


8,031 
28,940 




208 




209 


16,416 




?,in 




211 











454 



Year Book 



ASSOCIATION 



Libraries in the following towns are not tax supported. In most cases they are conducted under the auspices 

is reauired from townsDeonle 



required from townspeople 



TOWN 


Association 


Librarian 


Population 








1,071 


213 Burnettsville 


D. K. G 




517 






Mrs. Sarah C. Holaday — 


657 


215 Clifty 


Milford M. E. Church 


139 


216 Elizabethtown 


Welfare Club 




313 


217 Farmland 




Mrs. Golva Greene 

Mrs. 0. N. Huff 


878 


218 Fountain City 


W. C. T. U. ...... 


375 


219 Hope 


Z. J. Callahan 


1,183 


220 Idaville 






650 


221 La Crosse 




Mrs. M. C. Bishop 

J. K. McCarter 


400 


222 Lyons..., 




894 


223 Middlebury 




N. W. Pinkerton 


600 






Mrs. Tennis Dearduff 


1,064 






100 


226 Spiceland 




Mrs. Lillian B. Copeland. . 
Mrs. Bert Cites 


632 


227 Wanatah 


Country Home Improvement Club 
Greene Twp. Library Ass'n 


750 


228 Williamsburg 

229 Wingate 


Mrs. Geo. Davis 

J. G. Hirshbrunner 


350 
464 


230 Wolcott 




868 












11,905 



Public Library Commission 



455 



libraries 

of a club or association, but are open to the public. Sometimes loans are free to all and sometimes a small fee 
not belonging to the association. 



Date 
Organized 


Terms of Lending 


Income 


Volumes 


Addad 
in Year 


Circulation 




1906 


School Children free; 


$475 


2,018 


18 


3,558 


212 


1922 




213 


1920 


Free 










?14 


1920 


Free 










215 


1920 






55 

608 

1,326 




600 
2,457 
3,958 


216 


1922 


Free 


32 
176 


105 

197 


?17 


1907 


Free 


318 


1922 




219 


1907 


Free 










2?n 


1920 


Free 


124 


278 
1,000 


63 




W] 


1912 


Free 




?,m, 


1917 


Free 








223 


1913 


Free 




800 
524 
320 
800 
250 
251 






224 


1872 




21 
70 
58 
218 
63 


1 

320 

200 

95 

19 




fWIR 


1921 


Free 


1,200 

1,370 

3,480 

370 


?,?a 


1921 


Free 


227 


1921 


Free 


??R 


1922 




??9 


1922 




230 


















8,894 


21,923 


c 







456 



Year Book 






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